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Discussion Starter #1
I broke an extractor. Recommendations for replacement?
I had a spare I carried for 40 years.
Now I need to pick up a couple more to replace that one.

Since I have one Series 80, I’d like to get one that does both flavors.
Looking at Brownells, there are lots to choose from.
Wilson Bullet Proof, Caspian, Brown, ECW…
Gim’me some of your knowledge.

Also thinking about fitting a bushing onto an old series 80 that has the finger pinchie bushing thingie.
The ECW option looks promising.
Your thoughts?
Thanks for the help.
All the Best,
Jeffrey
 

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Hi,
I've used some of the EGW extractors, it's a little different because the spring is round rather than flat.

Used it on my last Commander build and have another for a GM build.

EGW also makes a more conventional extractor called their Heavy Duty.

Good stuff, coming from EGW from my experience!

https://www.egwguns.com/practical-extractor-45-acp-series-80-blue
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EGW or Wilson BP are the only extractors I use.


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I think it's important to pick an extractor with a slot too narrow for the firing pin stop to fit in. That allows a little leeway in where the hook of the extractor is set relative to the breech face by which side of the side you file to best fir the firing pin stop.
 
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My 1911's are series 70 except my Officers. I use Cylinder & Slide extractors.
https://cylinder-slide.com/Item/CS0023B
Are you using their new ultimate extractor? I've been waiting for someone to report on how good they are. I've found wilson to be the best near drop-in, as the hook needs minimal shaping. The egw heavy duty takes more work, but is exceptional.
 

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I broke an extractor. Recommendations for replacement?
I use EGW Heavy duty extractors exclusively these days. I had flings with Wilson, Cylinder & Slide, Ed Brown, and Caspian along the way and finally settled on EGW for a lot of good reasons one of which was not ease of fitting. EGW designs their extractors with extra "meat" in all the right places so it can be fit to any slide.

No matter which extractor you get do yourself a favor and read through this POST before you begin the fitting process. Fit it right the first time so you don't wind up having to buy another one.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I use EGW Heavy duty extractors exclusively these days. I had flings with Wilson, Cylinder & Slide, Ed Brown, and Caspian along the way and finally settled on EGW for a lot of good reasons one of which was not ease of fitting. EGW designs their extractors with extra "meat" in all the right places so it can be fit to any slide.

No matter which extractor you get do yourself a favor and read through this POST before you begin the fitting process. Fit it right the first time so you don't wind up having to buy another one.
Wonderful link.
By far the best example I've seen.
And making the gauge seems like the ideal way to set the deflection.
Thanks to all.
Jeffrey
 

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Wonderful link.
By far the best example I've seen.
And making the gauge seems like the ideal way to set the deflection.
Thanks to all.
Jeffrey
Hi,
I thought I knew 1911 extractors pretty well, but admittedly, it was more, feeling my way along and picking up info where ever I could, not having a Mentor.

When I saw Steve's Info, which he has been gracious enough, to share with all of us, it was a much needed education, that answered a LOT, of my questions.

If you follow Steve's advice, I know you can get your extraction problems fixed!
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Discussion Starter #11
Think I might try one of each of the Wilson and the ECW.
Since it took me 45 years to break the first one. Think I may be good for awhile.
The reason it broke (I think) was because I was trying some very low charges of B.E. to see how soft a shooting gun I could make.
Didn't have the lower power recoil spring installed that I thought I did. Think the recoil short cycled the slide and managed to get the rim to hit the extractor just right to pop the head off.
Hence my building of a spring tester to check the actual weight of the recoil springs.
All the Best,
Jeffrey
 

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Are you using their new ultimate extractor? I've been waiting for someone to report on how good they are. I've found wilson to be the best near drop-in, as the hook needs minimal shaping. The egw heavy duty takes more work, but is exceptional.
Wilson also has a video on youtube about tuning their extractors
 

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The Tinker
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Fitting a extractor is not rocket science (no offense to Steve). Pretty easy actually, and no, I have no idea what the dimensions are supposed to be, nor care. Maybe the hundreds I've fitted are just flukes? ;)
 

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Hi,
Well, having a Marine Engineer background, I've seen a lot of both approaches to a problem...

Being by the numbers and by one's experience.

Nothing wrong with experience but if some type of scale or numbers are not used, hard to teach or convey the correct way of doing something.

On my Commander build I wanted to undercut the trigger guard to get a higher grip on the frame.

I was able to get info on the cut, but no info on the setup or angle.

The problem with undercutting the frame is of course going to deep and having a hole where you don't really need one.

My solution was to use tape and set up the cutter in the apex of the tape at the angle that it gave top to bottom.

This worked out quite well cutting into the frame, .090 of an inch, and although not a real Machinist Technique, gave me a way to get REPEATABLE results!


Repeatable results, is a good thing, as it can be documented, so the next guy, does not have to reinvent the wheel, to get to the level, he can do it by experience?

Just a thought I had, and thinking back from learning about, how an Engine Room, with all the Support Systems, for a Ship, and maintaining an Engine, that would not fit, into your house!:LOL:
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The Tinker
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I have typically shown others how I do things by example. Showing someone how an extractor is supposed to work, and pointing out the areas to visually inspect (and what to look for) helps those I have worked with. I don't try to do cookie cutter, as I have found that there are too many variables that can come into play, regardless of what I'm working on. So when I build/modify something, I work with what I am given and adjust accordingly.

So I can probably say that every extractor I have ever fit is slightly different in one way or another. But they all work. And at the end of the day (my day), that is all that matters to me. I've always believed that there is always more than one way to accomplish a task/goal. I've never been one to listen to those who scream and yell saying that their way is the only way to do something. Maybe it's a personal problem. ;)

And maybe that's why I like apprenticeships and mentoring. Not everything is learnable by just reading a book. Spent years reading books and listening to teachers telling me how engineering works. Then I had to go out and learn how stuff works in the real world and adjust accordingly. It's all good. :)
 

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Are you using their new ultimate extractor? I've been waiting for someone to report on how good they are. I've found wilson to be the best near drop-in, as the hook needs minimal shaping. The egw heavy duty takes more work, but is exceptional.
I have C&S Ultimate Extractors in both of my Springfields and one will go into the 1911 I’m building. I like ‘em and when tensioned properly they work great. C&S claims to shape them to specs so they’re ready to go right out of the box. I’ve got no complaints.
 

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Fitting a extractor is not rocket science (no offense to Steve). Pretty easy actually, and no, I have no idea what the dimensions are supposed to be, nor care.
No offense taken. In fact, I agree with nearly everything you said.
  • I have typically shown others how I do things by example.
  • . . . I have found that there are too many variables that can come into play . . .
  • So I can probably say that every extractor I have ever fit is slightly different . . .
  • And maybe that's why I like apprenticeships and mentoring.
Learning by doing especially if you have someone showing you how is something I know I've wished I'd had over the years. But that's not available to most people. Certainly not as many as are members of the various internet discussion forums. Wanting to help folks with what has seemed over the years to be a serious lack of understanding when it comes to extractors and fitting them I set about to shed enough light on the subject to allow others to gain some knowledge and be able to get their pistols to run better.

In my experience (I've been working with 1911s since 1973) there are two absolutely critical measurements that must exist for proper functioning of the extractor. One is deflection - it must not be more than .015" and I prefer no more than .010". The other is hook-to-breechface distance - it must not be less than .075" (for .45). Violate either of these measurements and you're tempting fate. I never try to eyeball these distances. I always use a gauge.

Having said all that I will also say that I never even attempt to measure the tension because as long as the deflection is kept to my minimum it is very difficult, almost impossible to bend the extractor enough to apply so much tension that feeding is compromised.

Also, I don't measure the various radii, angles, and lengths of the extractor. I just whack away until it fits.

However, everyone needs a starting point. Hence, the drawings and pictures in my extractor fitting post. As long as a new 1911 owner knows which end of the pistol is the dangerous end, he/she should be able to work their way through that post, gain an understanding of the part, and be able to correctly fit it.

No, fitting an extractor is not rocket science unless you've never fit one before.
 

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The Tinker
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Good points! As I have said before (ad nauseam) there is often more than one way to do something. And nothing wrong with using gauges if that's what you are comfortable with. Bob taught me a different way and it has worked for me since the early 80s (I shot a 45 in the Corps in the early 70s, but I wasn't working on them then, I was using them ;)

I have many faults, and one seems to be my forgetting that not everyone knows what I know. I will try to keep that in mind in the future, but no guarantees sir. ;)

But feel free to call me out if/when I do/say something stupid! :D
 
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