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One suggestion. You might consider saving your brass, even if you don't reload. For years, I swore I'd never reload again, so I didn't bother. Guess what, I'm reloading.
 

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So, you don't use a bore brush?
No.

I think for a new shooter, the idea that the bore needs to be clean as a dinner plate is an idea that messes up guns. I know there are two camps on this controversial topic and I'm in the less-is-more camp. When I was a new shooter my FIL gave me one of those wooden boxes with all the swabs and brushes in them. I once stole the rods out of it to send patches through a troublesome 22 bore. Aside from that, I haven't used the kit.

For rifles, I know an excessively fouled bore/chamber can degrade accuracy, but I'm not often shooting/cleaning rifles. I used to shoot a fair amount of trap, and was of the mindset that the bore gets cleaned every time I fired the gun. But those aren't pistols.

My cast lead and coated lead pistol loads have yet to cause leading. (Most new shooters aren't going to be reloading, so they're probably shooting FMJ anyway.) At the bench, I'll swirl a patch around in the chamber to keep buildup from keeping rounds from fully chambering. On occasion that patch will run down the bore with a dowel behind it. But I'm not scrubbing it and I'm not wasting patches until they come out clean.

There is a short brush in my range bag that came free in the box with a CZ. It's a loose fit in a 45 bore. At matches, if I'm running a gun that has had historical feeding issues I'll gently brush the chamber during a field-strip wipe down and relube mid-match. It clears my paranoia more than I feel it clears the gun.
 

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+1 on walking around with an unloaded gun around the house just getting used to it's functions over an over again, way past familiarization

ALWAYS remember there is a "chamber gremlin" that tries to slip a round into the chamber when you're not looking TRYING to get you to have a negligent discharge because it slipped one into the chamber when you weren't paying attention/looking. ALWAYS check for a round in the chamber, and if you mentally lapse or put it down even for a second, check again.

I do the dual check- looking down the magwell with the slide open and then actually looking INTO the chamber, TWICE.

"nothing in the magwell, nothing in the chamber"
"nothing in the magwell, nothing in the chamber"

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I'd also suggest electronic ear protection. I personally think dead/non-active/non-electronic hearing protection is a safety liability. These aren't bad. Make sure the on/off knob doesn't hit anything or it falls off.

You'll need them for any training course. You'll need them to hear them your mates at the range. You'll need them to hear directions/warnings/surroundings.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NAG4WX2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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Get a month subscription to Panteo Productions and watch every video that interests you. cheap introduction to training. Not the same as real life with an instructor correcting you, but will introduce the CONCEPTS to your brain at least.

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Make sure your holster covers your trigger completely. Make sure your holster in the trigger area isn't soft or can "sag" into the trigger guard (really old worn leather).

NO SERPA holsters. Others can debate this but MY OPINION, avoid them at all cost.

If you want advice on a decent 1911 holster for $40, PM me.

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UNLOADED, dry fire and practicing slowly drawing from a holster are useful skills, practice slow and deliberately to do it right over speed and practicing it wrong

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don't use/shoot cheap crap ammo like Tula/Brown Bear, anything corrosive. stick with quality ammo that is decent. PMC, American Eagle, etc.
 

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I'd say most of the right things have been mentioned. Since you didn't say what your first "pistola" is so, I'll use your avatar as the example. Looks like a high end 1911 in 9mm, probably came with a nice range bag and a couple of tuned magazines.
Buy some more magazines and BEFORE you use them take the slide off and gently seat them to make sure the magazine doesn't hit the ejector, if there is contact then you need to fit them. If not, when the slide is locked to the rear and you seat the magazine you will bend the ejector. I'd recommend asking the builder to fit them likely they will do it without issue. I'd recommend WC magazines, when one of them malfunctions after several hundred rounds just send it back to WC and they will take care of you.
If it has a barrel bushing then I'd say a bushing wrench should be on the list unless it came with one. The 9mm recoil spring is light enough you will end up not using the bushing wrench but, likely this won't be your only 1911 and one day you'd use it on a pistol with a heavier recoil spring. If it has a bull barrel and a full length guide rod then you need to get a paperclip and make yourself a recoil spring retainer tool, (not a technical term, just what I call it). Basically, straighten a paperclip, bend it into an L shape with the short leg being the end you'll put in the hole in the guide rod. This allows you to take the tension off the slide when taking down the pistol by capturing the spring on the guide rod under tension. This is likely addressed in your owners manual and maybe it came with a little tool already but, if not, just get a paperclip and make one.
If you don't reload, I'd recommend starting, with a single stage press and reading a reputable manual on the topic. Learning on straight wall pistol cases is an easy way to get into it and as someone mentioned earlier, save your brass even if you don't intend to reload. With 9mm prices today, getting the practice you need to gain the confidence and proficiency you need with your new pistol is going to be an expensive endeavor even if you do reload.
Congrats on the pistol, best of luck finding ammo. Reloading components are also hard to find right now without spending a ton of money.
To wrap up my rather extensive list:
1) More magazines (fitted) more commonly referred to as "tuned"
2) Bushing wrench (if your pistol has a barrel bushing)
3) Paperclip
4) Ammo
Have fun :)
 

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ALWALS point the gun in a safe direction! ALWAYS!
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79 Posts
Hey Educated Ones ... Just had a quick question.

What are the most important items a new firearm owner should get after buying their Pistola?

I figured this would help some new owners narrow down what items to focus on after thier purchase. (I would say the firearm and ammo are obvious so no need to include in your top 5)

Here's my top (5) list in order of importance.
  1. Safe
  2. Clean Kit
  3. Belt
  4. Holster
  5. Insurance (i.e. USCCA, CCW, US Law Shield)
If you really want to have fun with your list go at it. But, be serious. :) Let's see your list.
It all depends on what kind of gun you bought. I will assume it's a 1911.
My top 5 would be:
1. cleaning kit with extra cleaning supplies. I will use Q-tips, old toothbrush & old t-shirts cut up for patches.
2. A lot of magazines. Enough for 1 box of ammo.
3. A good pistol rug. To protect the finish of your baby.
4. A good belt & holster.
5. Training.
And 5 tips for you.
1. A safe is a good idea especially if your state requires it or if you have kids or if you live a high theft area.
2. Insurance is a good idea especially if your state requires it or if you will carry or just if you are in danger of a home invasion.
3. A lot of range time. At least once a month or more.
4. Dry fire a lot. But read your manual first. Some guns manufactures are picky about dryfire. A good quality gun uses good quality tool steal. Then dryfiring should be no problem.
5. 1911"s should be cleaned a lot. After every range trip. I've heard of a lot of malfunctions from not cleaning your gun after firing it. Plus I love the smell of gun solvent & gun oil.
With all of that said. Enjoy you new purchase. I love to shoot mine.
 

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I'd say most of the right things have been mentioned. Since you didn't say what your first "pistola" is so, I'll use your avatar as the example. Looks like a high end 1911 in 9mm, probably came with a nice range bag and a couple of tuned magazines.
Buy some more magazines and BEFORE you use them take the slide off and gently seat them to make sure the magazine doesn't hit the ejector, if there is contact then you need to fit them. If not, when the slide is locked to the rear and you seat the magazine you will bend the ejector. I'd recommend asking the builder to fit them likely they will do it without issue. I'd recommend WC magazines, when one of them malfunctions after several hundred rounds just send it back to WC and they will take care of you.
If it has a barrel bushing then I'd say a bushing wrench should be on the list unless it came with one. The 9mm recoil spring is light enough you will end up not using the bushing wrench but, likely this won't be your only 1911 and one day you'd use it on a pistol with a heavier recoil spring. If it has a bull barrel and a full length guide rod then you need to get a paperclip and make yourself a recoil spring retainer tool, (not a technical term, just what I call it). Basically, straighten a paperclip, bend it into an L shape with the short leg being the end you'll put in the hole in the guide rod. This allows you to take the tension off the slide when taking down the pistol by capturing the spring on the guide rod under tension. This is likely addressed in your owners manual and maybe it came with a little tool already but, if not, just get a paperclip and make one.
If you don't reload, I'd recommend starting, with a single stage press and reading a reputable manual on the topic. Learning on straight wall pistol cases is an easy way to get into it and as someone mentioned earlier, save your brass even if you don't intend to reload. With 9mm prices today, getting the practice you need to gain the confidence and proficiency you need with your new pistol is going to be an expensive endeavor even if you do reload.
Congrats on the pistol, best of luck finding ammo. Reloading components are also hard to find right now without spending a ton of money.
To wrap up my rather extensive list:
1) More magazines (fitted) more commonly referred to as "tuned"
2) Bushing wrench (if your pistol has a barrel bushing)
3) Paperclip
4) Ammo
Have fun :)
Fitted magazines??
 

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Yes, As I mentioned, and especially with a custom build you need to make sure new magazines don't hit the ejector when they are seated. When conducting a mag change from slide lock a magazine not properly tuned to a custom pistol may extend too far and contact the bottom of the ejector.
 

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Not So-New-Anymore Member
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242 Posts
Discussion Starter #48
I'd say most of the right things have been mentioned. Since you didn't say what your first "pistola" is so, I'll use your avatar as the example. Looks like a high end 1911 in 9mm, probably came with a nice range bag and a couple of tuned magazines.
Buy some more magazines and BEFORE you use them take the slide off and gently seat them to make sure the magazine doesn't hit the ejector, if there is contact then you need to fit them. If not, when the slide is locked to the rear and you seat the magazine you will bend the ejector. I'd recommend asking the builder to fit them likely they will do it without issue. I'd recommend WC magazines, when one of them malfunctions after several hundred rounds just send it back to WC and they will take care of you.
If it has a barrel bushing then I'd say a bushing wrench should be on the list unless it came with one. The 9mm recoil spring is light enough you will end up not using the bushing wrench but, likely this won't be your only 1911 and one day you'd use it on a pistol with a heavier recoil spring. If it has a bull barrel and a full length guide rod then you need to get a paperclip and make yourself a recoil spring retainer tool, (not a technical term, just what I call it). Basically, straighten a paperclip, bend it into an L shape with the short leg being the end you'll put in the hole in the guide rod. This allows you to take the tension off the slide when taking down the pistol by capturing the spring on the guide rod under tension. This is likely addressed in your owners manual and maybe it came with a little tool already but, if not, just get a paperclip and make one.
If you don't reload, I'd recommend starting, with a single stage press and reading a reputable manual on the topic. Learning on straight wall pistol cases is an easy way to get into it and as someone mentioned earlier, save your brass even if you don't intend to reload. With 9mm prices today, getting the practice you need to gain the confidence and proficiency you need with your new pistol is going to be an expensive endeavor even if you do reload.
Congrats on the pistol, best of luck finding ammo. Reloading components are also hard to find right now without spending a ton of money.
To wrap up my rather extensive list:
1) More magazines (fitted) more commonly referred to as "tuned"
2) Bushing wrench (if your pistol has a barrel bushing)
3) Paperclip
4) Ammo
Have fun :)
Wow, I need to re-read your wonderful post. So much great info. I appreciate it really. You are good ... My first firearm purchase was my DW TCP and you guessed it cambered in 9mm. I am still breaking it in and loving every minute. It’s a great first firearm for me.
 

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Registered
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562 Posts
Hey Educated Ones ... Just had a quick question.

What are the most important items a new firearm owner should get after buying their Pistola?

I figured this would help some new owners narrow down what items to focus on after thier purchase. (I would say the firearm and ammo are obvious so no need to include in your top 5)

Here's my top (5) list in order of importance.
  1. Safe
  2. Clean Kit
  3. Belt
  4. Holster
  5. Insurance (i.e. USCCA, CCW, US Law Shield)
If you really want to have fun with your list go at it. But, be serious. :) Let's see your list.
1. Get a membership to a gun club .
2. Invest in a pistol Class and learn everything you can .
3. Buy reloading equipment and learn to reload .
4. Buy proper cleaning equipment and learn how to disassemble your gun and keep it cleaned and maintained
5. Get a 22 pistol for cheap practice to develop trigger control and sight picture acquisition.
 

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21 Posts
Practice all the time and every time internalise the four rules of gun safety.

Read your manual look up instruction videos about your specific gun.

Gun maintenance the correct lube and cleaning products.

Essential gun smith tools. Screw drivers etc.

Secure storage method .

Training.

Range ammo for practice.

These are suggestions for a good start.
 

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FREEDOM IS NOT FREE
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Ammo, lots of ammo.
 
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