Pre/over travel

Discussion in 'Beginner's Corner' started by SaltOTE, Nov 23, 2018.

  1. SaltOTE

    SaltOTE New Member

    16
    Oct 30, 2018
    I read somewhere that an “old-school” way of adjusting pre-travel was to weld additional metal to the rear of the trigger bow and then fine tune by filing off excess. This seems like a better fix than welding a bump (or bending adjustment tabs) at the front of the bow, especially in cases like mine where the least OVERTRAVEL adjustment still leaves the sear in a position to be struck by the first click shelf of the hammer. This is on an SA TRP. It’s not the hammer safety notch. It’s the very first click when I manually cock the hammer, some further safety I suppose, but it stands out about 20 thousandths further than the hammer hooks. Any thoughts? Please and thank you!
     
  2. pistolwretch

    pistolwretch Dremel jockey Supporting Addict

    Aug 26, 2011
    Trigger travel might be restricted by the grip safety.
     
    TangoWhiskeyFoxtrot likes this.

  3. Integrity Arms

    Integrity Arms 1911 Pistol Smith

    Mar 20, 2017
    Are You saying when you to to pull the trigger the hammer catches in that first click notch, and not going all the way down to discharge the round? Or that when you take the over travel screw in as far as you can and then back it off it still engages that notch on the way down?
     
  4. SaltOTE

    SaltOTE New Member

    16
    Oct 30, 2018
    When I dry fire, the hammer falls. But when I manually lower the hammer, it rubs on that shelf, enough to come to rest on it. So, at speed it’s able fire, but it’s hitting the sear nose hard enough to mar the contact surfaces. As soon as I noticed this, I backed off the overtravel screw and it no longer rubs there, but it also doesn’t leave me with as neat a trigger pull. That’s why I’m considering adding some thickness to the back of the bow. Either that or filing that shelf off the hammer, which doesn’t seem like a good idea
     
  5. Dave Jessee

    Dave Jessee Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    823
    Dec 31, 2014
    A good trigger, with pre-travel tabs and an over travel screw, has always worked very well for me. As Pistol Wrench says the grip safety can be a consideration.
     
  6. Integrity Arms

    Integrity Arms 1911 Pistol Smith

    Mar 20, 2017
    That is some sort if secondary safety notch that as far as I know every SA, guns has. So, I wouldn't think the hammer would be the issue. Every gun should have a certain amount of over travel, I could see the beavertail safety also possibly being the culprit, but the trigger bow could possibly need stretched a piece to. The over travel screw shouldn't change your initial take up.
     
  7. switchback

    switchback Well-Known Member

    Jun 2, 2014
    Not sure about the conditions described, but triggers require both pretravel and overtravel, to operate in a les than friendly environment. SAI 1911s do have an extra click to them, always have far as I know. OP do you have a different trigger to install? Perhaps a GI type without overtravel screw? Have you adjusted your SAI trigger with overtravel screw properly? I believe the C&S triggers have trigger bow that is longer. SAI has the best CS in the business, there is your best option.
     
  8. SaltOTE

    SaltOTE New Member

    16
    Oct 30, 2018
    Thanks guys. Some good info there
     
  9. EvolutionArmory

    EvolutionArmory Well-Known Member

    Sep 9, 2011
    Overtravel is limited by 2 possible parts. The first is any type of stop on the trigger shoe, be it a screw or pad that is stopped by the mag catch.

    The second is the grip safety arm as pointed out by Chuck.

    To see if your grip safety is limiting trigger travel is easy. Remove it and set proper overtravel with the trigger screw if it is equipped with one. Once that is set so your sear doesn’t rub your hammer hooks, reinstall your grip safety and see if the sear is now hitting the hooks. If they are, you need to file back the grip safety blocking area to allow more trigger travel.
     
  10. AlchemyCustomWeaponry

    AlchemyCustomWeaponry Crabby Old Gunsmith

    Nov 4, 2011
    Not that this is the case but I have also seen the disconnector have the ability to limit overtravel as well. I haven't seen it much, but I've seen it.
     
  11. SaltOTE

    SaltOTE New Member

    16
    Oct 30, 2018
    Ok. Thanks again
     
  12. SaltOTE

    SaltOTE New Member

    16
    Oct 30, 2018
    I’m still curious about adjusting pre-travel by moving the trigger forward (again, by adding to the BACK of the bow), rather than moving it backward with adjustment tabs.
     
  13. Integrity Arms

    Integrity Arms 1911 Pistol Smith

    Mar 20, 2017
    The way your speaking of was the oldschool way of adjusting a trigger when no screw was provided and is a pretty intricate application, I would do exactly as Evolution Armory has suggested as well as Chuck, I have seen trigger bows out of square cause these same issues but, at this point my bet is on the grip safety..as well.
     
    TangoWhiskeyFoxtrot likes this.
  14. EvolutionArmory

    EvolutionArmory Well-Known Member

    Sep 9, 2011
    Whatever works. I think it’s far more simple to just throw a dot of weld or solder on the front of the bow and file it down perfect or cut out a tab you can adjust.

    The best part is that there’s so many great triggers out there that already come with tabs to adjust preinstalled. For $35 bucks why wouldn’t you just replace the trigger?
     
    Steve Owens likes this.
  15. AlchemyCustomWeaponry

    AlchemyCustomWeaponry Crabby Old Gunsmith

    Nov 4, 2011
    Or...you can peen a bump into the back of the trigger bow. Put the back of the trigger bow on a thick piece of leather...preferably on the anvil part of your vise and then use a sharpened punch to swage a raised dot into the back of the bow. This is a super-old school trick that I have not seen a whole lot of.

    I must caution you on removing too much takeup as that can lead to hammer follow, doubling, and full auto fun and frolic if you're not careful.
     
    Steve Owens likes this.
  16. David R

    David R Well-Known Member

    384
    Oct 7, 2018
    I used a feeler gauge soldered to the back of the trigger bow. You can get exact thickness. Just be sure to make it wide enough to include the grip safety.

    New triggers are the balls.

    David
     

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