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Cabot Nero
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148 Posts
It results in a flawless gun. It just does. I think the challenge here is to stop listening to everyone who’s never had one or shot one, and listen to the folks who took the plunge. As of right now, I have no qualms whatsoever in saying Cabot makes the absolute best, high-quality-functioning 1911s ever made.

Yes. Just yes. They’re that good.
And I might be selling one soon ;)
 

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I wish ACW made a Quantico Commander. since they don't, a Cabot Nero Commander might be
my best choice (other than the extra $$) I love a Tactical Commander with a Flat Trigger and Rail.
 

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I think Cabot has proven that CNC machining has gotten to a place that the hard fitting of say…a Les or Ed Brown [etc.] is really no longer needed to get a new 1911 that is so tight it is very difficult to rack the slide by out of the box. My Cabot took at least 250 rounds before racking the slide became reasonable. Even though it is much easier now you still can’t get any wiggle between the slide to frame. The other thing; this level of CNC machining seems to produce the most silky sliding action because there doesn’t seem to be any high or low spots. I’ve been shooting 1911’s for over 40 years and I have never felt anything like a Cabot.

Les, Ed Brown and others may not have the equipment or technology Cabot does, but they also may not believe in producing 1911’s that way, I have no idea.
 

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I’m a dedicated Wilson owner, but also love both my Cabot’s. To each their own……
Since Rob came on board, did he fix all the issues/bad reports Cabot had when they first started out? The Nero and Rebellion I’ve been eye balling for awhile. Prime Elite also. I’m wanting Turnbull charcoal blue, so I’ll wait or spec out a Wilson CQB and get it with Turnbull blue. I really wish NHC would offer it on their non VIP guns.
 

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Lol, interesting read. Cabot seems to be a hot topic at times. I’ve held a NH, Wilson, EB, and a LB. Waiting on my first EB so I can get some range time. Fit and finish on all the previously mentioned are leaps and bounds over the Springers I’m used to buying. For me, Cabot is out of my price range. If you can afford a Cabot, go for it! Send us pics so we can view them. I’ve yet to see a Cabot in person. For me, spending as much or more on a pistol that I would spend on a vehicle to make the money for a pistol just isn’t in my budget😅
 

· Crabby Old Gunsmith
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Cabot Guns aren't as expensive as you imagine they are. $4799 isn't out of line with a lot of other stuff in the marketplace. You might think it is, but you also have to know where and how all the components are made for a this brands price vs the other brands price comparison. From working in the industry for 33 years this month, I know where "all the bodies are buried". It's difficult from my perspective to guide a person without spilling beans that others would have a real problem with being them being made public.

Lol, interesting read. Cabot seems to be a hot topic at times. I’ve held a NH, Wilson, EB, and a LB. Waiting on my first EB so I can get some range time. Fit and finish on all the previously mentioned are leaps and bounds over the Springers I’m used to buying. For me, Cabot is out of my price range. If you can afford a Cabot, go for it! Send us pics so we can view them. I’ve yet to see a Cabot in person. For me, spending as much or more on a pistol that I would spend on a vehicle to make the money for a pistol just isn’t in my budget😅
 

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Cabot Guns aren't as expensive as you imagine they are. $4799 isn't out of line with a lot of other stuff in the marketplace. You might think it is, but you also have to know where and how all the components are made for a this brands price vs the other brands price comparison. From working in the industry for 33 years this month, I know where "all the bodies are buried". It's difficult from my perspective to guide a person without spilling beans that others would have a real problem with being them being made public.
I’ve yet to see a Cabot for that price. But I haven’t done much research so that’s on me. I saw one on this site for $69k and of course the meteorite set that I think is $1M🤣
 

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Cabot really misjudged the 1911 market when they came out initially with all that "New CNC tech so no need for gunsmiths" stuff (paraphrasing I know but that was the sales pitch.) Obviously that's changed, and they found at that they DID need some great gunsmiths and hired one of the best.

1911's are objects of nostalgia, many if not most buyers WANT hand fitting and old school methods of building. Saying you have changed that may sound technologically impressive, but it's not a selling point for most. For that reason many semi-custom makers downplay the amount of precise machining and tech that go into their builds.

Even though Cabot's build methods seem to have changed, the initial perception has stayed the same. Between that perception and the aesthetics, I've never had any interest in Cabot. I did just order a Alchemy Prime Elite, which is the side of the company that really appeals to me.
 

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Cabot Nero
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Their initial start was rocky, no one can argue that, it’s just facts. But the mark and the mettle of a company is how well it addresses their shortcomings, and goodness gracious, did they ever. Rob B and Rob S have done incredible things with that company, and I second the other user who said “I’ve never shot anything like a Cabot.” It’s just on another level entirely.

I agree about the break-in time, 250 rounds is about right. Even thought it doesn’t need it, it works fine right out of the box, but when those parts meet each other and get to know each other real well, the silky smooth operation and the beauty of the craftsmanship just punch you in the face.
 

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I second the other user who said “I’ve never shot anything like a Cabot.” It’s just on another level entirely.
How much experience do you have behind different semi-custom and custom 1911s? Once you get to a certain level they are pretty consistently great IMO.

Mostly the difference is builder preferences IMO. Pick the style you like and go with it.
 

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From working in the industry for 33 years this month, I know where "all the bodies are buried". It's difficult from my perspective to guide a person without spilling beans that others would have a real problem with being them being made public.
Don’t get yourself in trouble bro😅 I’m sure most people are aware there’s multiple grades of tool steel. Assembled and fitted in USA doesn’t necessarily mean made from US bar stock. Just because 1 bar in a lot of bars passes all the tests doesn’t mean every bar in that lot is perfect. I could be wrong but I don’t think any maker specifically says that every component is made from US steel, from a steel company that recieved a Grade A status, and test bar stock X times more per lot to ensure quality .
 

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Cabot Nero
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148 Posts
How much experience do you have behind different semi-custom and custom 1911s? Once you get to a certain level they are pretty consistently great IMO.

Mostly the difference is builder preferences IMO. Pick the style you like and go with it.
I think you’re right about that to a certain extent; I agree that most high-end 1911s feel consistent, until you get to Cabot Guns.

Because their machining process is different, they’re able to achieve the tolerances and the smoothness of operation that I have never seen before. I’ve shot a ton of 1911s, most of them incredible. But Cabot makes their guns different from the very start.

Just one example: most high-end 1911 companies, like most other companies, use trigger pull gauges to measure their trigger pull weight. Cabot uses actual weights. On a scale. It takes SO much longer to dial in the trigger pull that way, but what you get is almost zero derivation in your trigger pull. Ounces matter, Cabot knows it, they dealt with it.

Again, it’s just one example, but the whole entire build quality is “that way.” They don’t care about conventional. They care about what method makes the 1911 function best. They’re obsessed with perfection. They won’t let a gun go unless it’s perfect.
 

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I think you’re right about that to a certain extent; I agree that most high-end 1911s feel consistent, until you get to Cabot Guns.

Because their machining process is different, they’re able to achieve the tolerances and the smoothness of operation that I have never seen before. I’ve shot a ton of 1911s, most of them incredible. But Cabot makes their guns different from the very start.

Just one example: most high-end 1911 companies, like most other companies, use trigger pull gauges to measure their trigger pull weight. Cabot uses actual weights. On a scale. It takes SO much longer to dial in the trigger pull that way, but what you get is almost zero derivation in your trigger pull. Ounces matter, Cabot knows it, they dealt with it.

Again, it’s just one example, but the whole entire build quality is “that way.” They don’t care about conventional. They care about what method makes the 1911 function best. They’re obsessed with perfection. They won’t let a gun go unless it’s perfect.
I've owned or put rounds through just about all the semi-custom guns out there and a few of the top tier smiths. Cabots are nice for sure, not my speed, but nice. The two I've shot certainly didn't give me the feeling you are describing.
 

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Cabot Nero
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I've owned or put rounds through just about all the semi-custom guns out there and a few of the top tier smiths. Cabots are nice for sure, not my speed, but nice. The two I've shot certainly didn't give me the feeling you are describing.
That’s fair, the feeling is a subjective one, of course it is. I wouldn’t shoot a Kimber if you purchased it for me and dropped it on on my doorstep.

What isn’t subjective is the methodology, the time spent in attention to the small details, the materials, the process and the mechanics. Those are processes unique to Cabot that put them, in my category, in another bracket.

Another example (again, it’s just an example); their front sight can’t drift at all. They cannot move because they’re held in place differently than any other 1911 maker. Their extractors are made different. Their slide stop is machine around the rest of the slide so that you can’t get the idiot scratch. Example after example.

The shooting experience is, of course, subjective. That’s why we’re addicts with a bunch of good smiths to feed us :)
 

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What isn’t subjective is the methodology, the time spent in attention to the small details, the materials, the process and the mechanics. Those are processes unique to Cabot that put them, in my category, in another bracket.

Another example (again, it’s just an example); their front sight can’t drift at all. They cannot move because they’re held in place differently than any other 1911 maker. Their extractors are made different. Their slide stop is machine around the rest of the slide so that you can’t get the idiot scratch. Example after example.

The shooting experience is, of course, subjective. That’s why we’re addicts with a bunch of good smiths to feed us :)
YMMV but I'm (and it would seem the majority of this site) not at all sold on the "Cabot method." Despite changes, to me they are still a company designed by non-1911 guys to sell to non-1911 guys.

I haven't had an issue with front sights drifting? Is this something you have had problems with? I do like the option to swap sights at a later date, can you do this with Cabot?

I've never idiot scratched any of my 1911s. They are far from the only company with a method for avoiding this.
 

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Cabot Nero
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YMMV but I'm (and it would seem the majority of this site) not at all sold on the "Cabot method." Despite changes, to me they are still a company designed by non-1911 guys to sell to non-1911 guys.

I haven't had an issue with front sights drifting? Is this something you have had problems with? I do like the option to swap sights at a later date, can you do this with Cabot?

I've never idiot scratched any of my 1911s. They are far from the only company with a method for avoiding this.
I hear you, totally. While I haven’t experienced front sight drift, it happens enough that Cabot felt they wanted to address it, apparently.

I guess I’m just trying to show small glimpses as to what Cabot’s philosophy is. If you’re not the type of person that cares about 100% stamped-US-sourced steel; if you don’t care that every single last detailed piece was made from steel billet, not purchased or MIM; if you don’t care about full-cycle commander technology; if innovation doesn’t matter much to you, then don’t even look at Cabot, that’s perfectly fine.

Their company is different. The reasons they do this are different, and the end result is that they’re extremely pleasant to shoot, and in my opinion, the best 1911 maker out there.

Side note: I’m a Wilson fanatic. My purchase of the Cabot was a shot in the dark, a leap. I now have 2, haha.
 
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