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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,
I'm starting to do a little housekeeping on my old lathe.

I finally got to a 70's work light, I had pulled out of a trash can on a ship I was working on.

It was an original Chart Light, that had been used when the ship was built in Sweden in 1970!

Yes, the US Merchant Marines, are running ships that old to protect your, "Freedom". while the Chinese have the latest state of the art, equipment! (won't get into that!)

I actually rescued two of these lights and use the other, on my leather working bench.

The light was originally with the 220V European Plug end, and painted a horrid orange and white for some reason.

I stripped the light completely and spray painted a machine gray, put in a new light recepticle and cord for our 120V power.

I was going to get some GITS oil cups for the Timken Head Bearings for the lathe but when I saw there was not really the right size and the price, decided to just turn two oil caps.

The Timken Precision bearings in my lathe are now, unobtainable, from what I have seen although a lesser class bearing is.

I don't try my luck and always put in some med. spindle oil each time I run the lathe and have never had a problem.

Bought more paint and I'm going to paint the stout bench and oil pan so everything looks better.

Was thinking of getting a newer lathe but really do not see the reason, this one works fine and at this stage of the game is really all I need.

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Beautiful machine & killer job on the light fixture,
Our main lathe was made in 1940, all gear driven and a 12 foot bed. Bought it out of surplus in the 80's.
It spent 40+ years at sea on a ship.
Retired now and sold the business. Have to see if I can find some pics to scan into the computer.
Its a thing of industrial beauty just like yours. Plus how much it would it cost you in time & labor to replace it not even counting the price of the machine.
Unless your gonna get a milling machine/lathe combo the only thing that needs changed is moving that to my house. :ROFLMAO:

Have you tried searching the bearing based on dimensions rather than part number/application?
I learned years ago that it is sometimes easier just to give the dimensions to the bearing maker rather than trying to go by what its for.
Let them try to cross reference it based on measurements. Rare was the instances I couldnt source bearings in that manner.
Sometimes trying to match it to specific machines by name or part # muddies up the waters especially if its something old.
If you are retirement age even the lesser bearings will last the rest of your life I believe.
Just a thought.
 

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The Tinker
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Just a FYI, but back when I had a little SB lathe (not old iron though), I kept forgetting to add oil to the headstock bearings, so I managed to find these oilers somewhere on the internet (England?). Made some adapters for them and they worked very well.

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IMO there is nothing wrong with old iron if it does what you want it to do and hits the accuracy you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Beautiful machine & killer job on the light fixture,
Our main lathe was made in 1940, all gear driven and a 12 foot bed. Bought it out of surplus in the 80's.
It spent 40+ years at sea on a ship.
Retired now and sold the business. Have to see if I can find some pics to scan into the computer.
Its a thing of industrial beauty just like yours. Plus how much it would it cost you in time & labor to replace it not even counting the price of the machine.
Unless your gonna get a milling machine/lathe combo the only thing that needs changed is moving that to my house. :ROFLMAO:

Have you tried searching the bearing based on dimensions rather than part number/application?
I learned years ago that it is sometimes easier just to give the dimensions to the bearing maker rather than trying to go by what its for.
Let them try to cross reference it based on measurements. Rare was the instances I couldnt source bearings in that manner.
Sometimes trying to match it to specific machines by name or part # muddies up the waters especially if its something old.
If you are retirement age even the lesser bearings will last the rest of your life I believe.
Just a thought.
Hi,
Thanks, yes I am now retired after 40 years in the Merchant Marine.

No, I do not need bearings for the Clausing, and glad of it.

Talked yesterday to the Gentleman, that sold it to me, and the bearings just happened to come up in conversation.

I don't baby the lathe and run it fast with carbide tooling, but I make sure I do my part and give it attention, before starting each day.

Would love to see pics of the lathe you used aboard ship.

Usually what I saw on ships, were VERY big lathes, which make sense, seeing what we used to have to turn, for those big engines and motors.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just a FYI, but back when I had a little SB lathe (not old iron though), I kept forgetting to add oil to the headstock bearings, so I managed to find these oilers somewhere on the internet (England?). Made some adapters for them and they worked very well.

View attachment 748925

IMO there is nothing wrong with old iron if it does what you want it to do and hits the accuracy you want.
Hi,
Yes, those are nice, and I actually thought of that, but have been doing it my way for years, so just decided to make some caps, more handy, to take off and on, than just a screwed in bolt.

That's a very nice lathe!

I love lathes, and when I first learned to cut threads, saw it as somewhat magical...still do!
 

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Hi,
Thanks, yes I am now retired after 40 years in the Merchant Marine.

No, I do not need bearings for the Clausing, and glad of it.

Talked yesterday to the Gentleman, that sold it to me, and the bearings just happened to come up in conversation.

I don't baby the lathe and run it fast with carbide tooling, but I make sure I do my part and give it attention, before starting each day.

Would love to see pics of the lathe you used aboard ship.

Usually what I saw on ships, were VERY big lathes, which make sense, seeing what we used to have to turn, for those big engines and motors.

Just to be clear... I personaly never used it aboard ship but that it came off of a ship.
We bought it from Mil surplus. In our shop it mostly made drive lines, BIG ones lol
I dont want anyone thinking I served when I didnt. Too much respect for those who did.
 

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The Tinker
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I LOVE looking at these machines... my porn lol
Someone should start a machine pic thread.
My lathe and mill are small(er) machines that are more modern with VFDs, variable speed, and digital readouts. They are from Taiwan though, so they have high grade Meehanite castings and are very accurate. And came with a 5 year warranty! (that I never needed)

I didn't want older machines that I might have to rebuild, I wanted machines that would allow me to do my hobby machining/gunsmithing! :)

I do like looking at Old Iron though. Maybe if I had more money and a larger shop... :LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi,
Here is a, "Sea Story".

I was aboard a Bulk Carrier, carrying Grain to Egypt. (US AID)

The Chief Engineer was pretty good guy and he asked me if I could run a lathe.

He wanted some small, 1/2" couplings made to repair a small hydraulic unit, for opening and closing valves.

He had tried to just buy the couplings, but could not find them, as they were BSP threads. (British Standard Pipe)

He did however, figure out the tap that was needed and had obtained that and that was what he handed me...

The interesting part is the lathe was about 12 feet long and you needed a chain hoist to change out the chuck!

Anyway, I turned the piece, got the right drill to fit the tap, tapped them in the lathe so they would be straight, and made about five of the couplings, including two flats, so you could get a wrench on it.

He was pleased and later in the trip I came across a Dorian Tool, tool holder, that was WAY to small, for the lathe we had.

I asked him about it and he said someone had made a mistake when they ordered it years ago.

Asked me, if I could use it, as it would eventually, get thrown in the trash can anyway, and I said yes, and thank you!

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More money and a larger shop! That always seems to be what it comes down to. lol
We built a new shop back in 96, 60x40 and I remember us walking around inside and marveling at how huge it was compared to our old shop etc. then we moved all our crap in and was like where the hell where did the shop go. :ROFLMAO:
Once the boxes were along one wall and the machines along the other we could get 2 graders in but it was only 5 feet from the grader to the tool box fronts, BEFORE you opened the drawers lol
On the machine side we had plenty of room for safety reasons of course but that box side was tight.
Good Times!

Here is one I could find of the box side of the shop.
Ignore the mess it got busy at times. The air compressors were temporary as we were still building the shipping container outside for the big one.

Seagiant notice the chain hoist you speak of LOL
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi,
NICE Shop!

Yep, chain hoists have saved many a back! (not mine, but...)

I'm now trying to sale a few things, to get more room in my small shop and still want to set up my small Blacksmith Operation again, if I can find the space?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have a Dorian BXA on my lathe and love it. Good stuff. (y)
Hi,
Yes, Dorian Tool is good stuff and I was happy to get it.

I got a piece of cast steel from a friend to make some tool holders for it on the Bridgeport.

The Chi-Com holders work, but I wanted to see if I could make my own and now have the steel I needed.

This piece of steel was actually an elevator weight, but should make nice holders!

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Here are a couple pics so you guys can get idea of what we did.

Axles out from under an aircraft tug. Rated to pull a fully loaded C-30 up a 1% grade
Bought the whole tug for 5,000 at AF base auction. 30,000 a pair new from ZF in Germany for the axles only.
Restored to perfection. Notice the 4 wheel hydraulic steering and the planetary hub. No external brake parts exposed. 5 steels and 4 friction disks, all in the hub.
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These are the machines we built for the deep off road recovery arm of the business using same axles.
Our hunting rigs also lol
We had to hand dig the path in these pics to get around the mountain ridge. Its 150 foot drop from the right side edge.
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Notice he is by himself in the cab :ROFLMAO:
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Without the 4 wheel steering this would have been impossible.
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Anyways that the sort of stuff we did. We made our money repairing heavy equipment, machine shop services, snow removal etc.
These rigs allowed us to work deep in the bush.
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We were the only game in the state so life & money was good.
I will find more pics of the shop equipment and post them when I do. At least then I will be back on topic lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi,
To keep the ball rolling, here is a 40's Delta DP-220 Drill press.

This thing was a mess, and after I got into it...

Found out that the motor was junk and replaced it.

It is only a 1/3 HP, but that is what the original was.

It's for punching holes, if I want anything better I go to the Mill.

The Delta, replaced a 1955 Craftsman, made by King Seeley, that I used for 25 years.

I replaced the bearings in the Delta and the Craftsman, but the Delta is smoother and quieter...

So, I sold the Craftsman for what I had in it! ($100)
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi,
There is an Industrial Warehouse, about 30 miles from me I drop into every now and then.

They carry a lot of used equipment, steel, metal, tools, ect.

Saw this 1940's Wellsaw, one day, and got the manager to fire it up.

It made a clicking sound in the gearbox that all could hear, so knew repairs were in order.

On top of that it had a 3PH Motor.

Called Wellsaw and the nice lady said,"Sir, we still support that saw fully, and anything you need, we have it!"

So, between the noisy gearbox, and the 3PH Motor, bought it quite cheap and took it home.

It had a gear in the gearbox missing some teeth and it was full of dirt.

I did not paint the saw, except for the chip pan and completely rebuilt the gearbox and added a real cast iron pully to the motor as it's suppose to have.

It also needed some roller guides and got everything I needed from Wellsaw.

It's tuned up now and cuts like a laser, I use the same RPC that I built for the 3PH Bridgeport, to run the saw.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi,
A lot of times, with old equipment.

I will just get it back to running, clean it up and call it a day but...

Sometimes, the condition or paint is so bad it begs to be completely refurbished.

Your Dalton, would be such a case.

I took a course, or Seminar, on Scraping Machinery, to get it back to true, on the Ways...

But that is a labor of love, and time consuming if done correctly, and requires certain tools, and knowledge!

 

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Yeah I have seen some really nice restored ones. I am getting pieces together and such, and have the lathe running. I really need to get a leather or serpentine belt on it.
 
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