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Grip and hand size also plays a part. My finger doesn't enter the trigger guard straight in from the middle. My finger is diagonal across the trigger, so flat works much better.



If you have a low grip or little girl hands, I can't help you. ;)
 

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Grip and hand size also plays a part. My finger doesn't enter the trigger guard straight in from the middle. My finger is diagonal across the trigger, so flat works much better.



If you have a low grip or little girl hands, I can't help you. ;)
This x100,000,000,000,000,000
 

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FREEDOM IS NOT FREE
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As far as 1911's go I prefer long and flat. Then there are other things that must be curved and never flat. 😉
 

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I've never had the opportunity to shoot a 1911 with a flat trigger. However, I have striker fired pistols and ARs with straight triggers and like them.
 

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I prefer straight over curved but I'll learn to use a curved if it's the only shape available in the trigger assembly that works best for me. To my thinking it has to do with contact area: curved has more 'skin' on the trigger, I get less 'feedback' about pressure owing to the greater amount of trigger finger in contact with a curved shoe.

With a straight one by contrast, there's very little of my finger actually in contact with it. I come away feeling that I have a better idea of the increase in force I'm putting on it as I pull through.
 

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The Tinker
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Grip and hand size also plays a part. My finger doesn't enter the trigger guard straight in from the middle. My finger is diagonal across the trigger, so flat works much better.



If you have a low grip or little girl hands, I can't help you. ;)
Bingo!!! Give that man a C-gar! (y)
 
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MP Custom
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A little info about the flat trigger in the 1911 and why it was/is so popular. In the IPSC world around the early 90’s STI came out with a long blank plastic trigger for the double stack frames. These triggers were designed to be custom fit to the individual shooter so we experimented with shaping them in many different ways but what we found was that upon the draw and first shot which is extremely quick in the IPSC world was if you finger wasn’t centered on the trigger vertically it could slightly affect your shot and feel by the finger being to high or to low on the curved part of the trigger. With the flat trigger face it was not as critical for your finger to be perfectly centered and the whole surface was the same. I have no idea as to how many STI trigger blanks I fit in those IPCS guns for a few years until it got so popular that STI and SV started making straight triggers then the blank was dropped from production. So for first draw speed shooting is where they truly shine.
 

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The Tinker
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A little info about the flat trigger in the 1911 and why it was/is so popular. In the IPSC world around the early 90’s STI came out with a long blank plastic trigger for the double stack frames. These triggers were designed to be custom fit to the individual shooter so we experimented with shaping them in many different ways but what we found was that upon the draw and first shot which is extremely quick in the IPSC world was if you finger wasn’t centered on the trigger vertically it could slightly affect your shot and feel by the finger being to high or to low on the curved part of the trigger. With the flat trigger face it was not as critical for your finger to be perfectly centered and the whole surface was the same. I have no idea as to how many STI trigger blanks I fit in those IPCS guns for a few years until it got so popular that STI and SV started making strait trigger then the blank was dropped from production. So for first draw speed shooting is where they truly shine.
Or that critical draw and first shot when threatened with deadly violence.
 

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What is your preference?

do you find a functionality difference between them or just aesthetics?
Flat since my first one in my first IPSC pistol back in the 70s. It cuts out trigger squeeze problems with curved triggers if your finger is not exactly where it should be on the trigger. My semi new RO 9mm LWC still has a curved trigger and I really have to work to keep it accurate as it can be. Put a flat trigger in my new Ronin and it shoots like a laser.

First thing I did when a friends 1911A1NM got passed onto me was to put in a flat trigger and fix the trigger pull.

20201013_171029.jpg
 

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Good reading. MCP’s post is enlightening. I can update and say I have a second pistol with a flat trigger. While I am not an ‘all my triggers are flat’ guy I can say I definitely don’t discount them as viable. May use a couple more in the future.
 

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The flat gives you more options about where your finger goes on the trigger. The bottom nub lets you feel where the bottom is. I prefer flat to slightly curved. The ones i have tried with a lot of curve got sold.
 

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The flat gives you more options about where your finger goes on the trigger. The bottom nub lets you feel where the bottom is. I prefer flat to slightly curved. The ones i have tried with a lot of curve got sold.
I have one with a curved trigger I haven't changed yet. Takes a lot more work to stay accurate with it.
 

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I don't have an opinion yet on flat vs. curved triggers since I'm so new to all of this but I just want to thank all of you for all of the amazing input each of you add to this site to teach a newbie like myself to become a 1911 Addict! I am learning so much from all of you, so thank you!
If you have a problem with a curved trigger like can't quite get a decent group no matter what, try a flat trigger.
 
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