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Discussion Starter #1
New to me anyway...
1917 made in 1917. .45 acp of course.
I got it in the same deal where I got the Colt 1911 from 1919, but this one had to sit in layaway for a month.
It’s home now!
If you zoom in on the last photo, you can see some engraving.
Thanks for looking.



 

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Consider my signature line before replying . . . .
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Totally envious.

With that and your Xterra, you da mang . . . .
 
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That is a classic. Wish I still had mine!
Enjoy that!
 
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Very nice! I like N frame Smiths and I don’t mind the trench art at all.

I have a 1937 Brazilian (1917). I got it back in the late ‘80s when they were imported and sold for around $100.
I shoot Auto Rims through it almost exclusively.
9F0132ED-EAB1-406C-9138-FA7649BFE3F9.jpeg


I have the original grips but the modern targets are much more comfortable for me.
 

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Very nice, Tom! I’ve always had a hankering for a 1917 (45 ACP)! Just fun shooting! I’d say you did quite well. Congratulations!!
 

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That's neat, regret selling mine years ago.
Congrads
 
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The serial number shows it was shipped in January of 1919. The flaming bomb touch mark, left side by rear sight affirms that date. If you are interested, the lanyard loop and stud are still available.
I have several ACP revolvers. The old ones, pre WWII I treat to nothing more strenuous than hardball. They seem to like that. The postwar stuff gets a heavier loading and the revolvers with Model numbers, ie 22-4, 25-2, etc. can accept loads up to and equal to 45 Super.

Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The serial number shows it was shipped in January of 1919. The flaming bomb touch mark, left side by rear sight affirms that date. If you are interested, the lanyard loop and stud are still available.
I have several ACP revolvers. The old ones, pre WWII I treat to nothing more strenuous than hardball. They seem to like that. The postwar stuff gets a heavier loading and the revolvers with Model numbers, ie 22-4, 25-2, etc. can accept loads up to and equal to 45 Super.

Kevin
Thanks Kevin for the additional information!
I truly appreciate it.
 

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5340C590-8321-47E6-9151-0EC55D9BFA31.jpeg
040C4EC8-372E-4D7A-B273-B8BD42FD4A26.jpeg
I really enjoy ACP revolvers. My EDC is a 22-4. I have a few 4” barreled ACPs, a couple with 5 1/2” barrel and one with a 6 1/2” barrel. All get range time. The older ones, 1917, and 1917 Commercials get a diet of cast lead at hardball specs. I used to think you needed to cast the lead harder to grab the rifling. It is what Elmer and others wrote. Now I find that proper fit means as much to limit leading.

Post WWII ACP revolvers can handle hotter loads and the 625s and 22-4s can handle 45 Super loads. A bit more than I need or want but doable.

Kevin
 

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Just reread my post. Nothing like posting a photo and talking about everything but that revolver.

That is a Model 1917, built in very early 1918. It was used in WWI and then made it’s way to England and at some point got sold commercially in England. Then, somehow got back to the US.

Kevin
 

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1917s are lots of fun on the range with just the standard old load. The gun below was gifted to my older son by the widow of one of my best friends. It originally looked a little worse than the others above. My friend got it cheap, wanted a shooter that looked nice so he had it refinished and refreshed mechanically. The shop did a wonderful job on it, all the markings a very very clear and the blue is amazing, repro grips and a Tyler T top it off.

It came back from England as part of the Lend Lease program. It has a small "Not English Make" stamped on it.

My son is an Army E7 flight medic so the Army connection was an added bonus. I thought I had posted it before but I guess not.



 

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The “NOT ENGLISH MAKE” is a mark used when a foreign firearm leaves service and is sold commercially in England. At least that is how it was explained to me. Regardless, nice 1917!

If you go here and enter the serial, it will indicate when it was built.

http://oldguns.net/sn_php/milmods.htm

Kevin
 
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