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Discussion Starter #1
All other things being equal, does Colt's dual recoil spring setup provide less recoil and less muzzle flip than a standard recoil spring setup like they advertise? Can anyone with experience with both systems shed any light?

Thanks!
 

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My GCT 9mm came with the setup, I changed it out at 250 rounds for a standard rod and 10lb spring. It's shoots flatter with the standard setup.
 
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I've only had the colt dual spring setup in a LW commander, thought it did just what Colt advertised. YMMV
 

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Hmm, my post didn't post so I'll try again

Only used the dual spring setup on colt lw commander, both 45 and 9mm, I thought both benefitted from the dual spring setup. But I'm susceptible to marketing ploys. Good luck with your decision. and, as always, YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm also wondering what the theory is behind the dual spring design. Why would 2 springs of lighter weight be better than one spring of heavier weight?
 

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My pistol is a 5" 9mm, I thought it was over sprung. The single 10lb spring is much lighter and the pistol runs better.
 
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks Whiten. Which brings me to another question. I understand the relationship between the recoil spring, main spring and FPS. If muzzle flip is mostly caused by the slide impacting the frame, and a heavier recoil spring contributes somewhat to slowing the slide down, how is it many folks report that their pistol shoots flatter with a lighter recoil spring (which would make for a faster moving slide and thus heavier slide/frame impact)?
 

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Thanks Whiten. Which brings me to another question. I understand the relationship between the recoil spring, main spring and FPS. If muzzle flip is mostly caused by the slide impacting the frame, and a heavier recoil spring contributes somewhat to slowing the slide down, how is it many folks report that their pistol shoots flatter with a lighter recoil spring (which would make for a faster moving slide and thus heavier slide/frame impact)?
There are many components to felt recoil. There is the weight and velocity of the projectile, which imparts it's own share of recoil, there is the actual expansion of the powder creating thrust(think of it as a very short duration rocket engine), and then there are the various moving parts of the firearm. The fact of the matter is that there is no change to the total. If you add up all the components, it will always be the same. The only thing that truly changes is the vector, and the duration of the impulse, as long as all other things remain the same. As far as shooting flatter, the slide impact should have no discernable effect. By the time the slide travels fully rearward, the projectile is well on it's way downrange. That is simple math. The projectile weighs a small percentage of what the slide weighs, so the bullet will accelerate much more quickly than the slide.
 

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The other small thing to remember is the faster the slide, the more abruptly it stops and points your gun down. It has some effect on recovery or follow up shot.

I changed a colt LW Officers ACP from dual spring to single. Cant tell the difference shooting it, but it does digest lighter loads. No difference with heavy loads.

David
 

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When I said my pistol shoots flatter, I didn't mean the bullet was flying flat. I meant the gun doesn't dip down like it did when over sprung.

 
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