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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Springfield armory EMP4. I go to 2 different ranges to shoot, outdoor and indoor. My question is when I go to the outdoor range I have to do a 6 o'clock sight picture 6" low to hit in the bullseye. When I go to the indoor range I only have to aim about 3" low to hit the bullseye.. What's going on.. The distance at both ranges is 10 yards. When I shoot my glock this doesn't happened..Any thoughts.
Thank you
 

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Eddie Van Halen
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Wear contact lenses/glasses? Astigmatism? Fiber optic front sight?

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Glare on Front (Rear) sight(s) outdoors?
Old saying; "gun will shoot AWAY from glare". Usually noticed in a windage/horizontal error however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Maybe I should add that at the outside range the target is about knee high. The indoor range the target is level.
 

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Every day is Saturday and every night's a party!
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Lights up sights up, is what we were always told.
What is that supposed to mean? I've been shooting almost 50 years with many years of military and LE training and have never heard that one.

OP- Perhaps you're setting your front sight differently in the rear notch because the different lighting is increasing or decreasing the intensity of the fiber optic. Maybe you can try a little bit of electrical tape over the fiber optic so the sight is just black and see how you shoot.
I have an EMP4 that my son shoots in USPSA and if shoots to POA. I blacked out the white dots on the rear sight because he was spending to much time trying to line the fiber optic up with them, blacking them out allowed him to concentrate on the front sight without distraction.
 

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It means that your eyes see the sight picture differently depending on the lighting conditions. We were told the brighter the lighting the more the front sight needs to be raised or the rear lowered. If you notice the OP has to aim lower with outdoor lighting than indoors. There's more science behind it than I can explain but there is plenty of info on the web about it.
 

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Interesting to say the least. Learned something new today.
 

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Every day is Saturday and every night's a party!
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It means that your eyes see the sight picture differently depending on the lighting conditions. We were told the brighter the lighting the more the front sight needs to be raised or the rear lowered. If you notice the OP has to aim lower with outdoor lighting than indoors. There's more science behind it than I can explain but there is plenty of info on the web about it.
Interesting concept, I've read up on the phrase a bit and what I've found is that it comes from rifle shooting and how your eye sees the front sight depending on lighting. Personally, I've never experienced issues like this and I have shot and hunted in just about every lighting one could imagine. Regardless, nothing I read would account for a 3"-6" variation in hold to hit the bullseye at 10 yards, even if one target is set at eye level and the other is at knee height. Perhaps the OP should have a couple of other people shoot his gun to see where it hits for them. Since the sights aren't being changed or adjusted, one can assume it is a shooter issue as opposed to a gun issue.
 

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@WC145 It's more than a concept. If you think about the difference in a pistol and a rifle the sight radius is just longer in the rifle. A slight sight misalignment with a pistol extrapolates greatly even at a short distance. In my younger years I shot a lot of steel and bullseye at the Ft. Worth Rifle and Pistol Club with a S&W model 52 and a S&W model 41. There were a few shooters that were Camp Perry regulars and some good smiths that were members when I was and this was a known issue. I'd say that this issue might really only show up in a precision shooting scenario such as bullseye but I thought I'd throw it out there since there is a definite difference in the OP's POI depending on lighting conditions. You kind of answered the OP when you said:
OP- Perhaps you're setting your front sight differently in the rear notch because the different lighting is increasing or decreasing the intensity of the fiber optic. Maybe you can try a little bit of electrical tape over the fiber optic so the sight is just black and see how you shoot.
 
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