Slide ID

Discussion in 'Beginner's Corner' started by acesover, Mar 29, 2019.

  1. acesover

    acesover Well-Known Member

    361
    Dec 26, 2018
    I was given this slide a long time ago and was wondering if it's just a regular slide that was available commercially or not. The picture shows the Colt patents on the side pictured, and nothing on the other side. I put it on my Series 70 and it functions fine. 20190329_182411.jpg
     
    KS95B40 likes this.
  2. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    Show the whole slide, both sides if you could.

    Looks like it could be a an early military slide in amazingly good condition.
     

  3. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    This is a refinish 1918 with the same left side roll marks.

    Screenshot_20190329-214238.png

    Screenshot_20190329-214259.png

    No roll marks on the right side may indicate that it came from a commercial model from that vintage.

    I don't think they sold parts back then. Most likely came off of a complete gun.
     
    KS95B40 likes this.
  4. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    Here are photos of my 1917 Colt Commercial. It has the caliber marked on the right side and the rampant pony is behind the serrations.


    Colt 1917-005.jpg



    Colt 1917-007.jpg

    Colt 1917-010.jpg
     
    Slapshot, limbkiller, KS95B40 and 2 others like this.
  5. acesover

    acesover Well-Known Member

    361
    Dec 26, 2018
    There is nothing on the other side at all, and the pic shows everything that is roll marked on the slide. It was given to me by a Coast Guard armorer back in the 80's.
     
  6. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    The reason for wanting to see the whole slide, both sides is that will help nail down the identification of the year of production. The sights changed slightly over time. Those markings began in 1918 but almost all slides were marked with MODEL OF 1911.U.S.ARMY or MODEL OF 1911.U.S.NAVY.

    There are periods of slides guns with unmarked right hand slides that were shipped to Canada under the Lend-Lease Act of 1941. These slides with have specific geometric changes to the front taper of the slide (the area below).

    upload_2019-3-30_10-28-42.png

    IMG_20190330_103345.jpg


    Those roll marks bridged the transition from the M1911 to the M1911A1. Colt didn't start heat treating their slides until around 1924 or so, and more areas of the slides were hardened as the US entered into WWII. The reason your Coast Guard buddy gave you this slide may be due to it's estimated data of manufacture. If it were pre-1924, the USGC may not have wanted to rehab a service pistol with this slide.

    But I cannot do any additional research with the limited images you have given. If you are "worried" about someone seeing the serial number of your gun, take the slide off the frame. Otherwise, all I can tell you is that your slide was possibly made as early as 1918 and as late as 1943 from the evidence I can find from Clawson's book. The lack of right side markings make this slide pretty unusual. It may indicate that the gun this slide was on could have gone to Canada as a part of the Lend Lease program. How it got back to the US would be unknown.

    It is obviously NOT from a commercial Colt evidenced by the clean right hand side (that we haven't seen).

    Anything further would be speculation on my part.

    Z
     
    Slapshot and KS95B40 like this.
  7. acesover

    acesover Well-Known Member

    361
    Dec 26, 2018
    Thank you for the info! I will get a picture of both slide sides and post it up. One thing I noticed in the picture from the book was that there seems to be something stamped on the slide to the rear of the cocking serrations which mine does not have. Will get some pics soon.
     
  8. ZoidMeister

    ZoidMeister Consider my signature line before replying . . . .

    Dec 4, 2014
    That would be the commercial proof mark applied in England in 1953. I'm not sure if that was applied to all lend lease pistols or just those with a secondary transfer to England.
     
  9. acesover

    acesover Well-Known Member

    361
    Dec 26, 2018
    Pics of both sides of the slide in question and the original slide.
     

    Attached Files:

You need 3 posts to add links to your posts! This is used to prevent spam.

Verification:
Draft saved Draft deleted