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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The majority of modern 1911s come with lowered and flared ejection ports. However, I noticed that at least one reputable pistolsmith lowers the ejection port but does not flare it.

How essential is ejection port flaring? Is it just a design artifact from the days when 1911 reliability was less understood, or is it a must have feature for serious shooting?
 

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I'm not sure it's absolutely "essential", but it's certainly beneficial. The bigger the hole (lowered port), the easier it is to throw things (brass) through it. Same principal applies to flaring the port, just on a smaller scale being a game of angles.
 

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I think on the Ruger forum it mentioned that Ruger stopped flaring the ejection port on their SR1911s a couple years ago.
 

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Some years ago Jim Clark Jr. built a Bullseye gun for me. The port was lowered but no flare. It hasn't jammed yet, no dented brass. I even had to send the mags. to be tuned. If your're not a reloader bent brass doesn't hurt anything unless it causes a jam. No increase of pressure because it's already fired before ejection.
 

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That would be the forward live round cut at the front of the ejection port, which is not 100% needed either but it does 100% ensure live round ejection.
Does that 100% guarantee take into account the ejector length and shape, breach face width, ejector and extractor location in the slide ,extractor tension, deflection and hook profile as well? ;)
 

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1911 Pistol Smith
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This discussion about ejecting lives rounds come up a few years ago. It was determined that a gun cut with a standard GI ejection port was never intended to eject a live round.

I believe this can be found in some documentation through a google search. Lowering and flaring the ejection port become popular because of mounted scopes and larger optics.

Some 45 acp rounds loaded to max oal like Winchester and some others will not eject live from a standard or a lowered port. This is directly related to the length of the port not the flare or the height. So if a round does not fire the only way to effectively remove it is by dropping the magazine and ejecting it through the mag chute.

I had several A2 Dan Wesson's and Colts that will not eject live rounds and you run the risk of a three point jamb. This does not apply to a spent shell casings.

This could prove a little troublesome for a carry pistol one would think. Supposing a round did not fire and the only way to safely and effectively remove it would be through them dropping of the magazine rather than just ejecting and feeding another round.
 

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1911 Pistol Smith
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Does that 100% guarantee take into account the ejector length and shape, breach face width, ejector and extractor location in the slide ,extractor tension, deflection and hook profile as well? ;)
Of course those have to be done properly as well see explanation above this was a rather lengthy discussion a few years back.
 

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The flair comes from the Bullseye guns of the ‘50’s and ‘60’s. It was to lessen the chance of dented brass. Dented brass meant reduced interior volume hence higher pressure. Higher pressure meant a lower bullet strike from regular grouping
WHAT??

This deserves further explanation please!

Type slow I'm a little hard of hearing....from shootin' these things for over 50 years.....:)
 
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WHAT??

This deserves further explanation please!

Type slow I'm a little hard of hearing....from shootin' these things for over 50 years.....:)
Most of the old Bullseye shooters reloaded their ammo. Still do for that matter. Occasionally cases would get dented by the slide returning to battery. The reloading tools do not remove dents, only resize externally. The dent reduces the volume of the case. With a powder like the one most used then (Bullseye) the pressure is higher when the space for the gasses to expand is reduced. Higher velocity causes a lower bullet strike.
That 9 on the edge of the scoring ring at 5 ‘O clock just may have been a 10 if the case had not had that damn dent.
 

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You guys are silly, we all like flared and lowered ejection ports because they look cooler and that's the most important thing on any well built 1911

Look how ugly this is :p

Cooper-Retro IV.jpg
 

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Ejection port flaring/lowering is about the brass not the gun. I have numerous colts that are older than I am with the plain Jane port and never had a jam issue. In fact, only gun I have ever had a jam in had the lowered and flared port and the issue was the cheap mag I was using.
 

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Not needed and it only "ensures" a half assed gun will run better.
A properly tuned ejector and extractor negates the need for the flare and the cut.
Its a visual enhancement that most have gotten used to seeing.

Nope. In early IPSC it was the standard for a reliable pistol. We got into shouting matches with Colt about updating their pistols for competition. Took them decades to catch up with the rest of the market.

Absolutely necessary? No. Want 100% reliability, yes. I have a 1911A1 NM that I tuned to extractor on and the ejector is fine. I still get an occasional stovepipe
 

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More than one way to get to California as a great friend says to me often. While all cuts mentioned are not 100% needed in any case it adds Extra insurance and not a thing wrong with that. I do challenge those with GI ejection ports to see if you can indeed eject a live round from the chamber (Using snap caps) but measure the oal. The problem exists in many of the guns I see at longer oal than 1.25.

The other thing that arises is the use of long nose ejectors you clear rounds a bit quicker. In those instances the round will often veer toward the right a bit sooner than those with standard length ejectors.
 

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I stumbled upon this and figured I would throw my 2 cents in the bucket. Most of my custom guns DO NOT have a flared ejection port. I personally think they are ugly. That is my opinion as a builder. Extensive testing showed no difference in reliability with flare or no flare, also did not show any difference in brass condition either. However, lowering ejection port proved to be both more reliable and easier on the brass. This is really quite simple as to why. The push/pull ejection method of these guns with the extractor and ejector being on the same basic vertical plane with the top of the ejector face being slightly lower (0.050" or more), logically makes more sense to lower the ejection port to accommodate that vertical plane. GI style ejection ports often create a condition where the brass hits the ejection port. The GI ejectors are setup to push the case upwards to facilitate ejection with the traditional ejection port, but still often resulting in contact. Live round ejection port reliefs are kind of silly in my experience. Tune the ejector length to suit your need. You can eject live rounds with shorter ejectors without any problems. With all that being said... ejector/extractor tuning plays the biggest role in this overall equation though, and is a seemingly very misunderstood fundamental of the mechanics in this platform.
 
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