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With the cost of ammo, there is a lot of talk about dry fire, some say it’s ok, some not, which one is it for a 2011 Staccato
 

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Look at the Staccato Videos. Hilton Yam of 10-8 says in one of them it is safe on the Staccato.
 

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On many pistols, you can insert an appropriately sized rubber O ring (as shown below on a CZ-75) so the hammer hits that instead of the firing pin, which makes the firing pin last a lot longer. (Just remember to remove the O ring before using the pistol for real).
View attachment 671711
1911s (at least quality ones) can be dry fired a lot. Mike Harries started me dry firing in the 70s for IPSC, and I still do. Worst case, you peen the area where the hammer hits, it did happen after a lot of dry firing on my series 70s. You can fix that easily or just get a new and better firing pin.

Worst I've seen on a "not so great" 1911 is the FPS cracked.
 

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Firing pin has a spring.
You’re fine dry firing
 

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If you're concerned, you could always use a snap cap. For what it's worth, I have a Colt Gold Cup that I got used in 1993. It's been dry fired at least tens of thousands of times, probably more. It still has the original firing pin and firing pin stop, and it does not show any signs of unusual wear. This gun also has a lot of rounds through it, and the only part that's ever broken was the lobe on the original Colt slide stop. I think the 1911 is one of the most durable semi auto pistol designs ever made, and, in my personal experience, they are not nearly as fragile or finicky as folks in the internet would have you believe.
 
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