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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been shooting one of the newer 686+ 3 inch barrel for a little while, it has @ 800 rounds through it to help mate the parts a bit. The trigger on this one is nice and smooth, no grit, grinding or hitches but has (in typical S&W style) a horrific 14 pound double action pull and single action 5 pound pull. Here is the contestant...

I'm also going to remove the Hillary Hole because it is HIDEOUS...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Going to install this plug...


And a Wilson Combat Custom Tuned Spring Kit which includes a reduced power mainspring/strut and reduced power rebound slide spring. The kit includes 3 rebound spring (12#, 13#, and 14#). I'll shoot for middle of the road and use the 13 pound spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Take out all side plate screws using properly fitted screwdrivers so you don't muck up the screws or frame and label them so they go back in the same holes; some are different sizes (the yoke screw)...
[/IMG]

Tap the back of the frame in the grip area with something that won't mar the finish (piece of PVC piping, plastic screwdriver handle, nylon mallet, etc) and the side plate will work it's way loose and pop off. When it looks like this remove it...
[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First piece we are going to remove is the hammer block which blocks the hammer from striking the firing pin until the trigger is pulled.

A lot of times the hammer block falls off or gets stuck to the back of the side plate when the plate is removed. It sits in this cutout in the slide plate and rides up and down as the trigger is pulled and released. I'll show how it goes in later and where it attaches/inserts over the rebound slide pin. As the trigger is pulled the rebound slide moves back and draws the top of the hammer block down so the hammer can strike the firing pin; the reverse occurs when the trigger is release and the rebound slide moves forward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Next we are going to back out the strain screw that puts tension on the mainspring...this can be adjusted too for trigger pull. If you look closely you can see where the strut is not place in correctly from the factory (top left of pic at bottom of grip frame you can see it sticks out slightly to the left side; it should be even on both sides of the frame and not stick out towards one side). The strut should be even on both sides of the frame not sticking out one side as this one is.

Once the strain screw is backed off the mainspring can be removed. Take note of how the mainspring hooks at the top of the mainspring attach to the stirrup studs; this will come in handy later...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Time to remove the hammer assembly. Gently pull back on the trigger until the hammer is free of the D/A, S/A sear engagement. You can tell when this occurs as the parts will free up and the hammer will move/rotate freely around the hammer stud pin...

At this point you can pull it up and off the stud pin which is the pin that is attached to/part of the frame. It may require a little wiggling to get it up and off. Be careful not to pull the trigger too far and cause the hammer to drop while doing this. A little trick for those who are dexterity challenged is to pull the trigger back where the hammer is free and use a twist tie attached to the back of the trigger guard and twist it around the trigger to hold it in place; this will free up both hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The double action sear strut is spring loaded in the hammer assembly; do not take this apart.

Note the hammer stirrup attachment orientation as this often falls off; this is where the mainspring hammer hooks attach...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Next we're going to remove the rebound slide/spring assembly. This also attaches to a frame stud and there is a hefty spring in there.

I like the SmithMaster Tool as it makes removal easy...

The tool has 2 different shaped ends one side is for removing the rebound slide and the other end used to re-insert it back into the frame. Used this hooked end which allows the rebound spring to be compressed beyond the frame stud so the slide can be lifted up off the stud.

Keep a thumb over the spring end or the spring can launch across the room or house depending on it's trajectory...

And the rebound slide is out. We will switch out that spring to a reduced power spring...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In case you haven't noticed there are a lot of MIM parts (hammer and this rebound slide). Rebound slide has some rough spots which need to be smoothed/polished. We are specifically concentrating on the bottom and back of the rebound slide where it contacts the frame. You can check the wear pattern on both the slide and inside the frame. Smoothing this piece up helps smooth out the trigger pull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Now we are taking out the trigger assembly...it also attaches to a frame stud...

Pull the hand back out of the hand frame window which will free the trigger assembly for removal. Then slide the trigger assembly up and off it's frame stud. Be EXTREMELY CAREFUL to keep the hand attached to the trigger assembly. It is attached to 2 tiny studs on the back of that assembly between which rides a torsion spring that is an absolute biotch to get back in place. Keep your fingers over the hand while removing this assembly to keep it from coming apart.

The hand extends through the hand frame window here and articulates with the cylinder star ratchet surfaces. As the trigger is pulled rearward the hand moves up and out through the window, engages the ratchet surface and rotates the cylinder. You can also see the cylinder stop stud that engages the cylinder locking slots thereby preventing cylinder rotation during firing (stud poking out of lower inside frame). When the timing is off those locking slots get peened/damaged. You can fit an oversized cylinder stop stud and hand to correct timing issues but that is way off track from what we are doing here today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Trigger assembly removed. Note orientation of parts should it come apart.

This trigger lever plunger comes out (usually falls out). Note it's orientation in the trigger assembly.


The other end rides in that little notch in the front of your rebound slide and
pushes the rebound slide back when the trigger is pulled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Take out the cylinder release screw and remove cylinder release.


Now take off the cylinder. The cylinder and yoke can be slid off the frame as a unit by holding both and moving them forward towards the barrel until they are clear...

[/IMG]

Good time to pull cylinder off clean the assembly and gas rings and check yoke for any burrs that need to be dressed. This one's cylinder freely spins and just needed to be cleaned up a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Time to take out the bolt bar...

The bolt bar has a TINY SPRING and plunger in the end that rests in the frame slot in the back (towards grip end of gun). To remove pull back (towards grip end), compressing the plunger and spring into the frame, clearing the bolt from it's frame window/hole and lift the bolt bar up and back being careful not to launch that spring. It is tiny and can take a long time to find crawling around the floor on your hands and knees with a flashlight (ask me how I know).

You can see where the bolt extends through the frame window.

Never force anything when you are trying to remove it. Some bolt bars are tightly fit and take some finessing before they will come out, take your time.
End with plunger and TINY spring. Be careful.
[/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
All the stuff we've taken out...

Now time to get rid of the dreaded lock...

All the offending pieces. From left to right... the locking flag that goes up when the lock is engaged, the tiny spade shaped gizmo (a S&W technical term) that engages and moves flag up and down when lock is rotated, and most importantly the retaining piece (flat horseshoe shaped retaining part with spring). We are going to reuse this spring so be careful not to damage it when it is removed. Pic below shows orientation of parts when lock is disengaged...

and when it is engaged...

Top side view of locking flag...

And here is what this useless POS looks like when the lock is engaged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Getting this crap out is no easy task...
The locking flag can simply be pulled out at this point...

It has a retaining spring/lever in the bottom...

My apologies for this part as the pointer is pointing to the wrong place. Behind the spade shaped piece is a horshoe shaped piece with a spring that looks like this...

You can see where it rides in it's slot, the stud end has this spring on it's end...

See those 2 tiny indents in the horse shoe shaped part..you have to use a dental pick tool (or similiar pointy object) to get behind the spade shaped piece and into the indent in the horshoe shaped piece and compress the spring backwards freeing the horseshoe shaped piece from the cutout slot in the lock plug. Once this is accomplished (piece is fully compressed releasing the lock plug) the lock plug can be pulled up and out of the gun with a pair of needle nose pliers.
 
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