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I'll post this here too for the guys that arent visiting GT anymore!

Discussion in 'Collector's Corner' started by rsxr22, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    Today I was calling around trying to find some Ruger SR1911's for customers when a guy walked in and asked if he could put a gun on layaway. He started to open the box and I immediately saw it was a 1911 and started to grin and become interested.
    He said the gun was given to him by a family member who passed and along with it had a value attached that read $3200. I had no idea what this gun was and thought it was just a random build until I started taking the gun apart. I removed the SS and in caps read "NASTOFF"!!! I had heard the name before and recognized it, but it wasnt until I did some quick google searching did I really learn about this gentlemen. This is a Nastoff Supercomp in .38 super and with it was also a fitted Colt commander size slide. The whole gun is hard chromed except for the SS which makes me think that the original possibly broke and was replaced?? From everything I read, the general consensus is he is about #5 on the most sought after builds (unofficially of course). So my dilemma, do I scoop it up and put it away for $1600? Im more of a shooter than collector and it wouldnt really fill a role in any of the sports i shoot or do i let the deal go by and allow the store to make some change off of it?? Ill get to the pics before people get bored!
    [​IMG]

    This gun is awesome! The trigger breaks at 2 3/4 lbs! And it is really cool to see a gun built so well from the 80's!! I have seen some better production guns then a lot of the older built customs. It has a bar sto comp barrel, the original swenson ambi TS, king GS, S&A magwell... It is a beauty!! What to do???
     
  2. Quack

    Quack it's mmm, mmm good... Staff Member Admin

    Aug 15, 2011
    was that the gun you wanted to talk about?
     

  3. Glock2740

    Glock2740 1911 addict Staff Member Moderator

    Aug 16, 2011
    Don't know much about it, but it looks like a keeper.
     
  4. dnuggett

    dnuggett Active Member

    150
    Aug 17, 2011
    Wish I could see the whole thing.....

    nm, it would appear that every pic is cut short on the right side. Must not be iPad friendly.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  5. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    yup! thanks for the text LOL
     
  6. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    The story of Nastoff is actually pretty neat from what I read. He was an old school smith that started with bullseye guns but quickly transferred into IPSC because of popularity. LAV and a few others attribute Nastoff to be their biggest influence and supposedly a lot of LAV's early guns were very reminscent of his until he found his own niche. Steve took a job outside of the firearms industry in the late 90's i believe and has been there every since. He still does guns but only for friends.
     
  7. deadite

    deadite #15 to Register! Supporting Addict

    426
    Aug 17, 2011
    That looks like a really great 1911, especially with that fitted Commander slide.

    deadite
     
  8. Bender

    Bender Meh..... Supporting Addict

    Aug 15, 2011
    Like I posted on TOS,......it's a desireable pistol for a collector!
    And,.....that's one that Brian & James do not have!
     
  9. Quack

    Quack it's mmm, mmm good... Staff Member Admin

    Aug 15, 2011
    Trade you my Wilson for it :)
     
  10. Trent

    Trent Site Founder Staff Member Admin

    Aug 15, 2011
  11. djackson

    djackson Member

    132
    Aug 18, 2011
    Id be all over that
     
  12. deadite

    deadite #15 to Register! Supporting Addict

    426
    Aug 17, 2011
    I'm wondering if the current owner of this gun is not the original owner, judging from the updated parts and the idiot scratch. Seems weird that a guy will commission a gunsmith to make a beautiful gun like this yet not be careful while reassembling. Not that the scratch matters. I just like not messing up the looks of my investments.

    I hope you are able to buy it!

    deadite
     
  13. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    You are possibly correct, but you would think if it was the original owner he would have known a little bit more to purchase the pistol. In the guys defense, it would be very easy to put a scratch in it, I use 10-8's armorers tool for it so i never have to worry about scratching it.
     
  14. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    How about the TGO and some $?
     
  15. Quack

    Quack it's mmm, mmm good... Staff Member Admin

    Aug 15, 2011
    Some $ from you?
     
  16. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    yup
     
  17. Sir Guy

    Sir Guy Sharpening Ockham's Razor Supporting Addict

    Aug 20, 2011
    I always enjoy seeing vintage custom guns like that. Build technique and philosophy has arguably changed over the years, but one thing shared among the masters has not: the distinct and under-appreciated attention to detail.

    Andy
     
  18. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    Very true Andy! It is definitely nice to see how it was done back in the day opposed to now. While receiving the back story on the gun, a friend who knows all about guns was telling me who he used to have do his checkering. Also i had no idea that at one point in time, Nastoff had a shop inside American Range, which is the only indoor range in my area. I had only heard bits and pieces about him because he pretty much stopped building guns 7-8 years before i was legally allowed to buy them, but i have learned a lot very quick. It is definitely a gem.
     
  19. bac1023

    bac1023 1911 Collector Moderator

    Aug 15, 2011
  20. Metaloy

    Metaloy Active Member

    712
    Sep 8, 2011
    That is very nice but it doesn't look like a complete Nastoff conversion. One tell tale sign of Steve Nastoff is the "swaged" out magwell. He would actually heat up and swag out the complete frame in the magwell area. But that doesn't mean he did not do some work on it.

    I had the pleasure of speaking with Steve back in about 2005. He was currently working for the DHS as I think he still is.
     
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