Giving the finger

Discussion in 'Open Mic' started by limbkiller, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. limbkiller

    limbkiller Pulling my hair. Supporting Addict

    Aug 18, 2011
    Before the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, the French, anticipating victory
    over the English, proposed to cut off the middle finger of all captured
    English soldiers. Without the middle finger it would be impossible to draw
    the renowned English longbow and therefore be incapable of fighting in the
    future.

    This famous weapon was made of the native English Yew tree, and the act of
    drawing the longbow was known as "plucking the yew" (or "pluck yew").

    Much to the bewilderment of the French, the English won a major upset and
    began mocking the French by waving their middle fingers at the defeated
    French, saying, "See, we can still pluck yew! PLUCK YEW!"

    Over the years some 'folk etymologies' have grown up around this symbolic
    gesture. Since 'pluck yew' is rather difficult to say (like "pleasant
    mother pheasant plucker," which is who you had to go to for the feathers
    used on the arrows for the longbow),
    the difficult consonant cluster at the beginning has gradually changed to a
    labiodental fricative 'F', and thus the words often used in conjunction
    with the one-finger-salute are mistakenly thought to have something to do
    with an intimate encounter.

    It is also because of the pheasant feathers on the arrows that the
    symbolic
    gesture is known as "giving the bird."

    And yew all thought yew knew everything!
     
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  2. Colorado Sonny

    Colorado Sonny Deo Volente Supporting Addict

    Sep 25, 2015

  3. Mike A

    Mike A Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Mar 19, 2017
  4. Kip

    Kip Sir Kip Esquire

    Apr 12, 2016
    Look at you,going all "labiodental fricative" on us ! ;)
    In honor of this new info...yes I'll up the frequency of use :D
     
  5. Mike A

    Mike A Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Mar 19, 2017
    Kip you can't just drop them 25 cent words & not tell us what they mean :confused:. Some of us R Igornant & don't have no Colage edjamacation like you Kipper LOL.
     
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  6. Kip

    Kip Sir Kip Esquire

    Apr 12, 2016
    Ain't got a clue!!!
    I mix words together anyway,then say "pluck yew" when corrected.
    Pluck 'em!! ;)
     
  7. Kip

    Kip Sir Kip Esquire

    Apr 12, 2016
    Truth is,I first read it as "labia" so it got my attention.
    I just googled it,now more clueless than before...
    There's even some stupid song about it by Bing Bong and the Hush Puppies or something.
    I'll stick with my standard answer for when I have no answer...
    "That's plucked up,did you even measure it???"
    Then walk away all disgusted! :cool:
     
  8. Mike A

    Mike A Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Mar 19, 2017
    Yepper Kipper that's what she said LOL.:)
     
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  9. john_anch_ak

    john_anch_ak Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Mar 7, 2017
    Learned another important history here!
     
  10. tac45

    tac45 What me worry ? Supporting Addict

    Mar 4, 2012
    Another great one Ed .
    The only thing I know is:

    D2F1582C-56CD-43BB-9487-1A32317E6B8E.png
     
  11. Colorado Sonny

    Colorado Sonny Deo Volente Supporting Addict

    Sep 25, 2015

    The voiceless labiodental fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in a number of spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨f⟩.


    Kip U is one cunning linguist!
    :roflmaro::roflmaro::roflmaro:
     
  12. Longbow

    Longbow Well-Known Member

    567
    Aug 15, 2018
    Almost, but not quite correct.

    Goose feathers were used on the war arrows of the English longbow.

    The French removed the first two fingers of the hand, on captured archers, which led to the famous English V-salute, which overtime changed to the middle finger, or "Flipping the bird."

    It would be very rare for the captured archer to be left alive, after a battle, due to the little amount in ransom that would be gained upon releasing the captive.
    Most of the archers at Agincourt, Crecy, and Poitiers, were Welsh; a very poor societal class at that time.

    An interesting read...

    Blood Red Roses: The Archaeology of a Mass Grave from the Battle of Towton AD 1461, second edition 2 Revised Edition
    by Veronica Fiorato (Author), Anthea Boylston (Author), Christopher Knusel (Author)

    And, an interesting video...

     
    livinthelife likes this.
  13. Kip

    Kip Sir Kip Esquire

    Apr 12, 2016
    Spoilsport!
    Problem is everyone thinks the victory sign is "peace out,man" instead of "we kicked ass!"
    Ain't no mistaking the middle finger! :D
     
    KS95B40, livinthelife, nmbuzz and 2 others like this.
  14. Longbow

    Longbow Well-Known Member

    567
    Aug 15, 2018
    Modern archeology from the Mary Rose site, also shows that the English War Bow had a draw weight of 160 to 180 pounds....
    Can you imagine drawing a bow of that weight.

    The average compound bow here, used to hunt deer with, is about 60 to 70 pounds :D
     
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  15. Kip

    Kip Sir Kip Esquire

    Apr 12, 2016
    Always wonder how they drew those bows anyway.
    Figure most are fairly malnourished farmers. I'm sure dietary needs were not having an empty stomach.
    Hand one of us a longbow and we'd get about 5 feet of flight....:oops:
     
    Longbow likes this.
  16. Capthobo

    Capthobo NRA Endowment member Supporting Addict

    Nov 9, 2016
    Thank you Edward
    1911 Addicts is the place for the absolute best free education on the planet.
    Test exam on Friday!! Y’all pay attention now. :):confused::usa:
     
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  17. Longbow

    Longbow Well-Known Member

    567
    Aug 15, 2018
    Following the siege of Harfleur, and the attempted escape of the English, which led to the Battle of Agincourt...
    The English archers and knights had to subsist on a diet of unripe apples and rough cider.
    This led to severe dysentery, and diarrhea....

    The archers fought naked from the waist down for the battle, due to the severe, chronic, stomach issues.

    As a side note to this... The Para's and Royal Marines, during the Falklands campaign also suffered a similar issue, after drinking the islands spring water.
    They also cut the ass out of their fatigue trousers, so as not to be burdened during the march across the islands.
     
    AZPhil and Kip like this.
  18. Kip

    Kip Sir Kip Esquire

    Apr 12, 2016
    Clear cut cases of "embrace the Suck"!!
     
    Longbow likes this.

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