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I'm looking to get started into reloading, what do I need to get started the right way. I'm looking at the Dillon 550c as it seems to be a press that will do just about everything. The calibers that I will be loading are 45 and 38 superb. I know there is more to it than just press and dies, thats why I'm asking people that has loaded for a while so I know what i'm getting into. Thanks for any and all help in advance!
 

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The most basic advice I can give is a good clean and comfortable environment that will allow you to concentrate on the task without interruption. Mistakes can be costly and unrepairable in this sport. Once you can achieve that it will be a very enjoyable experience.
As far as Dillon equipment goes, you can’t go wrong. Think about the amount of cartridges that you want to produce and gauge that according to the presses that are available.
Good luck with your endeavors.
 

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Best advice I can offer.
Ever since 1972 I have tried to upgrade my loading tools.
The rig I had to begin was light years behind what I have today.
If you do not plan on loading long range precision rifle cartreidges
then work on the right press & Dies.

I do not have one but many friends have & use the Dillion 650 for
rifle & pistol rounds. All you can do now is read & try to get ahead
of the game with tools you will end up with rather than tools
you will out grow.
 

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I am a new loader (loading 38 super and 45 acp, same as you) so take my advice with a grain of salt but I went with the progressive press so i didn't have to manually index. I purchased a strong mount, bullet tray and 2 bins. You will need A primer tray, tubes, gauge checker, caliper, powder scale. I did some testing on brass cleaning and ended up with the Frankford Arsenal wet tumbler that was mentioned already. Also purchased the Lyman cyclone brass dryer ( you can use the oven). I am using Hornady bullets so also purchased their loading book 10th edition. I gauge test everything and re-test the OAL and powder charge every 100 rounds (i.e when i add new primers). That is just me since i am pretty anal and want to make sure I am not making any errors. I agree with Capthobo advice, when i am loading if someone walks into the room or interrupts what I am doing, I stop loading, put everything down so i can stay focused. Good luck! I find it pretty relaxing. Check out the thread I started on this forum, the experts passed on some good advice on loads, powder and where to purchase supplies.

https://www.1911addicts.com/threads/38-super-new-loader.84819/


 

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Womb? Weary? He rests. He has travelled.
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I use an STM Rebel tumbler with their pins.
What you must have:
Calipers
Scale (I use a beam)
Check weights for your scale
Bench
Something to hold finished cartridges
If you wet tumble the brass you need a separator
Some case lube - I like Hornady
Bullet puller
650 spare parts kit if you go that way(if you can find a 650)
In Line handle for a 650
primer “flipper”
etc...
All the powder, primers and bullets you can afford
Loading manuals
I’m sure I’ve forgotten items but I’m in bed and don’t want to go outside to my loading room.
Once you start, you’ll probably find that reloading is a rewarding pursuit.
 

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The Tinker
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I used to reload for my competition shooting years ago on a Dillon 650. I stupidly sold it to a friend after I stopped competing, and he won't sell it back to me. Some friend... :mad: ;)

I recently put a shopping list together to get back into reloading. I listed a new Dillon 550C and the other things I though I needed to load 10mm, 45 ACP, and 308 and ended up right at $2k for the initial outlay.

I'm going to have to save for another year or so before I can do that. :(
 

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The Tinker
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All this is great info, I just don't want to buy a bunch of stuff thats not needed or doesn't really work for me.
I was buying mostly the necessities to actually start reloading, although I did splurge for extra tool heads and powder measures as I consider them necessary to keep from having to recalibrate things between calibers.

I would eventually spend even more for extra shell trays, primer tubes, etc., etc..
 

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The Tinker
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Now another question, where it buy? Should I got to a local dealer, online dealer, ebay, or just order strait from Dillon?
This is just me, but if I'm buying Dillon stuff I just buy from them. If something goes wrong or is damaged (in shipping or by me), they are really great people to deal with.
 

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Now another question, where it buy? Should I got to a local dealer, online dealer, ebay, or just order strait from Dillon?
Titan reloading often has sales on Dillon and they are an authorized dealer. Dillon has been the best company i have ever dealt with as far as customer service. I purchased my 650 direct from them and I dropped in when trying to install it. I called and explained to them that it was my fault and asked to purchase the few small parts I broke. They wouldn’t allow me to pay, and replaced the parts free of charge, even though it was my fault. They are also great on the phone if you have any questions.
 

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I have a Dillon 550c for 45acp and 9mm. Although not a necessity an extra tool head(s) set up for a different caliber(s) is nice. The optional bullet tray and empty case bin option is also nice. And I have the Strongmount, Dillon roller handle, and Inline Fabrication Skylight.

I dry tumble. I think wet tumbling makes for far nicer cleaned brass dry tumbling is a lot less hassle and dry tumbled brass is clean enough for me.

With the exception of the Skylight I bought all my Dillon stuff from Graf and Son's.
 

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This is an oft-asked question that has been answered many times in previous threads.

Get Lyman #50. It has a good, basic guide to reloading. Almost all manuals from other reloading companies also have good basic guides.
 

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All this is great info, I just don't want to buy a bunch of stuff thats not needed or doesn't really work for me.
Listen carefully to older Reloaders who bought & bought again.
Dillion
RCBS
Hornaday
Wilson trimmers
There are good tools.


Below is a waste of your money.
Lee sucks all the time.

Now another question, where it buy? Should I got to a local dealer, online dealer, ebay, or just order strait from Dillon?
I see reloading equipment at Gun shows & swap meets all the time.
An older reloader will most likely have good tools that you can find at
great prices. Tools are taken care of, & other accesories are thrown in.

Very important!
Go back & read the reloading posts on 1911 addicts it's a wealth of information.
 

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I'm new to reloading as well but a few tips. Get the skylight from inline mfg. Great light. Just me experience, my lyman scale was doa. It was nos so they told me to pound sand. My Frankford arsenal dry tumbler broke after a few uses. The guy on the phone was very nice and said he'd ship me a new bowl. That was a month or more ago. I know I should call but instead I ordered a dillon one. This might be a controversial idea but I say skip the books. Use the loads printed on the powder bottle or off the powder mfg's website. Seems like a more reliable source and I was quite surprised at the difference in charges that the manufacturer posted vs the book. Dedicated tool heads are a must for different calibers IMO. I went with a dillon 650 that was NIB but old stock. Called em and they exchanged it for a 750 for the price difference. $49, they covered the shipping, wouldn't let me pay. Their service is top notch and will keep me buying blue. Calander isn't too shabby either. ;)
 
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