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I’ll admit, when I first started reading that thread and learned of the dreaded barrel bump, I went and cried in a corner for a few hours feeling that my Wilson’s were no longer adequate. :LOL:

And then I started doing research. Lots of research. I found threads about ransom testing of various builders to confirm accuracy that was “guaranteed”.

I came away from that with several conclusions. First of all, while there was validity to the importance of 100% contact, it wasn’t an absolute necessity to achieve excellent accuracy. Second, there isn’t one and only one way to fit a barrel so that a high level of accuracy is obtained. And lastly, the ammunition selected is equally important as the barrel fit in order to get good results.

All in all, I respect the philosophy, but it shouldn’t be taken as the one definitive approach.
It seems if all the barrel is fitting is done in a homogeneous approach, things turn out well. I think its important not to do xxxx to xpart of the barrel and yyyy to the y part of
the barrel if the approaches are not compatible. Smiths have acknowledged that. It still is basically will the barrel go into lockup the same way repeatedly, will it be in lockup repeatedly, will it stay locked up during slide/barrel recoil the same repeatedly before the link pulls the barrel down.

Point in hand something I am not fond of…and also my first barrel accurizing deed beyond a fitted bushing. Long linking….yeah, I know but it has its inexpensive merits. Most GI type barrels are slightly long linked. Many production guns are slightly long linked. So calculating the space left above the barrel groove when the barrel is locked up can be taken up with that measurement long link. The barrel is still standing on the link either way. Timing tests and function tests must be checked and corrected. Would I spec a pistol like this..,heck no. But for a beater or similar application…it works.
 

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What me worry ?
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Yes,He is doing great!
You know , I just got off the phone with him and learned everything is ok , and learned why he made the choices he did ,
Joe remains a fine gentleman and I will miss him here , but one must do what one feels best for themselves.
However I did take the opportunity to make sure the old ******* was taking good care of the lovely Ms Heidi,
And make sure he understood that she was welcome here at my Ocean abode as long as he stayed home.
🤣🤣😜😜😜
 

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Bringing this thread back.

I did my first barrel fit using the Weigand fixture yesterday and I like it. This fit is right off the mill and linked up with about 20 hand cycles and no additional work. I wish I got this fixture years ago. The barrels don’t come off the fixture perfect but it’s a great starting point for an exceptional fit. My lug flats are .060 long from the center of the link pin hole so they’re plenty long and with just a little more rounding of the transition, it will have zero possibility of barrel bump. I also know exactly what link I need because my DRO tells me. I can also take material off the lower lugs in less than half a thou increments to really tailor the barrel fit to the customer’s expectations.

787977
 

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ISO The Very Best 1911's
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How does this jive with the Ed Brown print that has been accepted for decades as optimum for 1911 barrel fit? Notice that the flat is a max of .030" as dictated by the print and radius of the slide stop pin.



Screen Shot 2021-07-20 at 9.13.29 PM.png
 

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When I was machining this barrel, the cutter wasn’t even touching the back of the barrel feet with only a .030 flat. With only a .030 flat, is your disconnector slot even where it needs to be or is the disconnector sitting on the very front of the scoop?

I cut my barrel feet so I have about .110 barrel feet thickness left. I don’t use things like the thumb safety being able to go up or the slide being lined up with the frame. Barrel feet thickness is my stop point. People throw around .100 as a min, .1075 as being ideal NM spec so I cut mine to .110. Well above min, above NM spec, my thumb safety will go up and the disconnector usually won’t click. If it does, I modify the slot.

Fitting them this way also means I’ll have to modify my link to allow the slide stop to sit with that much engagement.
 

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Nah. You only have to open it enough just so it moves with the slide stop pin pressed as far as it can. Hardly anyone is fitting barrels with only .030 flats anymore. My .200 cutter didn’t even touch the Kart barrel feet with .030 flats so the barrel straight out of the bag had more than that.

Hell, even ordinance specs had .040 on the drawing.
788549





I’ll take Fred Kart’s barrel knowledge over Ed Brown’s any day. Know what I mean?
 

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ISO The Very Best 1911's
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Nah. You only have to open it enough just so it moves with the slide stop pin pressed as far as it can. Hardly anyone is fitting barrels with only .030 flats anymore. My .200 cutter didn’t even touch the Kart barrel feet with .030 flats so the barrel straight out of the bag had more than that.

Hell, even ordinance specs had .040 on the drawing.
View attachment 788549




I’ll take Fred Kart’s barrel knowledge over Ed Brown’s any day. Know what I mean?
I know them both. Fred makes a great barrel but Ed sure knows how to build a gun. I always have had a hard time wrapping my head around the "right" way to fit a barrel.

One person says "never open the link pin hole" and another says "open it up". The Shuemann barrel fitting instructions say to never open up a link hole to allow link down.

I guess there is a philosophical disagreement between barrel makers on long flat vs link pin hole. Anyway, carry on.
 

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I know them both. Fred makes a great barrel but Ed sure knows how to build a gun. I always have had a hard time wrapping my head around the "right" way to fit a barrel.

One person says "never open the link pin hole" and another says "open it up". The Shuemann barrel fitting instructions say to never open up a link hole to allow link down.

I guess there is a philosophical disagreement between barrel makers on long flat vs link pin hole. Anyway, carry on.
I think you would be surprised by the number of top tier smiths that ever size or oblong the link hole now a days.
 

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ISO The Very Best 1911's
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And Jerry Keefer, RIP

"Most of us bullseye "smiffs" strive for as much flat as we can work into the fit. Keeps the barrel up on the pin longer. It takes some jockeying and unorthadox cutting ( as aside from painting by the numbers) to make it work. I do not enlarge or elongate my link pin holes..This practice results in abrupt, jerky motion to the barrel and can provoke feeding problems.. The longer the flat, the longer the link, so some compensation is made to allow the system to work. I change the angle at the front of the lug to allow a quick drop when it reaches the end of the flat. I have also devised a rotary fixture that allows me to grind a shallow radial groove ( approx. .005 +/- ) deep into the top of slide stop pin, to facillatate the longer link. The link does not make much contact to this area while cycling, and operates smoothly. When fit up, the barrel moves into lockup with a slight pressure, and will not drop back down. I lap the slide and determine the exact upper lug radius and then transfer that dimension to the upper lug of the barrel. The depth of the cut is determined by the lug to firng pin bore centerline distance. Matching the two radii equals more complete contact. The after market barrels do not have a true radius, to facillitate hand fitting. This method, with all three lugs in horzontal contact gives very solid lock up.
My intention is to begin making barrels from scratch to fit each individual slide.
I'll be able to control concentricity, and other dimensions far better.."
Coming Soon :)
Take care

Jerry
 

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So many varying ideologies on the proper build philosophy. As with many things, I don’t think there is one definitive way to build an accurate 1911. There is definitely a wrong way. But there are so many variations that prove success.

Even some top smiths have admitted they’ve worked on guns that they just “knew” would not group at all. Put them on a ransom and they turn out to be tack drivers. Sometimes there are exceptions to every rule.
 

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ISO The Very Best 1911's
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So many varying ideologies on the proper build philosophy. As with many things, I don’t think there is one definitive way to build an accurate 1911. There is definitely a wrong way. But there are so many variations that prove success.

Even some top smiths have admitted they’ve worked on guns that they just “knew” would not group at all. Put them on a ransom and they turn out to be tack drivers. Sometimes there are exceptions to every rule.
totally and completely agree
 

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Procedures evolve and methods improve from things that have been established as standard 30 years ago. Ed Brown is VERY respected in the biz and along with Bill Wilson, they pushed this platform to where it is now.

Now ask yourself this, when was the last time you think Ed Brown fit a barrel?

Keep in mind that things that are published might not actually be correct. Smiths like to point out that the Khunhausen books have a few things in that them aren’t exactly right but the works as a whole are an excellent reference source. I’ve seen a few smiths say the Khunhausen books are good but have you ever seen a Khunhausen gun? Nope.
 

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Procedures evolve and methods improve from things that have been established as standard 30 years ago. Ed Brown is VERY respected in the biz and along with Bill Wilson, they pushed this platform to where it is now.

Now ask yourself this, when was the last time you think Ed Brown fit a barrel?

Keep in mind that things that are published might not actually be correct. Smiths like to point out that the Khunhausen books have a few things in that them aren’t exactly right but the works as a whole are an excellent reference source. I’ve seen a few smiths say the Khunhausen books are good but have you ever seen a Khunhausen gun? Nope.
I always thought Khunhausen was a pseudonym and one really knows for who, though many have speculated Ron Power.

What are your observations of the semi-custom companies' barrel fits?
 
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