close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Slide Lock vs. Power Stroke

Discussion in 'Training' started by knedrgr, Aug 20, 2011.

  1. knedrgr

    knedrgr Low capacity, low tech...

    Aug 15, 2011
  2. drcfirearms

    drcfirearms Forum Sponsor Sponsor

    517
    Aug 16, 2011
    Yeah.....because most of us are going to have to drop our weapon in combat and pick up another, totally unfamiliar pistol laying on the ground to re-engage in the fight. Happens everyday.......:peace:
     

  3. Glock2740

    Glock2740 1911 addict Staff Member Moderator

    Aug 16, 2011
    Slide release fan here.
     
  4. knedrgr

    knedrgr Low capacity, low tech...

    Aug 15, 2011
    Come on Dave, how many action movies that you've seen has that action scene in it?! LOL
     
  5. polizei1

    polizei1 It WAS Quack

    Aug 18, 2011
    The only time I use my slide stop is to lock back the slide on purpose. This is why I really like the Harrison slide stop, it works very well.
     
  6. SkDmRkLcY

    SkDmRkLcY Active Member

    Aug 17, 2011
    I have always used a Power Stroke...but I have never ever called it a Power Stroke.. that just sounds dirty.
     
  7. rsxr22

    rsxr22 Member

    484
    Aug 17, 2011
    This is really a tough area for me....
    From an instructor stand point, i much prefer and advocate power stroking, but from the competition side, it is definitely faster to release the ss with your thumb and keep going. It is tough to change gears for me when im teaching!! I'll be running a course base primarily w/ LE and private citizens for home defense and spend tons of time on power stroking then get on the line to demo and performing my speed reload using the ss LOL then i look like a real ass!!
    The truth about it is, using the ss, you are not getting full spring compression on the gun and under stress it is harder to hit, so if i did not compete and hundreths of a second did not matter, i would consistently power stroke the slide.
     
  8. CMG

    CMG Member

    835
    Aug 20, 2011
    I've been using the slide stop for too many years to think about changing, and since it works great for me, there's no need to. :grin:
     
  9. Sir Guy

    Sir Guy Sharpening Ockham's Razor Supporting Addict

    Aug 20, 2011
    Although I've trained with both, I've found that under stress I revert to the slingshot. (Well, thumb-to-the-rear pull-and-release, but that's cumbersome to write.)

    An empty gun, although a reality in a fight, is a malfunction; the gun doesn't work. Tap, rack, ready. In a slide-lock reload, the "tap" is seating the magazine. For me, I've found the consistency of motion for a malfunctioning gun to work well.

    Like many here, I advocate and appreciate different methods and alternate ways of thinking.

    Andy
     
  10. Bowtie

    Bowtie Member

    58
    Aug 19, 2011
    I always use the hand over method because its the same on every handgun..It works for me.
     
  11. CMG

    CMG Member

    835
    Aug 20, 2011
    Very few slide-stops are positioned someplace other than just above the trigger on the left side.
     
  12. Bender

    Bender Meh...... Supporting Addict

    Aug 15, 2011
    Very true,......thanks for saving me a bit of typing!
     
  13. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Schütze

    Aug 17, 2011
    I almost never use the slide stop as a release, probably because I'm shooting at the range or charging at home.. All premeditated stuff.. On a quick change under stress I would drop the slide stop.

    I do use the slide stop all the time to lock the slide open and usually whine about the surface treatment being on the wrong side. I had a nice radius cut on the last EB one (EB part) and I really like it. It's much easier to stay with.. Ron

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Bowtie

    Bowtie Member

    58
    Aug 19, 2011

    Sig's are no where near the trigger.
     
  15. CMG

    CMG Member

    835
    Aug 20, 2011
    Some are, and "very few" doesn't translate to "all". :grin:

    Sig Sauer P238
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Bowtie

    Bowtie Member

    58
    Aug 19, 2011
    Fair enough..
     
  17. Cobra64

    Cobra64 Capitalist

    17
    Aug 17, 2011
    I agree with Travis. All of my firearms instructors prefer the hand over method. There's no guess work and it will work on any semi including those without a slide lock lever.

    Clint Smith uses that technique in this malfunction clearing training video.
     
  18. Cobra64

    Cobra64 Capitalist

    17
    Aug 17, 2011
    However there are inconsistencies among differing platforms, and finding the levers in low light requires searching. Furthermore, depending on hand size, reaching for the slide lock lever will jeopardize your master grip. Fortunately the most common element on a semi is the slide which is large and always in the same place.

    Then there are those semi automatic pistols without a slide lock lever. What then?
     
  19. carguy2244

    carguy2244 Active Member

    220
    Aug 17, 2011
    In my neighborhood, everyone always uses the slide release when they go tactical. Otherwise, you have to put the cheesebuger down.
     
  20. TSiWRX

    TSiWRX Member

    861
    Aug 21, 2011
    I love to power stroke........
     
Verification:
Draft saved Draft deleted