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Discussion Starter #1
I’m considering hot bluing (not cold or rust bluing) the frame, slide, mainspring housing, and magwell on my next build (or maybe Parkerizing). Does someone have suggestions on the process or a solid reference?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
You're not going to try Mark Lee's Express bluing? Lousy pictures, lousy lighting...but it works.
That's a possibility. It's the "Remove from water, dry, card, and repeat process 6-10 times" part that makes me interested in the hot bluing for 20 minutes.

I will be trying for that really deep blue-black color on the classics.
 

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I’ve done quite a few using Ultra-Black 400 from EPI and a deep fryer from Wally World. The whole process is on the EPI website and it works really well. Let me know if you have any other questions and I’ll help if I can.
Have you tried the Brownells bluing salts? Is the EPI better/different?
 

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No it’s the only one I’ve ever used. I saw a guy do a Glock slide on you tube and followed what he did. There is a fair amount of cash up front but after you buy everything you need it’s really easy to do and it produces excellent results. It’s all a version of black oxide. Read as much as you can about working with the salts and make sure you use PPE. The salts are no joke. EPI will only ship to a commercial address.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
EPI will only ship to a commercial address.
I’m familiar with the dangers of caustic solutions and will get the right PPE. But shipping to only a commercial address will be inconvenient.
 

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Hi,
I built a cheap damp box and only slow rust blue.
I actually enjoy it and usually take a couple of days to do it.
With the damp box you can do 3 cycles a day and with 6 you are done.
The rust blue solution is cheap and safe!
Here is my Retro Combat 1911, slow rust blued!
bb5.JPG
 

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How will you dispose of it when you are done with the process? That may be the reason for the commercial address. I highly doubt you can dispose of it by dumping it down the drain...( Not saying you would, but there are those who would).
 

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The link in post 4 is what may be found as "fertilizer blue" for which supplies should be available locally.

Several corrosive solutions have been used for slow rust blue.

The old books like Howe's show a fast rust blue. In those days, that is what was meant by "hot blue", not the present standard caustic nitrate dip.


Brownells sells a "disposal kit" for their hot salts blue. Ought to work on any caustic process. Any acid would neutralize the solution, but could be a touchy exercise v
 

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I j
How will you dispose of it when you are done with the process? That may be the reason for the commercial address. I highly doubt you can dispose of it by dumping it down the drain...( Not saying you would, but there are those who would).
I leave it in a sealed 5 gallon plastic bucket and reuse it. It’s not a whole lot different than a bag of rock salt. You could probably neutralize it with an acid , maybe vinegar, or something like that. Consult your local laws.
 

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I've done hot bluing with homemade formulas and brownells. Nasty is the only word for it. Parkerizing is simple very straight forward and not nearly as caustic. Maganese is the way to go. Mark Lee's is a great product and doesn't need as much equipment. Very nice finishes.

Today I mainly parkerize.. easy to get gray, greenish or black finish..
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I've done hot bluing with homemade formulas and brownells. Nasty is the only word for it. Parkerizing is simple very straight forward and not nearly as caustic. Maganese is the way to go. Mark Lee's is a great product and doesn't need as much equipment. Very nice finishes.

Today I mainly parkerize.. easy to get gray, greenish or black finish..
I am still seriously considering Parkerizing. My hesitation is that I like the deep blue-black of a nicely blued gun.

Hot bluing is nasty and the bath is a dangerous fluid. But the bluing is in one step - immerse the parts, wait, rinse, done.
 

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Hot bluing is nasty and the bath is a dangerous fluid. But the bluing is in one step - immerse the parts, wait, rinse, done.
There is a bit of prep to get to that point.

Bead Blast.
Degrease parts and wire to suspend the parts.
Rinse
In to the salts
Rinse quickly to avoid flash drying.
Water displacing oil.

I've re-done more than one batch because of poor prep or the water burning off and the part not being fully immersed. It's really not that bad if you follow all of the rules. Do it outside if at all possible. Do not use anything aluminum or zinc coated or you'll have a problem. Read as much as you can beforehand.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
There is a bit of prep to get to that point.

Bead Blast.
Degrease parts and wire to suspend the parts.
Rinse
In to the salts
Rinse quickly to avoid flash drying.
Water displacing oil.

I've re-done more than one batch because of poor prep or the water burning off and the part not being fully immersed. It's really not that bad if you follow all of the rules. Do it outside if at all possible. Do not use anything aluminum or zinc coated or you'll have a problem. Read as much as you can beforehand.
Yes, the prep, as in many things, is key. It is similar regardless of the process. Everything points to the critical need to be really and truly degreased, and then avoid any contamination along the way.
 
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