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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

After reading through the manual for my new DW PM-C and watching several YouTube videos it seems cleaning and lubrication before initial use is necessary. Is firing pin and extractor removal and cleaning/lube needed at this point? My understanding is it can be challenging for seasoned users so a little nervous about screwing things up (I've shot before but first purchase, so no cleaning expertise). Thanks!
 

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I was probably on my 5th 1911 before I broke one down completely. It should be fine, neither area needs oil to run and it is still clean since the gun is new.

Excellent choice, congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! It was probably a little much for a beginner but I figured I'd end up upgrading at some point so why not start at the upgrade?
 

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Field stripping it is enough you don’t need to break it down to bare frame. Just make sure you oil it good with the correct oil. Running it wet for the first 100 rounds is advisable on a stainless DW IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. Planning to use FP-10? Do you know if that is that good both for cleaning and lube? How wet is wet? Are we talking like dripping or just a nice thin layer? Sorry for all the questions but just a beginner here.
 

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FP-10 is good. I use a needle tip bottle like this (Hicet 2-1 OZ Bottles with Stainless Needle tip for All Your Gun Oils by Novinex… Amazon.com : Hicet 2-1 OZ Bottles with Stainless Needle tip for All Your Gun Oils by Novinex… : Sports & Outdoors) and put a drop every 1/2” on both the rails on the frame and rail tracks in the slide. Barrel upper and lower lugs get a few drops. Barrel tip where it contacts the slide gets a couple of drops on the top that run around and towards the bottom.

Don’t feel bad if there is some dripping, especially in the first 2-300 rounds.
 

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You've got to jump into the deep end at some point. Might as well do it now. I recommend watching some utube videos on complete disassembly and do it. It's not rocket science and you'll learn a lot about what makes this little machine tick. Plus it'll give you the opportunity to clean out every nook and cranny to be sure there are no stray bits of metal left over from the machining to cause functional problems.

As for lube, don't over think it. This isn't a Glock or other Mattel toy. These pistols were designed as combat weapons. 1911s love oil. Run it wet using any kind of synthetic oil you want. Don't be stingy on the slide rails, frame rails, barrel hood, or the barrel bushing/barrel. The rest of the pistol can get by with just a thin film on every surface.

Like gun_fan alluded to, run it wet for the first few hundred rounds. After that do whatever you think is best. You won't break it by using too much oil and a thin film will suffice. Just don't run it dry unless you're in below zero temperatures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks! I'll post some pics tomorrow. After my initial cleaning and lube (thanks everyone!) Shot about 70 rounds today. No FTFs and super great accuracy (considering I shot it). Awesome pistol! Only bad thing- slight scratch when replacing the slide stop, but my fault on that.
 

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Nice gun! I am partial to the PMC in Superb! I have a pair of VZ type grips I took off my PMC if you want them let me know (free, not trying to sell). They are magwell cut, but never bothered me.
Wood Brown Product Gun Firearm
 

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If you read the manual about break-in and lubes it may sound silly. But believe me, the extra work is well worth it. No need to do a detail strip. Just a field strip, simple cleaning, and the proper lube is it. What you really want to look out for are the harmful chemicals to the finish.
 

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Looks great. Personally, I'm careful about breaking in a new pistol (or engine!), but there's no need to get too crazy. Just do a field strip, clean with your preferred cleaner, and add a couple of drops of your favorite lube to the friction surfaces. Hand cycle a few times to spread the lube around.

BTW, "friction surfaces" basically means the rails and the tip of the barrel (where it contacts the bushing). I'd put about 50 rounds through it before cleaning/lubing again. Maybe repeat that process for 3-4 boxes of ammo and you're good to go.

As for what products to use, for many years I swore by Hoppe's No. 9 for cleaning and BreakFree CLP or Sentry Solutions Tuf-Glide for lubrication. After trying a bunch of different products over the years, I've settled on Tetra Gun for cleaning and Wilson Combat for lube. Try a bunch and see what you like.

One more thing I haven't seen mentioned in this thread: pick up a barrel bushing wrench. They're only a few bucks, but they'll keep you from scuffing up the bushing...which should be pretty tight on a good 1911-pattern pistol.
 

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Awesome pistol! Only bad thing- slight scratch when replacing the slide stop, but my fault on that.
That is an awesome pistol, cograts! Just remember when you reinstall the slide stop you can push it straight in, yours has a relief notch cut into it that allows it to easily overcome the plunger detent.
 

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I have 2 DW stainless steel pistols. I have had really good luck following DW's break-in procedure and using FP-10. I run them wet and if I see a little bit of oil on the frame I just wipe it off.
 

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As for lube, don't over think it. This isn't a Glock or other Mattel toy. These pistols were designed as combat weapons. 1911s love oil. Run it wet using any kind of synthetic oil you want. Don't be stingy on the slide rails, frame rails, barrel hood, or the barrel bushing/barrel. The rest of the pistol can get by with just a thin film on every surface.
I respect Steve, but this is another simple failure to read the manual. DW's Duty finish is wonderful. There is a reason that they include cleaners and lubes they will stand behind to assist break-in and prevent finish clouding due to incompatible chemicals. I'll bet 50% of today's complaints would have been solved by reading then manual first.
 
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