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Deo Volente
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Discussion Starter #1
I am getting ready to put on two new pairs of gorgeous checkered ironwood grips from High Figure Grips. These grips are going on a pair of Colt Gold Cup National Match pistols, 9mm and 45 ACP.

I think I have discovered what is meant by "staked" bushings! After getting out my flashlight and loupe, the back of the bushings appear to have "dimples" around the bottom of the bushings. I was hoping to use some blue Lock Tite on some new Challis grip screw bushings with the proper O-rings.

I smurfed up one bushing and then I looked real close. Grrr....

So I just ordered the grip screw bushing removal tool from Challis.

I am going to have to tell my friend that his soldering iron is dead.

ANY OTHER INSIGHT OR PITFALLS I SHOULD WATCH OUT FOR?
 

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I am getting ready to put on two new pairs of gorgeous checkered ironwood grips from High Figure Grips. These grips are going on a pair of Colt Gold Cup National Match pistols, 9mm and 45 ACP.

I think I have discovered what is meant by "staked" bushings! After getting out my flashlight and loupe, the back of the bushings appear to have "dimples" around the bottom of the bushings. I was hoping to use some blue Lock Tite on some new Challis grip screw bushings with the proper O-rings.

I smurfed up one bushing and then I looked real close. Grrr....

So I just ordered the grip screw bushing removal tool from Challis.

I am going to have to tell my friend that his soldering iron is dead.

ANY OTHER INSIGHT OR PITFALLS I SHOULD WATCH OUT FOR?
The Challis tool works great!!! I would have been willing to send it to you for usage but I'm sure you will end up being glad you got one.
Good luck with the project.

FYI.... I don't use Loctite when I install the Challis bushings.... but that's just me.
 

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Ironwood grips are my favorite.
<-----------

You chose the best with your Challis bushings. A hex drive bushing makes much more sense than a small slot that gets buggered up with a screwdriver. I installed mine without loctite and have never had a problem. I figured I could always loctite them later if they loosened.
 

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I'm done buying guns, I'm just a bystander now
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TC is correct, don't use blue loctite, that's over-kill. The Challis tool will get them out although I doubt they are staked.

Grip Change_5.jpg
 

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I'm done buying guns, I'm just a bystander now
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I'm done buying guns, I'm just a bystander now
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Deo Volente
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Discussion Starter #8
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Deo Volente
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Discussion Starter #9
Here is the best picture I could get of one of bushings from the underside...
 
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Deo Volente
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Discussion Starter #11
I’ve used vise grips and squashed the shiite out of them and twisted them out when they are like that.
Someone suggested either using a #2 straight flute extractor or using vise grips and inserting a screw first.
 

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Womb? Weary? He rests. He has travelled.
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I removed some staked bushings with an Easy-Out, very easily. I believe that with staked bushings the tap may work better than Brian’s tool.
 
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Deo Volente
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Discussion Starter #15
Keep up the suggestions as I think I have thoroughly tagged this so others can find it easily!

USPS was supposed to deliver my grips today, but they haven't yet. They arrived at the local PO at 1239 today.
 
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Not having ever seen this before but a lifetime of working with threaded items that needed to be undone. When you get your Challis tool, try puting some thin cutting fluid on the staked bushing. Use the tool to turn the bushing back & forth. if the bushing was staked into those pockets it MIGHT use those pocket sides to move the bushing material back to its original shape enough that it may unscrew.
Suggestion #2 would be to use a drillpress if possible to drill the bushing center a hair smaller than the thread minor diameter. Of course damage to the frame holes will require tapping threads to oversize bushing specs.

Good luck...... patience is your best tool.
 
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Careful with those staked bushings. I've also used the easy out method, pretty certain I've used left hand threaded drill on Colt staked bushings - IMO the toughest of the bunch. I hate staked bushings! Overkill for certain. I do put a dab of blue loktite when installing new bushings, a bit of heat from soldering and they always easily are removed. Go slow and try not to become frustrated, my main enemy. Good luck
 

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Deo Volente
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Discussion Starter #19
Not having ever seen this before but a lifetime of working with threaded items that needed to be undone. When you get your Challis tool, try puting some thin cutting fluid on the staked bushing. Use the tool to turn the bushing back & forth. if the bushing was staked into those pockets it MIGHT use those pocket sides to move the bushing material back to its original shape enough that it may unscrew.
Suggestion #2 would be to use a drillpress if possible to drill the bushing center a hair smaller than the thread minor diameter. Of course damage to the frame holes will require tapping threads to oversize bushing specs.

Good luck...... patience is your best tool.
If I have to drill it, I have had luck with drilling to almost the same size an crushing what's left...

John Harrison in another post recommended a #2 straight flute extractor for use in thin walled stuff. I have seen spiral flute extractors do nothing on pipe except leave what appears to be lands & grooves.

Just to be on the safe side I will heat this up with a soldering iron for about a minute first.
 
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If I have to drill it, I have had luck with drilling to almost the same size an crushing what's left...

John Harrison in another post recommended a #2 straight flute extractor for use in thin walled stuff. I have seen spiral flute extractors do nothing on pipe except leave what appears to be lands & grooves.

Just to be on the safe side I will heat this up with a soldering iron for about a minute first.
I'll go see if I have a straight fluted extractor that size..... will let you know
 
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