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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I have this bobbed Springer Champion that has an incredible trigger. It is really nice, but there is one thing about it that I wish one of the previous owners had taken care of when they were performing other mods to this gun. I wish they had flush cut the slide stop somewhere along the line. I hate feeling that slide stop "wart" when practicing good gun safety . . . .

IMG_20170908_143344.jpg

I am totally envious when I see all y'alls custom guns with the flush cut and beveled slide stops in them. So earlier today, I had a few extra minutes at work, and I thought, "What the heck?"

Well I've got a John Masen extended slide stop I'd picked up years ago and never put into a gun, mainly because it was a tad too big in all the wrong places. I thought this would have been a "drop-in" but it was far from that. When I got it, I had never heard of Forester Pumice, so I put it aside and pretty much forgot about it.

JM-stop.jpg

Well today I got it out. After careful inspection, I saw why I couldn't get it into any of my guns. It was because the part of the stop that slides into the frame was cast a little too long to fit properly in front of the plunger tube. In fact, it was about a full 3/32th of an inch too long.

So . . . . out come the files and I proceeded to rasp and grind away enough material to get it to nicely slide into place. Once I got it into the frame and the link pin ground flush with the side of the frame, I realized that the thumb shelf on this slide stop is REALLY BIG. It is a full eight serrations wide, where the ambi-thumb safety on the gun is only about five serrations wide. The slide stop was MUCH wider than the thumb safety. The thumb safety also has elegantly rounded corners where this beast is all block-cut.

I realized then that I wasn't finished, I just had to take off three or four lines of the serrations, and round off the edges of the slide stop. I headed home, got out the belt sander, and took this baby down.

When I finished grinding down and contouring the thumb shelf of the stop I realized I had another "problem." The slide stop now had a few "bright and shiny" surfaces where material was removed, whereas the untouched areas were all bead blast matte finished.




IMG_20170908_115239.jpg

Well I don't have a bead blast cabinet and I surely didn't want to send this away and pay to have that done. I was so close to being finished and needed immediate satisfaction. I remember hearing of a "technique" for touching up bead blasted surfaces many years ago but never until today did I have the occasion to try it.

The technique involves laying a piece of 120 to 200 grit sand paper over the area you want the bead blast touched up, and tapping the sand paper into the work with a small hammer. As this part is pretty small, that clearly wouldn't be my best option, so I got out an old maple sanding block, put a new strip of 120 grit sandpaper onto it, and proceeded to beat the bright shiny edges of the slide stop with the sanding block.

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After a few minutes of beating the sand paper onto the shiny areas of the slide stop with the block, it looked like this . . . .


IMG_20170908_120216.jpg


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IMG_20170908_175731.jpg



Not quite BEC or Heirloom Precision quality, but hey, the entire project cost me the price of 1/8th sheet of sandpaper . . . .

Here is the finished project. It looks as good as the gun I put this into, and no more slide stop "wart" to contend with when my booger hook is off the trigger . . .

IMG_20170908_175330.jpg



Now all I need to do is bevel the area of the frame around the slide stop link pin . . .


IMG_20170908_175710.jpg


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good job

looks better than what I would have done to it :)
 
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TANSTAAFL
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Well done!

When I got it, I had never heard of Forester Plummer, so I put it aside and pretty much forgot about it.
If that's who I think it is, well played!:roflmaro:
 

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Christ is my front sight.
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Zoid, if you plan to bevel the hole in the frame the best thing to use is a 3/8 ball end mill. Do you have a drill press? If not, DON'T do it! If you do, then use a drill bit the appropriate size that matches the frame hole and center the hole on the table. Then replace the drill bit with the ball end mill and remove material that way. Don't use a drill bit to bevel the hole, it doesn't work out too well. Ask me how I know. Good luck!
 

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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Discussion Starter #11
Zoid, if you plan to bevel the hole in the frame the best thing to use is a 3/8 ball end mill. Do you have a drill press? If not, DON'T do it! If you do, then use a drill bit the appropriate size that matches the frame hole and center the hole on the table. Then replace the drill bit with the ball end mill and remove material that way. Don't use a drill bit to bevel the hole, it doesn't work out too well. Ask me how I know. Good luck!
I have a 30 degree fluted chamfer drill thingy I planned on using. And yes, the drill press would be in order.
 

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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Looks great!
Looks nice plus you had fun and it kept you out of trouble for a time.
Fine job Man.
Good job there 'Bubba'!
I figured I couldn't do too much damage. I need to true up the end of the stop once I get the recess completed.

That old John Masen extended stop has been an irritation since I traded for it. It wouldn't drop into anything. This Champion had a standard slide stop and I like how the modified Masen stop matches the thumb safety now.

I'm waiting on a set of VZ slim grips to come in to complete the transformation.
 
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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Discussion Starter #13
Zoid, if you plan to bevel the hole in the frame the best thing to use is a 3/8 ball end mill. Do you have a drill press? If not, DON'T do it! If you do, then use a drill bit the appropriate size that matches the frame hole and center the hole on the table. Then replace the drill bit with the ball end mill and remove material that way. Don't use a drill bit to bevel the hole, it doesn't work out too well. Ask me how I know. Good luck!
I don't have any cool machine toolage, but I like your idea. I just might have a round carbide dremel bit I got in my Dad's estate that might do the job.

I'll give it a look.
 
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Sir Kip Esquire
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I'm still laughing over NOT using a drill bit!!
Either flew or you got that nice "catch" mark!
"How the hell am I gonna get this out??"
 

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Christ is my front sight.
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It wasn't pretty no doubt! But it wasn't really deep so I was able to go back once I got educated a little and chase it with the ball end mill which fixed it up a good bit. Thank goodness! I'm still learning a lot but those first couple of guns I did my "experimenting" on........... they got worked over quite a bit. If I had a dollar for every time I went back to them to fix something I did after I learned how to do it. Well let's just say I'd have a lot more in the bank!
 

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Sir Kip Esquire
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Wheelieg,that's the best way to learn.Add in having the brains to figure out what was wrong you win!!
Like following your thread, educational and yeah it's turning out good!! :)
 

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Double Secret Banned
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Mosin Virus used acid to surface etch a stainless part in one of his videos and it matched up nicely.
 
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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Discussion Starter #20
Good luck! It's tricky. Just don't want to bevel it off center. Been there done that and it ain't an easy fix! :p:bang:
So these are the two options I have with toolage I have laying around. I was thinking the chamfer cutter was 30 degrees, but it looks more like 45°.

I don't think it would be too difficult to get it centered.

I guess the third option would be to leave it as it . . . .

IMG_20170909_202531.jpg
 
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