Practical Concealed Carry Course

Discussion in 'Training' started by E39, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. E39

    E39 Supporting Addict Supporting Addict

    216
    Oct 15, 2011
    4 hour course at my local range. Good stuff. Mostly holster work (this was my first time with a holster). My Kelley Swift OWB worked great. Now need to order a mag carrier from Kelley as the plastic Springfield carrier was absolute crap. The carrier actually dislodged rounds from the mag (yes, it was adjusted). All work was down range at 7'-10'. Even did close quarters (about 3') with one hand firing from a position with the butt of the gun held against the ribcage and another with two hand against the chest. Most techniques use Combat Focus Shooting (I.C.E.) techniques.

    Would have been a lot more fun if I didn't have 12-15 FTF and at least 7 FTE (out of 125 rounds).
     
  2. knedrgr

    knedrgr Low capacity, low tech...

    Aug 15, 2011
    which gun did you use to take the course?
     

  3. E39

    E39 Supporting Addict Supporting Addict

    216
    Oct 15, 2011
    I have a Springfield Loaded (Combat version). It's the only gun I own.
     
  4. knedrgr

    knedrgr Low capacity, low tech...

    Aug 15, 2011
    Check your mags.

    Check your extractor for correct tension, clocking in the slide.

    Check your firing pin for a loose fitting, thus causing your extractor to clock in the slide.
     
  5. TSiWRX

    TSiWRX Member

    861
    Aug 21, 2011
    Good for you, E39! :smile:

    Actually, I think it's better that you get more malfunction practice. :smile:

    OK, that needs to be expanded a bit - certainly, it's something that we don't want to happen, when we're out on the streets - so it's good that you're seeing it in your gun, in a training atmosphere, now. Also, in the streets is not the time to learn how to manipulate your weapon under stress, and malfunction clearances are among the most demanding set of manipulations that you'll learn: once again, the training atmosphere, with its self/instructor-induced stress, is the perfect time to practice.

    Of-course, unless you're specifically practicing malfunction clearances, you don't want to have too, too many. Ostensibly, you're there to learn how to shoot as well as a bunch of other skills (positions, movement, etc.) - and having too many issues does cut into your actual skills-learning time.
     
  6. E39

    E39 Supporting Addict Supporting Addict

    216
    Oct 15, 2011
    Yeah, imagine my surprise when I pulled the trigger and it went "click". I know I had racked the slide on a full mag. Nothing like the rest of the line (holding Glocks) waiting for the old guy with the old-style gun trying to kill the target! So you're right - I now have muscle memory of clearing malfunctions. One of the instructors was sure he had a new buyer for a polymer pistol.

    On the good side I thought I did well with the draw. Too bad I have to yell BANG BANG!

    Next step in training is the 4 hour Introduction to Combat Focus Shooting. After that it would be the full 2-3 day thing with Rob and I'm not ready for that. Maybe in a few years but not anytime soon.
     
  7. TSiWRX

    TSiWRX Member

    861
    Aug 21, 2011
    Ain't nothin' wrong with the 1911. Malfunctions can and will happen to any and all guns. It's just a fact of life. :smile: The problem with a lot of us high-capacity Tupperware owners is that we come to rely on the "trigger makes it go bang all the time" feeling that we become lax on our malfunction remediation; or, alternatively, like me, start relying entirely too much on capacity.

    Don't sell yourself short, bruddah. :wink:

    Besides, it's all too easy to sit and become complacent at a level where you're comfortable. Pushing that boundary of being uncomfortably stressed (but still safe, because you'll have a lot of good eyes on you) is what's going to drive improvement. :smile:
     

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