Replacement/fix/maintenance 1911 kit

Discussion in '1911 Gunsmithing' started by JesseJ, Dec 24, 2019.

  1. JesseJ

    JesseJ New Member

    11
    Oct 30, 2019
    What do you guys recommend to have on hand for maintaining and fixing 1911s, for high volume shooters?
     
  2. 1911mechanik

    1911mechanik Christ is my front sight.

    787
    Apr 29, 2016
    Well for maintaining it I'd say some basic stuff: maybe a bushing wrench, a small brush, a brass bore brush, good lubricant and cleaning agent, and recoil springs for replacement. As far as fixing.....well that's a different story. Depends on what's wrong and what you refer to as fixing. I've sold guns, lots of them, to buy tools to fix 1911s so there's a lot of depth to that particular pool.
     
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  3. jcc7x7

    jcc7x7 Well-Known Member

    Nov 2, 2019
    For general use recoil springs.
    When I travel to a match, if I don't take a 2nd gun, I have a fitted ignition set and sear spring. and recoil springs.
    Honestly they don't go down very often.
    Proof the pistol and then don't concern yourself with it.
    Clean it, lube it and change the recoil spring occasionally.
     
  4. simonp

    simonp Well-Known Member

    May 27, 2016
    Add to the above, in my bag I have

    1. extra extractor
    2. extra fibre optics, with clippers and matches to replace the front sight if need be
    3. pretty sure I have extra firing pin stop and pin though ive never need either
    4. I use wolff recoil springs so that means each comes with an extra firing pin spring
    5. hammer and squib rods
     
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  5. jcc7x7

    jcc7x7 Well-Known Member

    Nov 2, 2019
    Yep! Agree and I've got that stuff in my range bag also, good info!
     
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  6. bnaples

    bnaples Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2013
  7. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    My primary go-to tools (in no particular order):

    • Screwdriver with interchangeable tips.
    • Small ball peen hammer
    • Wheeler Universal armorsB block
    • Steel AND brass pin punch sets
    • Needle nose pliars
    • Weigand extractor tensioning kit
    • Lyman Trigger pull gauge
    • Digital micrometer
    • AVID 1911 Smart Wrench (bushing wrench)
    • Sear / Trigger alignment block
    • Chambers 1911 alignment tools
    • Various spooge tools (Pachmayr, 10-8, noname brass flat blades)
    • Black & Decker Workmate Bench Vise (#79-025, Type 1)
    • Ball end hex wrench sets (English and metric)
    • Files, files, files
    • Stones, stones, stones
    • Empty plastic mainspring housing
    • Small set of jewelers screwdrivers (flat blade and phillips)
    • Multiple bent paperclips (bull barrel disassembly tools)
    • Hoppe's No. 9 (cleaning solution and oil)
    • Birchwood Casey Aluminum Black, Cold Blue, etc.
    • Renaissance Wax
    • Lint free cloths
    • Zoid's Miracle Polishing Cloths
    • Dykem
    • A few sharp knives

    I am sure there is something that I am forgetting.
     
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  8. jjfitch

    jjfitch Well-Known Member

    732
    Mar 26, 2012
    You forgot a deep credit card and an understanding wife!
    A motorhome for travelling to matches helped her "understanding! :)
     
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  9. HooDoo Man

    HooDoo Man Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Dec 26, 2017
    A Good Gunsmith on Retainer.
     
  10. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    I only listed what I currently posses . . . . . . . . :rolleyes:

    Don't want to misrepresent myself, don'cha know . . . . . . .
     
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  11. JET55

    JET55 Active Member

    149
    Nov 22, 2019
    I'm really new to working on the 1911. And while I haven't really bought a lot of tools yet, I've managed to accumulate a few. Out of everything I've bought so far the pin gauge set I bought has proven to be most valuable.

    When I installed the beavertail on my first build i used smaller pins to keep the BT in while determining how much material to take off the tangs. Once I had the small pin free in the holes I would install the larger pin until I worked up to the thumb safety itself.

    And being able to tell if a frame hole is drilled to the right size is invaluable. On my Nighthawk frame the hole for the sear pin seemed way too small, like .006 too small. I used the biggest possible pin I could install, .103? And then pushed it trough with a brass hammer. A big chunk of drilling remnant pushed out with it. Then a .104 and so own until I got close to the correct size.
     
  12. simonp

    simonp Well-Known Member

    May 27, 2016
    Renaissance wax- for??


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
  13. Jrock9

    Jrock9 Well-Known Member

    585
    Sep 3, 2019
    Fancy grips like ivory and mammoth tooth.
     
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  14. HooDoo Man

    HooDoo Man Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Dec 26, 2017
    Renaissance Wax, for getting your Nickel plated handguns so Beautiful that when you get a fingerprint on them you get Pissed off.
     
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  15. pistolwretch

    pistolwretch Dremel jockey Supporting Addict

    Aug 26, 2011
    I've seen more extractor failures/breakages than anything else by a large margin.
    Well.....except for squibs!

    For me, 'in the field' or at a match:
    Squib rod.
    Spare tuned extractor.

    Of course back at the shop I got a LOT of stuff.

    Other 'not so common' parts failures:
    Colt factory 45acp slide stops. The inner lobe breaks off.
    First generation cast Ed Brown thumb safeties. Break a bit behind where the shaft meets the plate.
    Colt factory firing pin stops. High round counts. Usually crack but rarely totally fail.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2019
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  16. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014

    RenWax bluffs up to a nice sheen on polished wood, metal, bone and ivory. It dries hard and resists fingerprints.

    Advertising legend has it that museums use it to protect valuable exhibits from fingerprints.

    I've found that it works well as advertised. A LOT of S&W revolver collectors I know swear by it. It seems to work well on blued guns as well.
     
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  17. WC145

    WC145 Every day is Saturday and every night's a party!

    Jan 1, 2013
    Spare 1911s. I always take an extra gun to matches and keep extras in the safe. Just in case.;)
     

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