1911 Firearm Addicts banner
21 - 40 of 74 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
22,138 Posts
I’m trying to get my head around the investment in equipment to reload vs. good quality off the shelf ammo.
Currently I’m using 1000 rounds per month of 9mm Federal 115 / 124 at $325 per case.
Appreciate your input.
How old are you and how many years and calibers do you shoot?

Good and well maintained equipment lasts a lifetime.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Started reloading shortly after retirement sixteen years ago mainly as another shooting related hobby and not having the time when still working. Load more rifle calibers than handgun and enjoy playing with load development.
Normally bought components during good times and/or on sale if I needed them or not.
Now is probably not a good time to start reloading due to price and availability of components especially if you're trying to save money.
For me it is an enjoyable pass time especially in the winter.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
The monetary value of time for me was such that it was not worth it to reload for many, many years. The pandemic put me on a permanent work-from-home track, and that changed the calculus a lot. I doubt I have saved a dime, but I have enjoyed the time spent rolling it myself. And of course the real treasure was the friends I met along the way. Mostly. Some of them are real a-holes.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
22,138 Posts
I'm retired and disabled. So reloading is something I've been doing 46 years. I load 45 and 308. I can load these for half of factory price
Reloading 308 gives you far better accuracy than factory. Also goes for .223.

With pistol it's easier to dial in a load for your pistols, be it accuracy or just pleasant practice ammo.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
22,138 Posts
At today's prices:

9mm <#300/1,000 - not worth it with primers being the primary reason
45 - worth every minute reloading
38 Super - even more worthwhile
38 Special is right at the breaking point now - I simply can't find good enough 389 Special ammo per 1,000 so that's where the bulk of my small primers go.
This is why you stock up when prices are reasonable. I did :)
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
22,138 Posts
If the only caliber to be reloaded is 9mm it's not worth the cost or trouble. I reload 9mm, 223, 308, and 45acp and it is well wprth the time and trouble
9mm
38 super (asap)
38spl (enough loaded to last years)
45acp
44/40 (since 1971)

7.62x39 (the barrel on my SAKO)
7.62x54 (Nagant)
308
30-06 including light loads for position practice.
Have loaded 50 cal, but won't anymore.

Talk to Ed Harris, he loads a LOT of calibers
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
I’m trying to get my head around the investment in equipment to reload vs. good quality off the shelf ammo.
Currently I’m using 1000 rounds per month of 9mm Federal 115 / 124 at $325 per case.
Appreciate your input.
1) Reloading equipment is a capital investment, it’s for the long haul,
2) The ability to put a few hundred rounds together when none is to be had on the shelves?
3) Components are pricey and the break even point now for some calibers is upside down with this reloading does not make sense, but having the option too always throw a few rounds together and Not being reliant on retail supply This is we’re reloading really pays off.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
As I see it, it is worth it to reload. Period. You can load what you want, when you want. I have zero interest in full house loads. I can load up plinkers, that I am sure of, that don’t recoil much. Sure, I can load up the full house loads. But I tend to plink cans in the back yard. Wrong time to accumulate primers etc I suppose, but they are becoming available. Expensive though.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I have plenty of reloading components, and a Dillon RL 550 B, all of which were bought years ago. So, my reloads aren’t costing me much (even 9mm, which I load the most). As far as brass; I have many many thousands of 9mm and .45 acp brass; all cleaned and ready to go.

For the last 35 + years; I’ve been buying components (and loaded ammo) during the “good times,” and buy none during times like now.
This is key. Still shooting primers under 2 cents and most all 9mm bullets where bought at 6-7 cents. Powder is about 1.5 cents a round for non bull military we have. Not sure if we will ever see primers under 3 cents a round. Reloading is a great way for me to take a break and relax from a hectic day.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
201 Posts
I have been reloading for 30 years and it has not saved me any money but has allowed to shoot more with ammo specific to the mission. I started with pistol ammo and have been loading precision rifle ammo, 1000 yd benchrest for the past 10 years. Components, mainly primers make reloading 9mm difficult to cost justify but if rifle ammo and 45 acp or 38 super can justify it quickly.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
I think reloading is one of those things you should know how to do but it is not that much fun. I don’t really love changing my own oil or fixing a broken car, but it can be satisfying in those cases where the cost is ridiculous, or it’s an imperative for some reason.

Just like buying a desirable 1911, you can buy the reloading gear, some supplies, load some rounds up and get most of your money back if you want to sell it. It’s a pretty low stakes decision to give it a try.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
I have been reloading 53 years and reloading has saved me a huge amount of money. On top of that the reloads I work up have always been more accurate than any factory ammo that I have tried regardless of the cost of the factory ammo. Say what you want about the latest and greatest factory ammo but a savvy reloader can tune his ammunition to the gun in such a way to out shoot any ammo coming from a factory. Believe me the quality of the bullets, powders, technology, and reloading equipment/dies available these days available to reloaders has kept up. The trend these days is so spend a fortune on a gun that will shoot factory ammunition accurately. I have spent my money on reloading components to make my rifles as accurate as the high dollar rifles.

Reloading has been and still is one of the wisest decisions that I have ever made. Reloading components are subject to market price due to the political ups and downs but so is ammo. Right now ammo prices are coming down a little quicker than reloading components. But in my 53 years of riding the reloading storm I have never regretted reloading.
 
21 - 40 of 74 Posts
Top