Knife Sharpeners ?

Discussion in 'The Cutting Edge' started by Wildcat Creeker, Jun 18, 2020.

  1. Babboonbobo

    Babboonbobo Avatar is back to my favorite things!

    Nov 18, 2014
    Ditto, got rid off all my voodoo sharpening kits and only use stones n strops!

    That would be a good names for a knife or sharpening business.

    Stones-N-Strops! Or maybe a bar? I’m calling dibs;)
     
    Greg M., Bugs and rhjeepdriver like this.
  2. Wildcat Creeker

    Wildcat Creeker Well-Known Member

    694
    Jan 26, 2012
    I am a little surprised at the variety of experiences and opinions. One thing I want to say about using a stone: I have had some and used them for many years, but I acknowledge that I am only guessing at the angle and there is no precision in repeating that angle on every stroke. That is why I am looking for something more. Also, my triangle ceramic sticks are very hard and only good for finishing. If a blade is in bad shape, it would take way to long to sharpen it. That is why I think the kit with five different grits sound like a good idea. You can choose the grit depending on how much repair the blade needs. Thanks everyone for the replies, and if there are more, they are welcome.
     
    Babboonbobo and livinthelife like this.

  3. StrawHat

    StrawHat Well-Known Member

    153
    Sep 18, 2015
    I have a couple of very coarse stones I use to re-establish a bevel or to sharpen garden tools. Yes, the same stones for both. For Western knives, I generally use three progressively finer grits ending at about 600. For production Japanese knives I stop at 4000 or 6000 depending on the knife. Hand made Western knives get the same. Hand made Japanese knives, they get whatever the owner wants, often up to 15-30,000 waterstones and stropped with various diamond pastes on individual strops.

    Kevin
     
  4. Capthobo

    Capthobo NRA Endowment member Supporting Addict

    Nov 9, 2016
    I’ve used this on more than one occasion.
    Works surprisingly well in a pinch.
     
    Mike Meints likes this.
  5. azpoolguy

    azpoolguy Well-Known Member

    Jul 4, 2013
    I have the Spyderco system as I have never spent the time to learn a wet stone. The Spyderco Sharpmaker is easy to use if you don’t have experience free handing a blade.

    I’ve always been interested in a wet stone. So lately I’ve been practicing laying the stones from my Spiderco kit on the counter and marking up the edge of the blade with a sharpie to track my work and maintain an angle.
     
    livinthelife likes this.
  6. mtodd

    mtodd 1911 lover Supporting Addict

    773
    Oct 8, 2012
  7. AZ1911

    AZ1911 New Member

    28
    Sep 28, 2019
    Wicked Edge is the best thing out there. But you have to have deep pockets for it. If you can take the time to really learn how to use Arkansas stones you can get a fantastic edge.
     
    Mike Meints likes this.
  8. Juanmeanburrito

    Juanmeanburrito Member

    21
    Jul 6, 2020
    I turn sharp knives into butter knives while trying to learn how to use wet stones. This will be my preferred method when I get the hang of it......In the mean time, I have a KME basic kit to bring my practice knives back from the dead.
     
    AJP likes this.
  9. Wildcat Creeker

    Wildcat Creeker Well-Known Member

    694
    Jan 26, 2012
    Thanks for the additional replies. I have ordered the Lansky 5 stone deluxe kit. Seems no one has it in stock. But, Amazon expects my order to be delivered next week.
     
  10. Ecosystem3

    Ecosystem3 Active Member

    18
    Aug 23, 2019
    I use Japanese wet stones for my shoemaking knives, 600, 1000, 3000. After that, I use a plain leather strop to keep the edge polished. After 10 or so cuts, I strop again. Very rarely do I need to go back to the stones.

    Want to learn how to put a really sharp edge on your knife, search for how to sharpen a straight edge shaving razor.
     
    Speedy396 likes this.
  11. StrawHat

    StrawHat Well-Known Member

    153
    Sep 18, 2015
    While a straight razor is sharp, the edge geometry is not good for a kitchen knife. Nor is the edge on a kitchen knife the same as what I would put on a cleaver or an axe.

    It is important to remember the use of the tool and sharpen accordingly.

    Kevin
     
    livinthelife and Wildcat Creeker like this.
  12. CardiacColt68

    CardiacColt68 Well-Known Member

    653
    Dec 17, 2015
    I’ve tried stones, but am not that great at it. Did ok with some basic knives, but struggled with a machete. I use a Spyderco Sharpmaker now for knives. It is easy and gets them as sharp as I need them for my purposes.
     
  13. Dave Jessee

    Dave Jessee Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    825
    Dec 31, 2014
    It's not all that hard to get a knife razor sharp but getting an edge that holds that razor edge for a lot of cutting requires controlling the blade angle. For those that can do this freehand on a good stone my hat is off to them.

    I can't control the blade angle free hand like others so I have a Wicked Edge that controls the blade angle. I like hard steels (D2, VG10) that hold a razor edge for a very long time. The Wicked Edge has diamond stones for the hard steels.
     
  14. Stentor

    Stentor NRA Life Member Supporting Addict

    574
    Sep 21, 2015
    I have a Wicked Edge Pro system--does a great job.
     
  15. AJP

    AJP Well-Known Member

    628
    Jun 15, 2017
    I too am a big fan of the Wicked Edge. I held off for a long time, being unable to justify the cost, but fact of the matter is I am complete garbage at hand sharpening a blade. I also have a Spyderco Sharp maker a Lansky stone and a set of water stones but I just couldn't get a satisfactory edge with them.

    After having an epiphany one day that I had several thousand dollars worth of dull knives, I bit the bullet and bought the Wicked Edge. The best part of the Wicked Edge is it takes me out of the equation and puts a razor sharp, consistent and repeatable edge on my blades. One of the best investments I have ever made.
     
    Stentor likes this.
  16. nod

    nod Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    169
    Nov 19, 2015
    How does the Wicked Edge do on smaller pocket knife blades? On their web page they just show a big knife?
     

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