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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok, so have any of you switched out the factory main spring for say a lighter one?

like at least a 19 lb.?

been reading about this, for an easier trigger pull?

right now, Wilson is out of stock, but Ed Brown has them. i have bought several Ed Brown all metal MSH's. i like thier products.

thanks in advance to all that read and respond.
 

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been reading about this, for an easier trigger pull?
The effect of putting in a lighter mainspring on trigger pull can be measured in single digit ounces. In other words, not as much as you might think. It will also allow the slide to move faster to the rear which is usually not a good thing. To compensate for this increased rearward slide speed you can fit a flat bottom firing pin stop. Or you can put in a heavier recoil spring which, while it will slow the rearward velocity a bit, will increase the forward velocity of the slide which also is usually not a good thing. Also, a lighter mainspring will reduce the crispness of the trigger pull.

You'd be better off getting a trigger pull gauge, reading up on the correct way to bend the left and center leafs of the sear spring, and performing the necessary tweaks to that spring.

Once you have the trigger pull gauge you can measure what the current trigger pull weight is. If it's between 3 and 4 lbs, you have a trigger pull that many would envy. A well done mating of the contact surfaces between the sear and hammer is more important to creating an excellent trigger pull.
 

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Get some ISMI springs. You will not be dissapointed. Ismi make several mainspring weights. I run the 22# in all my 1911s. I buy a bunch of various Ismi springs at a time and keep them in the parts box. A good quality trigger job will do you much better than just lightening the mainspring weight though.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The effect of putting in a lighter mainspring on trigger pull can be measured in single digit ounces. In other words, not as much as you might think. It will also allow the slide to move faster to the rear which is usually not a good thing. To compensate for this increased rearward slide speed you can fit a flat bottom firing pin stop. Or you can put in a heavier recoil spring which, while it will slow the rearward velocity a bit, will increase the forward velocity of the slide which also is usually not a good thing. Also, a lighter mainspring will reduce the crispness of the trigger pull.

You'd be better off getting a trigger pull gauge, reading up on the correct way to bend the left and center leafs of the sear spring, and performing the necessary tweaks to that spring.

Once you have the trigger pull gauge you can measure what the current trigger pull weight is. If it's between 3 and 4 lbs, you have a trigger pull that many would envy. A well done mating of the contact surfaces between the sear and hammer is more important to creating an excellent trigger pull.
i actually do have the Lyman trigger pull gauge.
 

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The effect of putting in a lighter mainspring on trigger pull can be measured in single digit ounces. In other words, not as much as you might think. It will also allow the slide to move faster to the rear which is usually not a good thing. To compensate for this increased rearward slide speed you can fit a flat bottom firing pin stop. Or you can put in a heavier recoil spring which, while it will slow the rearward velocity a bit, will increase the forward velocity of the slide which also is usually not a good thing. Also, a lighter mainspring will reduce the crispness of the trigger pull.

You'd be better off getting a trigger pull gauge, reading up on the correct way to bend the left and center leafs of the sear spring, and performing the necessary tweaks to that spring.

Once you have the trigger pull gauge you can measure what the current trigger pull weight is. If it's between 3 and 4 lbs, you have a trigger pull that many would envy. A well done mating of the contact surfaces between the sear and hammer is more important to creating an excellent trigger pull.
Listen & learn to what he said ^^^
He knows his stuff
 

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I did some gratis work for a Nam Vet on his old mixmaster 1911 A1 a few weeks ago. Among several other things, I put in a 19 pound mainspring, as he’d talked about his Parkinsons and some hand damage making it hard for him to rack the slide. He said that the lighter MS did make it easier for him to rack the slide, and the pistol passed all the usual function tests.

As with all such vets that I’ve had an opportunity to help; I told him that any $$ he’d ever owe me “was paid in full, long ago and far away.” As an old Army guy myself; they mean much more to me than my time and some parts money!
 

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I did some gratis work for a Nam Vet on his old mixmaster 1911 A1 a few weeks ago. Among several other things, I put in a 19 pound mainspring, as he’d talked about his Parkinsons and some hand damage making it hard for him to rack the slide. He said that the lighter MS did make it easier for him to rack the slide, and the pistol passed all the usual function tests.

As with all such vets that I’ve had an opportunity to help; I told him that any $$ he’d ever owe me “was paid in full, long ago and far away.” As an old Army guy myself; they mean much more to me than my time and some parts money!
I tell Mrs. C. if its hard for her to rack the slides on my .45s to simply pull the hamer back first.
 

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Here is a tutorial that will give an idea of what is involved in reducing trigger pull weight.

It isn't the only way but it's a helpful tutorial.

Google: "Weigand 2.5 # trigger pull."

It sometimes comes up as a Brownell's Video!

Smiles,
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I did some gratis work for a Nam Vet on his old mixmaster 1911 A1 a few weeks ago. Among several other things, I put in a 19 pound mainspring, as he’d talked about his Parkinsons and some hand damage making it hard for him to rack the slide. He said that the lighter MS did make it easier for him to rack the slide, and the pistol passed all the usual function tests.

As with all such vets that I’ve had an opportunity to help; I told him that any $$ he’d ever owe me “was paid in full, long ago and far away.” As an old Army guy myself; they mean much more to me than my time and some parts money!
you see, i did not mention, but i too have troubles racking the slide back, on all my 1911's, but it is due to old(er) age and some perhaps slight arthritis.

i always pull back the hammer before i insert the magazine, and release the slide with the slide lock lever.

a also always pull back the hammer, for disassembly, once i remove the front bushing.

these 2 operations are (at times) difficult for me.

so this was leading me from reading about springs, and the lower weights, to want to switch out the hammer/main spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'd still suggest sending it to a smith if you're not used to tweaking the sear spring and/or polishing parts of the ignition system which also helps
i do have 2 lower priced 1911's, a Tisas and a RIA.

i have been wanting to tear apart the Tisas so that i can "learn" to do that full tear down. this could be an excellent time to learn how to "'tweak" that sear spring as well.
 

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Good posts here. Agreed the C&S sear springs were what I gravitated to as my Colt supply began to dwindle. I've always used the Colt style and they do definitely reduce trigger pull.

As an example I was respringing my old TRS and installed a C&S sear spring in place of a non reduced finger (??) style spring. Hope that last sentence makes sense, pics would be better. That 1 change reduced the trigger pull to a level I am not comfortable with ( sub 2 lb). Popped the old spring back in an pull returned to a light, crisp pull.

I'm no bullseye shooter and as such have no need for sub 2 lb trigger pull. 5 pulls yielded a 1 1/4 lb average. No thanks. I've got it set at a touch over 3lb currently. I may increase it just a bit by massaging the sear fingers.
 
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