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Overusing oil on a really hot day or a really hot gun can result in hot oil spraying your face. Mr. WC NH experienced this when shooting with a friend of his. I watched him pick up his buddy’s gun, fire, and jerk his head back suddenly. He put the gun back down, took off his shooting glasses, and pulled the bottom of his tshirt up to his face. When he put his shirt back down I saw he had spatter burns where the gun oil had sprayed him.
 
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Overusing oil on a really hot day or a really hot gun can result in hot oil spraying your face. Mr. WC NH experienced this when shooting with a friend of his. I watched him pick up his buddy’s gun, fire, and jerk his head back suddenly. He put the gun back down, took off his shooting glasses, and pulled the bottom of his tshirt up to his face. When he put his shirt back down I saw he had spatter burns where the gun oil had sprayed him.
In all my years shooting I've had plenty of hot brass hit me in the face or go down my shirt, but I've never had this happen to me. My first impression is that your buddy put entirely too much oil on their gun.
 
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I recently read a post discussing how often do you clean your weapon. I mentioned Grease and several people advised me not to use grease, but only oil. That contradicts what I was taught with my 1911, so I want to hear why Oil, or if someone agrees with grease. We bought a weapon each 3 years ago, a Ruger 1911 .45 for me and my wife choose a Charter Arms .32 Magnum Undercoverette 5 shot (found out its the lifetime warranty of theirs too). I made sure we both were taught gun safety again and maintenance of our weapons. I was told to put a light coating of grease instead of oil for a 1911 by this person. Later I had to replace my front sight so I asked the gunsmith to tell me if I was using enough or too much grease. He jokingly told me no such thing as too much grease. He has been a machinist and gunsmith (training with his dad) since he was 7. His dad was a navy machinist and a gunsmith, and he is still both in his 60's now. There is more bio on him, and that is why I trusted his advice too.
So when I clean my weapon I put a light coating of the grease you see in the photo, and oil you see in the barrel. I use the brushes you see too.
Don't just tell me to use one or the other please, but why. I am an old Tech myself and details matter. Thank you before hand.
i use synthetic Weapon Shield "oil".

no grease, at any time, on any of my guns, 22 lr, 9MM, 38/357, or .45 ACP.

the only time i WILL use grease, is when i go to sell a gun. i fully clean it, lightly lube with grease on the rails only, lightly oil on the rest.

on my Dan Wessons? in the owners manual, they recommend Weapon Shield.
 

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There’s nothing I hate more than getting a gun in for custom work to find it covered in caked on grease.

Use oil. Just a few drops go a long way. It’s not a Garand action. It doesn’t need grease. Grease gets hard, cakes up and can slow the action down. It can also get harder to clean up. Don’t over complicate the simple process of putting oil on gun. A couple drops on the rails, maybe a drop on the locking lugs of the slide and that’s all it really needs for lubrication. That’s it. And the rest of the gun might only need a little bit to avoid corrosion.
Grease on M1s and M-14s also collects dirt and sand. Found this out shooting High Power up in the high desert. I never use it on M1s, M-14s, M1As or anything else.
 

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Grease and oil have their own purpose. Sure can I use grease instead of oil, or oil instead of grease. Don't expect them to perform compared to what you SHOULD be using.
 

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Grease on M1s and M-14s also collects dirt and sand. Found this out shooting High Power up in the high desert. I never use it on M1s, M-14s, M1As or anything else.
I just lube my Garand the way everyone tells me but I’m not in a sand environment.
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Anyway, I don’t wanna derail the thread and wanna keep it 1911 related. There’s no need to grease a 1911. It just needs a few drops of oil and to be wiped down every once and a while.

I think lube threads happen because people like to take simple things and make them more complicated than they need to be. It’s in our nature I think. 😀
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
You know, You guys are really great. I especially enjoyed the in-depth explanations and reasoning. It really helped me understand my weapon better. Thank you.
Some points made me curious; so I tried to evaluate what was offered, checked some online manuals, and talked to Lucas Oil.
Whether you agree or disagree, I see enough situations that vary what I should use. So, you all have helped me because there are multiple reasons to use one, the other or both:

1. I checked a couple of manuals online and they all say to oil your weapon.
2. I also saw the cleaning instructions say to remove all grease; and it was not just saying the initial cleaning from the factory or storage. So...
3. I actually talked to Lucas Oil about grease, oil and the spray gun cleaner. They are very helpful. The Lucas Grease and WC Grease are not meant to be heavy grease like previously used. One of the reasons it is designed to be used, is to help wear on areas of high wear like a 1911 and lessen the problems with previous/conventional grease. I have not used the WC Grease, but I will trust a WC product. The Lucas Grease has a blueish color and if you spread it thin, it is colorless. It does not change color; it just means it is a light grease. It is light enough to be present, not seen and prevent wear.
4. In normal circumstances a light coating of the WC Grease or Lucas grease is probably best in some areas, combined with oil in most other areas. Not true for all circumstances, or opinions, but a valid generality.
5. I would consider my environment too. Several of you made valid points about what to do, and “not” to do in certain environments. Now I understand I should be aware of what is optimum for my situation.
6. For extended use: Oil
7. Extended times between firing or storage, Grease, Oil, both, based on environment and other variations again.
8. Oil if I am using it more, with longer periods between cleaning or changing environment.

I mainly go to the range (indoor) once a week 50-100 rounds, they have a great deal on membership with unlimited use, and a 25 yard range with trolleys. So, for me it would be a combination of both Oil and grease; I like the idea of less wear on the heavy wear areas. But I would use Oil at an outdoor range. I clean it after each use, but sometimes I wait one week. If I am taking it to the country or other environments, I will use Oil.
Just my .02 after listening to you guys. Feel free to disagree
 

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I will say this--not all oils are created equal, some are better than others. I have 'experimented' with numerous oils that I have been introduced to over the years and through some 'trial and error' I have those that are superior in my opinion. These include Slip 2000, Gibbs, and Breakthrough.
I've never used the others, but I agree about Gibbs; though it seems thin and runny, it does an excellent job not only of cleaning, but also of lubricating.
 

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I've never used the others, but I agree about Gibbs; though it seems thin and runny, it does an excellent job not only of cleaning, but also of lubricating.
Gibbs also creates a layer of protection against moisture and corrosion so I apply a thin coat to the exterior metal components also. Slip 2000 is my primary lubricant. I came across it through GI, who promote it as their lubricant of choice.
 

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I don’t get the argument. You have reputable 1911 builders on this site, specifically on this thread and on various social media platforms directly saying to use oil, not grease. But somehow grease still gets passionate air time. Modern 1911s run well on good oil without all the baggage of grease. Run oil, add more when necessary, clean once in a while.
 

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I have had great results with lucas gun oil. Just need to do the cold weather testing.
This stuff in the needle bottle
 

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ALG Very Thin Grease is what I use on the rails of all my pistols. Very little goes a long way. Even on my ACW Prime. Combined with a little ALG Go-Juice in a few other places for the win.
 

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Dan Wesson recommends Mil-Comm TW25B grease on stainless steel 1911's rails to prevent galling. Oil on the other friction points.

Ernest Langdon uses TW25B grease on his Beretta models internal fire control friction parts.

Read lubrication instructions for Wilson, Nighthawk, Les Baer, and Ed Brown. I did and found some surprises.
 

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If you live in a colder environment I would not use grease. I use oil. If oil is sufficient for a machine that has soft bearing surfaces it is plenty enough for hard bearing surfaces at very low rpm.
 

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I agree with @JLS1911 that in this discussion you will get a lot of differing opinions on oil v. grease, many of them boil down to personal preference. But to provide some rationale, beyond personal opinion, in this debate, I think you should start with each manufacturers owners manuals or suggestions. From my personal experience, many 'older' gunsmiths or military veterans tend to suggest grease, which is what was popular at that time. I also agree with @EvolutionArmory, one of the biggest 'knocks' against grease is the fact that it tends to trap dirt or debris and can harden over time. Firearm specific oils have become more popular due to their extreme heat and cold tolerances, lubricating ability, and they don't trap dirt/debris like grease.

Very well said, would like to add, every grease picks up particulate and eventually turns to more of a lapping compound than a lubricant. Guess if you cleaned the grease off after every range use you could keep the lapping down. Wish the Wilson grease was white, a couple hundred rounds could prove my point.
 

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Very well said, would like to add, every grease picks up particulate and eventually turns to more of a lapping compound than a lubricant. Guess if you cleaned the grease off after every range use you could keep the lapping down. Wish the Wilson grease was white, a couple hundred rounds could prove my point.
Learned this back in the 70s shooting in the high desert. Stopped using Lubraplate immediately. No grease on any of mine rifle or pistol.
 

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Remember the old saying, "Expensive fishing lures catch more hopeful fishermen than fish" ???


That's my plight.


Grins emerge as soon as some new snake oil arrives at my hacienda. USPS, UPS & FeEx prolly wondering what is dis guy doing with all this lube ????????











Different horses for different courses.

I do use some grease during break-ins with 1911's.....especially the stainless Dan Wessons.

Once they have reached the point where I feel good about carrying them the grease is not used. Just some quality gun oil.


I run 'em wet during break in sessions. Seems to prevent the angst depicted in this meme:




























Missing from the pics are the numerous bottles of Gibbs & Gun Butter that I've been adding to the stash since my first 'Hawk arrived from the Mothership. Gonna run my NHC pistolas with that combination for a while and see how it goes.
 

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Remember the old saying, "Expensive fishing lures catch more hopeful fishermen than fish" ???


That's my plight.


Grins emerge as soon as some new snake oil arrives at my hacienda. USPS, UPS & FeEx prolly wondering what is dis guy doing with all this lube ????????











Different horses for different courses.

I do use some grease during break-ins with 1911's.....especially the stainless Dan Wessons.

Once they have reached the point where I feel good about carrying them the grease is not used. Just some quality gun oil.


I run 'em wet during break in sessions. Seems to prevent the angst depicted in this meme:




























Missing from the pics are the numerous bottles of Gibbs & Gun Butter that I've been adding to the stash since my first 'Hawk arrived from the Mothership. Gonna run my NHC pistolas with that combination for a while and see how it goes.
I’m scrolling up and down trying to figure out if the pic of the hot sauces are an advertisement or you’re lubing your guns with the stuff. 😆
 

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This is how Vickers does it. He sells all kinds of grease and oil through Wilson so I’m going to stick with it. It appears to by a lite coating of Castrol GTX
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