1911 Firearm Addicts banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there really that big a difference in safety between the 1911 safety off and a striker fired pistol no safety? I am not suggesting a 1911 should be carried with the safety off!!!! But with both guns at the ready finger off the trigger, are you at anymore risk with a 1911 trigger at ~4lbs vs a striker fired trigger at ~5lbs from a practical standpoint.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
A common practice in the 1911 world is to toggle the safety off as soon as the gun is clear of your holster and body. The safety goes back on when you reholster.

The manual safety protects you when you're holstering the weapon and/or moving about. I see this as an advantage of the 1911 over the striker.

There is a reason why we now have the phrase "Glock leg" in our lexicon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Not that my opinion matters much but my thinking is how far you must pull the trigger on each. There is a big difference, no option for error on the 1911.

If you touch the trigger on a strike and it moves slightly, no problem. Big risk on holstering without the thumb Safety on the 1911.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

·
Fictional Western Sage
Joined
·
2,066 Posts
Not sure anyone comprehends these words within the OP...

...But with both guns at the ready finger off the trigger...

It's like saying, "will the square rock spontaneously begin to roll on the absolutely flat dry lake bed with no force applied to it?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
O... i mis-read , "at the ready finger off the trigger" I must be moving and or reloading? No one would be at any risk.. Unless it "just went off" . Which I have never witnessed.
That's why we changed the phrase from AD to ND.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Not sure anyone comprehends these words within the OP...




It's like saying, "will the square rock spontaneously begin to roll on the absolutely flat dry lake bed with no force applied to it?"
Oh, I caught it. But if we have to describe the difference of "At the Ready" between the two then I'm on the wrong forum. ;-)

Honestly, most people I know and follow have the Thumb Safety off during the draw. There is no such thing as a "Thumb Safety" when the 1911 is in the hand. The "Safety" is in the Finger of the Holder.

Pardon the Alliteration.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
Not sure anyone comprehends these words within the OP...




It's like saying, "will the square rock spontaneously begin to roll on the absolutely flat dry lake bed with no force applied to it?"
What exactly is ment by at "the ready"? Does the shooter already have the gun drawn and held in a ready position (e.g. a high ready), or is the gun still in the holster (e.g. the start of a shooting match).

If the gun is held in retention, and the shooter is not running or walking, then the safety need not be on. (I thought this was already common practice.)

If the gun is still holstered, then there is a tangible risk of an AD/ND if the thumb safety is off. (I think most competitions require the safety to be on when the gun is holstered. )
 
  • Like
Reactions: ArtsNCrash

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Not that my opinion matters much but my thinking is how far you must pull the trigger on each. There is a big difference, no option for error on the 1911.

If you touch the trigger on a strike and it moves slightly, no problem. Big risk on holstering without the thumb Safety on the 1911.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
That’s the difference isn’t it. Good point.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
At the ready is suggesting in a home defense scenario where you haven’t yet identified something you may want to stop. So maybe low ready is a better description. As In of the holster, gun pointed forward towards floor.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
At the ready is suggesting in a home defense scenario where you haven’t yet identified something you may want to stop. So maybe low ready is a better description. As In of the holster, gun pointed forward towards floor.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
In that case, my understanding (for whatever that's worth) is that you don't need to have the thumb safety engaged. Trigger discipline is what matters most in that scenario.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
In that case, my understanding (for whatever that's worth) is that you don't need to have the thumb safety engaged. Trigger discipline is what matters most in that scenario.
Thanks. That’s where I had come out as well but I did have a “more experienced” 1911 shooter make a big deal about the acceptability of having a striker fired gun at the low ready with no safeties yet to keep the external safety in the safe position on a 1911 and only flick off just prior to shooting. Which is the source of my question.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
...yet to keep the external safety in the safe position on a 1911 and only flick off just prior to shooting. Which is the source of my question
Ok. Now you've stepped in it. 'Cause that topic is rife with opinions on both sides. Truth told there is no "Correct" answer. It's what works for you. Train how you want and stick to it.

Safely On Much safer if moving around and you can't keep your finger off the trigger. Though this sounds easy enough and obvious, I see lots of people get disqualified at IDPA events for this. Without lots of training, it's easy to forget in the heat of the moment.

Safety Off No chance of forgetting the Safety when you need to make a snap shot.

Merits all around. Just train with your method. Don't assume you can do it. Muscle memory is your friend!

I train that the Safety comes off as I draw, Safery on just prior to holstering.

No Safety if gun is in hand but trigger finger on Slide. Trigger finger only moves to the trigger when I have a Sight Picture and a Clean Shot. If my finger is on the Trigger, I'm shooting.

Close Quarters within 6 feet is a different training method and not part of this discussion.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,504 Posts
to keep the external safety in the safe position on a 1911 and only flick off just prior to shooting.
No I won't even consider that. I have taught myself to only engage the trigger when I am going to shoot. You are asking to be killed if you have to do more than just pull the trigger.
In what situation can you consider adding more things to have to remember, when protecting your life?

When I am hunting Grouse, I do not have the safety on when I am expecting to shoot at a moments notice. When you are expecting to shoot in a split second to save your life. Do you really want to add removing the safety or racking the slide, to a very tense situation where you must engage a target that may shoot back?
Think about all the things that will be going on in your mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
EVEN if i hadn't disabled/pinned the grip safety on most every 1911 I own.. I don't think it would be a wise idea to carry any of them around cocked and not locked.
Ohhh... I'm not sure I'd do that but I get it. It's similar to the 1911 Micros that are built without grip safeties though operate, from the user's standpoint, identical to a full size 1911.

I still like my Grip Safety. But I like the ones with the large bump at the bottom for the positive engagement.

Of course I'm currently carrying an HK p2000sk LEM so obviously grip safeties are not paramount to me. (It was necessary due to size and where I was today. I normally carry a Commander 80% of the time and shoot a Government Model IDPA.)

I never said that even I follow my own standards and beliefs. This is why you should NEVER listen to me. ;-)

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top