1911 Firearm Addicts banner
1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I'm just going to try and do a trigger job on my RO on my own

Brownells is having a sale, so I thought I would pick up what I needed

So, I'm looking for suggestions for ignition parts, springs I might replace and a search jig.

It seems like the Harrison and EGW parts are both well thought of. ISMI springs?

I'd also like to replace the ILS, but does that require replacing the MSH completely?

Thanks!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,688 Posts
Harrison ignition parts are tops- as are EGW's.
The Harrison parts come pretty well finished; hesitate saying "drop in", but are as close as any you'll find.
The last few hammers of his I've used had .018" hooks and his TR sears have been pre-radius-ed.
Other than the secondary sear angle needing attention and the hammer hooks needing the lead edge burnished- the parts were spot on.

The TR (True Radius) sear jig is extremely easy to use- and works.

The EGW parts are of equal quality IMO. They will need to be prepped before use.

If you're ditching the ILS you will need to replace the MSH and one of the parts- I think its the cap, the retainer may be reused.
The mainspring will need to be replaced as well.

I have had good luck with ISMI springs.

 

·
I gotta have more cowbell
Joined
·
3,500 Posts
+1 on the Harrison stuff. If you want less than 4 lbs, you might have to tweak the sear spring a bit, or do what I did and get a Cylinder and Slide light trigger sear spring. I've bought 3. All 3 have dropped right in with no adjustment and gotten the trigger pulls to about 3.5#. Sear and hammer hooks must be prepped right to get this light.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,288 Posts
Harrison TR sear , Hammer, Disco and hammer strut. I like to use Wilson bulletproof sear springs personally. Wolff 19# main spring EGW spring cap and retainer. These are the parts I generally use when doing a trigger job that's not on the factory parts and have had very possitive results everytime. You may also have to replace the thumbsafety something to keep on mind. As it has been fitted to the factory sear. If you buy the Harrison TR Sear chances are you won't need a jig from my experience.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,288 Posts
I personally would attempt the trigger job on the factory parts if you haven't done this before to get a feel how to do it. If you ruin the factory parts it's not a real big deal as you were going to replace them anyway.. The jig that I use is the ed brown Jig but I'm going to get the Harrison Jig in the near future as it seems to be the preferred Jig by most.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
I personally would attempt the trigger job on the factory parts if you haven't done this before to get a feel how to do it. If you ruin the factory parts it's not a real big deal as you were going to replace them anyway.. The jig that I use is the ed brown Jig but I'm going to get the Harrison Jig in the near future as it seems to be the prefer Jig by most.
That is real solid advice there!
 

·
In Kentucky
Joined
·
10,356 Posts
I used nighthawk ignition parts on my Springfield. Cylinder and slide offers great ignition kits. I would of bought their marsoc kit if I'd known about it earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,525 Posts
I need to try one of the Harrison kits, as I never have. Always used an old Brown jig and done it the old way with good success. As Jim says ^^^ the C&S kits work as advertised and I ran one of the 24/7 pro kits for years in a heavily modified Springfield "Loaded". Received a EdBrown "perfection" kit for working over a ruger trade-in 1911 with "trigger work" my buddy took in at his store. While I probably won't recommend it here, it took quite lot of work with jig and stones, it did fit and work well when completed. Sear was very tall w/ no secondary angle at all. But, hey, I got it for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I personally would attempt the trigger job on the factory parts if you haven't done this before to get a feel how to do it. If you ruin the factory parts it's not a real big deal as you were going to replace them anyway.. The jig that I use is the ed brown Jig but I'm going to get the Harrison Jig in the near future as it seems to be the prefer Jig by most.
That's awesome advice. I think I'll order the Ed Brown jig and some stones and do just that that.
 

·
LSU Tiger Fanatic
Joined
·
173 Posts
Will, no offense, but you are not ready to do a trigger job. I did my first, on a RO, only after studying and watching videos for hours. Go to youtube and search the Wilson Combat Gunsmithing vids. There is one on trigger jobs. Watch it over and over.
The term trigger job is misunderstood. After many conversations with Logman on 1911Forum, I finally got it. There are two totally different components to a trigger job. First is the smoothness. You must use use fine grit sandpaper and smooth the sides of all of your ignition parts so there are no raised areas. Check for tiny burrs in the trigger channel. They make files just for this. Smooth out the trigger bow. There is just too much to it to describe here. Just remember a smooth pull and light pull are not the same thing. To lighten the pull you must take some bow out of the sear and disconnector legs of the sear spring. Please do not do this without study. Mess it up and somebody could die.
Rule number one is to go slow. When you think you are going slow enough, go slower, especially when filing. Don't even consider a dremmel. When you work on the sear spring, you have to reassemble the gun after each adjustment to test the pull.
After more than 20 hours of study, video watching and conversations with Logman, I did the work on the RO. It took me more than four hours. I had to disassemble and reassemble the gun ten times to get the right sear spring tension. I got it down to 2.5 pounds. After two more cycles I got to a consistent 4 pounds. And, the pull is slicker that a cat's ass. My good friend bought the gun, and will attest to the final product.
My next job was on a Kimber 10 mm. It took forever to smooth and polish the ignition parts.
One must also understand the sear and thumb safety must work in harmony. If you do a trigger job you have to test the safety. That is covered in another Wilson Combat video, and is crucial.
Whatever you do, DO NOT mess with the sear and hammer hook angles. You can very carefully smooth these parts, but don't mess with the angles. If I do another job I will go with the Harrison pre-tuned sear/hammer. If you study enough you will come across Harrison's true radius sear. I would spend money on these parts rather than a sear jig.
I cannot over-emphasize the necessity of study. Don't take this lightly. Feel free to PM me to discuss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
That's awesome advice. I think I'll order the Ed Brown jig and some stones and do just that that.
Rather than the Brown jig, you might consider the True Radius jig marketed by John Harrison. From comments I see it seems that many, if not most, of the full time smiths here use the True Radius. I have Harrison Ignition sets, with TR sears, in most of my 1911s and the triggers are incredibly smooth.

Before you you jump into doing a trigger job on your RO, take the advice offered to fully understand the 1911 trigger mechanism before changing anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Some of this advice is a little late. lol

I've already ordered the Brown sear jig and stones (ceramic medium and fine and a fine India) along with a Lyman trigger pull gauge.

Worst case scenario, I mess up the factory parts, which I was going to toss anyway.

But, I'll go slow and watch the videos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Some of this advice is a little late. lol

I've already ordered the Brown sear jig and stones (ceramic medium and fine and a fine India) along with a Lyman trigger pull gauge.

But, I'll go slow and watch the videos.

You could always return the Brown jig and get the True Radius......you will need everything else you have coming.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top