A few cool aircraft pics.....

Discussion in 'Open Mic' started by Bender, Sep 1, 2020.

  1. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Sep 22, 2017
    Sadly this was lost last year.

    N9MFlying.jpg
    This was the condition that they found her in originally, the restoration took a lot of years.

    N9M.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Sep 22, 2017

  3. River Rat

    River Rat Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    363
    Mar 4, 2017
    Somebody help me with this one, not familiar. Is it a Bearcat?
     
  4. mtodd

    mtodd 1911 lover Supporting Addict

    853
    Oct 8, 2012
    Unless im badly off it's a F7F Tigrcat
    this is a F8 Bearcat
    bearcat.jpg
     
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  5. River Rat

    River Rat Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    363
    Mar 4, 2017

    You are absolutely correct. Here's a cool vid of one.
     
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  6. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Sep 22, 2017
    F7F Tigercat. Bearcat was F8F
     
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  7. Wildcat Creeker

    Wildcat Creeker Well-Known Member

    901
    Jan 26, 2012
    You are correct. My mistake.
     
  8. joepilot

    joepilot So soon old, so late smart... Supporting Addict

    721
    May 17, 2015
    Now yer talkin'!! When it comes to WWII-era fighters, the Bearcat is at the very top of my list! Would love to fly one someday, but that probably ain't gonna happen. But they sure look and sound fantastic!
     
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  9. mtodd

    mtodd 1911 lover Supporting Addict

    853
    Oct 8, 2012
    And fast as all he77 when set up for Reno aka. Rare Bear
    220DB28A-5404-4D9C-8778-52FB5BD3FEE3.jpeg
     
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  10. joepilot

    joepilot So soon old, so late smart... Supporting Addict

    721
    May 17, 2015
    That's the one! I used to hang out with the Rare Bear bunch at Reno back when Lyle was still around. What a cool airplane and a great bunch of folks. Sure would like to see it out polishing the pylons again.
     
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  11. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Sep 22, 2017
    Darrell Greenymeyer (sp?) had one based at Van Nuys in the 70s
     
  12. NPV

    NPV Well-Known Member

    Nov 15, 2017
    I wish I could take pics at work for you guys.....
     
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  13. LongTimeLurker

    LongTimeLurker Member

    15
    Jul 11, 2016
  14. jjfitch

    jjfitch Well-Known Member

    783
    Mar 26, 2012
    B-58 Hustler! When Dad was stationed at KAFB, San Antonio, TX we lived off base but in the flight path. Saw B-47's, B-36's B-58's KC 97's nearly daily. Our neighborhood lit up at times with landing lights!

    My Dad flew P47 and P51 fighters during WWII! After the war B-47's and B-36's!

    Smiles,
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
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  15. jjfitch

    jjfitch Well-Known Member

    783
    Mar 26, 2012
    Did you know Lt. Col. George "GT" Morgan?

    Google: Absolute speed record in level flight! (SR71 of course!)

    Good friend of mine.

    Smiles,
     
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  16. Scaramouche

    Scaramouche Student of the Columbian Exchange Supporting Addict

    Sep 15, 2015
    Tomorrow is the anniversary of this famous Australian midair collision where cool headed aviators did as they were trained to do and they all lived to fly another day.

    Returning from a long practice flight two Arvo Ansons of the No. 2 Service Flying Training School RAAF collided in mid air over the village of Brocklesby, New South Wales in Australia. Each plane had a pilot and an observer on board. While banking on a long bearing change at 3,000 feet the upper plane lost visual with it's companion.

    [​IMG]

    The violent impact crippled the upper plane's (N4876) engines causing an immediate lost of power, yet the pilot, L.A.C. Leonard Graham Fuller retained control of his ailerons and flaps. He ordered his observer. L.A.C. Ian M. Sinclair, to bail out.

    [​IMG]

    The Anson below (L9162) had it's fuselage sliced open right behind the pilot, L.A.C. Jack Hewson, and the cockpit was fairly crushed. The plane was lodged together with N4876 above. The two planes are seemingly fused together and losing attitude rapidly.

    [​IMG]

    Here is where time starts stretching and a number of unfortunate things begin all at once and if you lose the sense of where you are, you are lost and soon dead.

    [​IMG]

    Hewson, with a back injury, battered with wind screaming through his cockpit's shattered perplex finds he had no control of his aircraft, his engines are still operational, he powers up, talking on the radio with Fuller in the plane above, it's decided Fuller will continue flying to see if he can keep this "flying" nightmare somewhere away from being a peril to the village below.

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile the observer in Hewson's plane, L.A.C. Hugh G. Fraser, is trying to thread a parachute through the wreckage of the fuselage to Hewson so he can bail out with him. They keep losing attitude, the earth is moving swiftly towards them, the roar of the straining engines, the incoming wind is deafening. Hewson finally gets the parachute and wrestles with it on the floor of the tiny cockpit.

    [​IMG]

    By the time the chute is on and he climbed through the destroyed cockpit windows Jack Hewson slid off the starboard wing at 900 feet. In the chaos he clipped his chute on wrong. The chute opens and flares, he's upside down, flaming like an arrow into the earth ever accelerating upward. They estimate the chute finally opened at 80 or maybe 100 feet. He slammed into terra firma so hard he lost consciousness, and jarred his spine. He left a nice divot in the ground.

    [​IMG]

    His observer, Hugh Fraser, having jumped seconds earlier, had a much softer landing and was by his side immediately.

    Meanwhile L.A.C. Leonard Fuller stayed at the controls of N4876 for another five miles where he belly lands this heap of metal, wood and highly flammable aviation fuel in the paddock of a sheep ranch. The locked aircraft slid 200 yards across grass before coming to rest. Fuller considers his touchdown better than any he had made in practice the day before.

    [​IMG]

    The RAAF's Inspector of Air Accidents, Group Captain Arthur 'Spud' Murphy, flew straight to the scene from Air Force Headquarters, Melbourne, accompanied by his deputy, Henry Winneke. During his interview with his Group Captain, Fuller said; "Well, sir, I did everything we've been told to do in a forced landing - land as close as possible to habitation or a farmhouse and, if possible, land into the wind. I did all that. There's the farmhouse, and I did a couple of circuits and landed into the wind. She was pretty heavy on the controls though!"

    L.A.C. Jack Hewson, the pilot of L9162, was the only person injured in the accident and wasn't able to resume flying until January 1941. He spent 3 months in a body brace. He continued flying through the war, finishing it as a skipper of a C-47 with nearly 2,500 flying hours.

    His observer, L.A.C. Hugh G. Fraser was killed in a another air accident in February 1942.

    L.A.C. Leonard G. Fuller, the intrepid pilot of N4872, went on to fly in the RAAF in Europe, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal during a combat flight in Italy. He returned to Australia and was killed by a bus while riding a bicycle in 1944 months before the war ended, an accident that destroyed his family after waiting the long war for their son to return safely.

    [​IMG]
    Sgt Fuller with Australian High Commissioner Stanley Bruce in London 1941

    Fuller's observer in N4872, L.A.C. Ian M. Sinclair got through the war and was discharged from his service in March of 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

    After the accident L9162 was scrapped, N4876 was repaired and continued to fly.

    The Avro Anson was a British designed twin engine multi-role aircraft, it was used primarily by the RAF, RAAF and the RCAF, though many other countries had at least one in it's fleet inventories. It was a hearty little plane manufactured from 1936 to 1968, total output was just over 11,000 units.
    It's stats, briefly were:
    crew 3-4
    max speed 188 mph
    range 790 miles
    service ceiling 19,000 feet
    Some were fitted with a single .303 fixed machine gun in front fuselage and/or a single .303 Vickers K machine gun in a dorsal turret. It had capacity to carry 360 lbs in bombs.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. FWoo45

    FWoo45 Well-Known Member

    Jan 13, 2017
    Frickin awesome post Mouche. I've never heard that story before. Giant brass cajones.
     
  18. rockittsled

    rockittsled Well-Known Member

    496
    Apr 8, 2020
    I agree, and I've never heard it either
     
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  19. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Sep 22, 2017
  20. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Sep 22, 2017

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