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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Of the weapons I have used, the HK USP-T is the finest. The design often has me looking at it and truly admiring the components. As I watch the threads in here I remark at the desire for uniqueness or at times mimicry of other weapons. The browning hp cut or a hammer from one size to another. The list goes on as does our imagination. This brings me to a thought that, in my mind, seems to be of function and ease of use. One of the details I admire of the USP is the use of a linger trigger guard. As I get in an out of my squad on these artic days I remind myself of my gloves and the wonderful room I had in my HK and I have concerns of two things.
1) The single action trigger in a 1911 is less forgiving than that of my USP first trigger pull. With the smaller trigger guard and a thicker leather glove the act of getting a gloved finger into the trigger guard then seems to add much conscious thought. This is a risk too great to ignore and will need lots of practice. I have not seen reports of it being a problem from the old guard, but they were much more tight lipped as well.
2) I am aware that a trigger guard would have to be cut, grinded, added to and welded and reground to make it look like the original but a bit longer inside to accommodate.
Has this been done before? Are there any known smiths out there that have done this? What would the cost factor be? I have thought of this quite a bit. I know it is possible and functional albeit a pain in the tail.
Could I hear some thoughts from our craftsmen? @MDP @EvolutionArmory @TheCollector @Integrity Arms @Karl Beining
Thank you
 

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I’ve seen Smiths threads in here where they do the cut and weld but I think others use another technique involving heating and reshaping the existing metal to square it out. Cutting it off and welding on a new guard would allow you to get the biggest guard though.
 

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About as big as you can make one on a normal 1911 frame is like this, where moving the root of the guard forward isn't really an option. Imagine this with a short as possible trigger, this is a JEM frame with the inside of the guard machined out large as possible. On a railed or heavy dustcover frame, a guy could remove the whole front of the guard and fashion a new one, but it'd probably cost you about what one of those H&K's would to get done haha

Air gun Trigger Wood Grey Gun barrel
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Karl, thank you for your thoughts on this. It is unfortunate that an extended trigger guard would be so costly for a functional advantage for cold weather "operators" (just meaning those in colder weather areas who would be shooting in gloves) and for those that say shooting a Mark 23 is comfortable i.e. big mitted folks. As I looked and thought about this I too figured that of what is available would be a thin squared guard with a short trigger as you mentioned. So doable, but costly. Thank you.
 

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In the FWIW dept.
ears ago when I built my current carry gun I installed a short trigger in it on purpose so I had more room in it with a fitted glove.
It was when I first moved to upstate NY so I could see my grandkids grow up.

This is a simple solution to give more trigger room.
1. yes without gloves it is shorter than I usually use
2. It doesn't seem to pose a problem shooting it without gloves BUT does give a margin of error with gloves on.
3. My errand gun (SIG 365) has even more room than the short trigger gun.

It was 3 degrees when I went to the store this morning. Honestly, I wore gloves out of the house to the car and then pulled them off to go into the convenient store. Wore them in and out of the grocery store (Sunday Sauce supplies!).

Just now checked in dryfire with gloves on and both guns are easily accessible with gloves on. Thinsulate relatively thin and form fitting. They are mechanics gloves with thinsulate from the big box lumber yard.

Everyday carry Air gun Knife Wood Gun accessory
 

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Jack, you came to the right place!

I remember a few years ago (don't want to show my age) Springfield Armory built a long squared trigger guard 1911 for 'The incredible HULK' Lou Ferringo, sounds like this might be what you are looking fur.........I think back then a square trigger guard was $250, and they do a really nice job I have seen a few. Heck go fir it, life is short.....money is cheap..... and you can always make moe!

The trigger guard front radius that extends to the bottom of the dust cover is a pretty large .44 R., you can do what Karl suggested, your going to cut the existing one off, move the new one forward, I'm guessing you can get a solid .100 forward, maybe 1/8".........it don't sound like much but it would be considerably moe room.

Or better yet, Springfield makes square trigger guard frames now, may send your gun and see if they would fit a new frame?

It would look something like this. This gun was used by glove wearers boarding oil rigs in Persian Gulf.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes Karl that would work with a rail gun and use the tact light as the forward part of the trigger guard.🤣🤣🤣🤣
I may have puked a little in my mouth.
 
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