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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was crowing a bit about how well everything went with the installation of my new C&S trigger kit, prior to actually test firing it. Or should I say, attempted to test fire it :oops:. Got the dreaded click instead of a bang, and not a mark on the primers. Figured it was the S80 parts, for some reason, I always want to put the lower lever in backwards. Sure enough, did it again, but on reassembly, now I'm getting hammer follow. It cocks fine by hand, but not when I rack the slide, most of the time. And no, I'm not dropping the slide on an empty chamber.

The instructions that came with the kit say I probably need to shorten the sear nose, usually about .005". I'll go there if I have to, but I don't have a jig or appropriate stones on hand, so I'm looking for suggestions for other things to try before dropping the cash on stuff I'll probably only use this once. If it matters, pistol is an ORM 1991A1, it's been "modified" by the PO, which is partly why I needed to install the kit in the first place. There's a little play in the slide to frame fit, but it still locks up solid and shoots well. BTW, just to make sure I hadn't messed something else up, I put it back together with the original parts, no issue. Thanks for your help.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just an update for anyone interested. Tore it back down yesterday, got out the calipers, and started doing some comparison measuring. Turns out the C&S parts are larger in pretty much all dimensions, i.e. heavier built. Not a huge difference, but there's definitely more metal there, so I'm considering that a good thing. Decided to put it back together with the new parts, only this time, I substituted a heavier WC sear spring. Seems to have solved the problem, at the cost of a slightly heavier (5.5 vs. 4+ #) trigger, something I may tweak down the road if I feel the need. Will probably order a sear jig in the meantime, just in cas I decide I HAVE to get it down to 4# :rolleyes:. Later.

Dave
 

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Hey, I've also ran into issues with some of the C&S "kits, and others too, where the hammer hooks being shortenend to .018" are just too darn short. I prefer mine at least .020". But all mine are potential hard use guns, not range guns. Good luck. Seems you're on the right track
 

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What me worry ?
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I have found that in most cases ,useing c&s magic kits as a substitute for proper “ trigger job “ can be futile and a waste of time and money.
Imho, you would do better learning what it takes to set up a 1911
IE: property square hammer hooks , primary and secondary sear angles,the #.020 , stoning and polishing of parts and trigger track,correct relationship of sear spring to hammer and sear , Ect Ect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have found that in most cases ,useing c&s magic kits as a substitute for proper “ trigger job “ can be futile and a waste of time and money.
Imho, you would do better learning what it takes to set up a 1911
IE: property square hammer hooks , primary and secondary sear angles,the #.020 , stoning and polishing of parts and trigger track,correct relationship of sear spring to hammer and sear , Ect Ect.
Yeah, but you think you're a shark, so what the hell do you know :eek:.o:? Love the sig line, BTW. You're probably right, and in that vein, I've got a sear jig on the way. As to the rest of it, I do have a pretty good understanding of what's going on inside a 1911, but I tend to jump into the shallow end of the pool when getting involved with new stuff. If I decide to stay with it, then I go deeper, spending money on tools and time on learning to use them properly. That's the way an air rifle hobby morphed into a machining hobby, so close tolerance work isn't something I'm afraid of. This seemed like a viable short cut, and it almost worked. And if I need to make some minor adjustments, so be it, I'm still starting with much better quality parts than what was in there. Later.

Dave
 

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Holy crap guys . . . I'd definitely leave trigger jobs (or anything gun related) to absolute trusted EXPERTS! Your life, or someone else's, is worth the expense. I will drive, fly, shoot the **** out it - just not smart enough to fix the darn things. Jus sayin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Holy crap guys . . . I'd definitely leave trigger jobs (or anything gun related) to absolute trusted EXPERTS! Your life, or someone else's, is worth the expense. I will drive, fly, shoot the **** out it - just not smart enough to fix the darn things. Jus sayin.
It's not rocket science, Don ;). Truth is, most guns are pretty simple machines, once a genius like John Browning does the heavy lifting of actually designing them. After that, patience, attention to detail, patience, a willingness to learn the system, and patience is all it takes. And did I mention patience :)? It helps being mechanically inclined, rebuilding a carburetor is more complicated. Later.

Dave
 

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What me worry ?
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Yeah, but you think you're a shark, so what the hell do you know :eek:.o:? Love the sig line, BTW. You're probably right, and in that vein, I've got a sear jig on the way. As to the rest of it, I do have a pretty good understanding of what's going on inside a 1911, but I tend to jump into the shallow end of the pool when getting involved with new stuff. If I decide to stay with it, then I go deeper, spending money on tools and time on learning to use them properly. That's the way an air rifle hobby morphed into a machining hobby, so close tolerance work isn't something I'm afraid of. This seemed like a viable short cut, and it almost worked. And if I need to make some minor adjustments, so be it, I'm still starting with much better quality parts than what was in there. Later.

Dave
That’s right. !!!
Always read the fine print . I don’t listen to myself ether,I’m a shark damnit
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interesting (?) follow-up. Got the Harrison True Radius sear jig in and decided to use my original sear for practice. Turns out that even at the shortest possible setting, the old sear is too short! Makes me even happier that I replaced those parts, even if I didn't get exactly what I thought I was getting. Will most likely tear it down again at some point, just because, but for now, I just want to shoot it and see what I think. Unfortunately, that could be awhile, my local range is shut down due to fire danger, and I don't think there's an alternative within 100 miles :(. Oh well, at least I have a "new" toy on the way that I can fondle in the meantime :). Later.

Dave
 

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Holy crap guys . . . I'd definitely leave trigger jobs (or anything gun related) to absolute trusted EXPERTS! Your life, or someone else's, is worth the expense. I will drive, fly, shoot the **** out it - just not smart enough to fix the darn things. Jus sayin.
I'm the same way, I have taken on a few problems but generally I would rather have someone who has done the work before do the serious work. If I had the time and money to go to a good class though, I would expand my horizons.
 

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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Cue @tac45 and @ZoidMeister in 5-4-3-2-1...
I saw this thread earlier, but in a moment of divine intervention / momentary sanity, I declined to comment.

I have a bit of experience with C&S sear springs and like them for their intended purpose. I tend NOT to accumulate guns with Series 80 trigger safeties, so my lordship in that realm is zilch, and my experience with other C&S parts is likewise.

I have been following along the whole while watching and learning.

I pretty much agree with Dave's statement below, except for lawn mower carburetors . . . . Those things are ridiculously simple.

It's not rocket science, Don ;). Truth is, most guns are pretty simple machines, once a genius like John Browning does the heavy lifting of actually designing them. After that, patience, attention to detail, patience, a willingness to learn the system, and patience is all it takes. And did I mention patience :)? It helps being mechanically inclined, rebuilding a carburetor is more complicated. Later.

Dave
 

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Holy crap guys . . . I'd definitely leave trigger jobs (or anything gun related) to absolute trusted EXPERTS! Your life, or someone else's, is worth the expense. I will drive, fly, shoot the **** out it - just not smart enough to fix the darn things. Jus sayin.
You are absolutely right Dom :)
INHO it takes more than the best tools & the best parts to do
the proper job on any machine. If you know any older Mechanics you may have heard then refer to many modern day techs as parts changers. Think about that for a moment.
The title Mechanic has always referred to a person who understands the way a mechanical device works. Understanding
how it was designed & works helps you understand how it can
fail. Once you understand how it fails, makes it much easier too
repair it to run properly.
In all the many years I have worked on & made machines run
better. I believe that you must trust that you can do a great
job. I you have any doubt, then you will be the smart one &
take it & trust it to someone who can do the job right.
Growing up in the trade I was lucky to have been offered
schooling & had the chance to work with some stellar Master
Mechanics. In the later years I decided to work on Firearms I
learned how each platform was designed & how to fix & modify each one.
I know the golden rule ( Never shoot anyone's Hand loads but your own. ) however I have shot friends loads & they have
trusted my work on their guns.
A horse of a different color LOL. However just as important.
There are old Mushroom hunters & there are Bold mushroom
hunters. However there are damn few old bold mushroom
hunters :usa: LOL. I am an old Mushroom hunter.

Be careful in everything you do, you may just save a life, Yours.
 
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