1911 Firearm Addicts banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Today, I purchased an early Model 66 with stainless sights. I had previously seen some information regarding the alloy used in earlier production of this model being different than later editions.
Unfortunately, I’m a bit fuzzy on the details, and I can’t seem to locate the original source of the, possibly erroneous, claim.
Does anyone have any facts to validate this? And am I correct in my assumption that I can shoot .38 Specials through this gun with reckless abandon, and enough .357’s to give me a sore wrist?

Revolver Air gun Trigger Wood Shotgun
Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood
Revolver Wood Air gun Gun accessory Everyday carry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well done!
The early ones w as rear sights are worth a premium like $1200!
Yours is pristine and boxed plus has nice grain strokes on grips!
Yep shoot .38 with abandon and 158g .357 so as to not overdo it as with 125g
Thanks. That’s good to know. I’m in it for a grand. It wasn‘t a “steal”, but I thought it was a fair price for both parties.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
Thanks. That’s good to know. I’m in it for a grand. It wasn‘t a “steal”, but I thought it was a fair price for both parties.
You did good at that price, that one is in great shape. I'd have to by a another used one that showed some wear and put that one up, but that's just me. Good find enjoy it let us know how it shoots.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JackStraw

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Concerning alloy variations, I'm not aware of any significant (declared) changes in the Model 66. You may be thinking of the Model 60, S&W's first foray into production stainless revolvers, which hit the shelves around '65. The hammer and trigger were stainless, too, and galling issues soon emerged. The fix was switching back to carbon steel hammers and triggers and flash chroming them to better match the stainless finish, which became standard for all S&W stainless models until the mid'90s.

The Model 66 came to fore early '70s, when this was already hashed out.

It's the stainless sibling to the Model 19, which was created so that law enforcement officers could have a .357-capable sidearm that wasn't as much a boat anchor to lug around all day as the S&W N-frames. It was intended to be a .38 Special mostly and .357 occasionally shooter. I'd stick with that plan.

Congrats on your new revolver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,300 Posts
Today, I purchased an early Model 66 with stainless sights. I had previously seen some information regarding the alloy used in earlier production of this model being different than later editions.
Unfortunately, I’m a bit fuzzy on the details, and I can’t seem to locate the original source of the, possibly erroneous, claim.
Does anyone have any facts to validate this? And am I correct in my assumption that I can shoot .38 Specials through this gun with reckless abandon, and enough .357’s to give me a sore wrist?

View attachment 1053985 View attachment 1053986 View attachment 1053987
Early 70’s ,, Stainless sights,, M66 no dash. Beautiful Combat Magnum. I have the M66-2.. black sights ,red insert front. I shoot 38 +p+ ,, some 125gr 357. Excellent very accurate pistol. M66 and 686 are the best ones from S&W…IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Concerning alloy variations, I'm not aware of any significant (declared) changes in the Model 66. You may be thinking of the Model 60, S&W's first foray into production stainless revolvers, which hit the shelves around '65. The hammer and trigger were stainless, too, and galling issues soon emerged. The fix was switching back to carbon steel hammers and triggers and flash chroming them to better match the stainless finish, which became standard for all S&W stainless models until the mid'90s.

The Model 66 came to fore early '70s, when this was already hashed out.

It's the stainless sibling to the Model 19, which was created so that law enforcement officers could have a .357-capable sidearm that wasn't as much a boat anchor to lug around all day as the S&W N-frames. It was intended to be a .38 Special mostly and .357 occasionally shooter. I'd stick with that plan.

Congrats on your new revolver.
That was exactly the information I was searching for. Many, many thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
That is an early model 66 if the sights are stainless. They stopped doing that early in the run, so you have as rare of a 66 as there is.

If you got it for grand, that is absolutely a steal. Believe me.

They only made pinned and recessed 66’s for 10-11 years.

The 66 had a mystique to it when it came out, and it still does today.
It is the one S&W I have always wanted, but have not been able to get.

In terms of ammo, you can shoot any .38spcl load through it all day long.

For .357, shoot 158 grain or higher and make sure that the forcing cone area is very clean.

Don‘t put 125 grain Magnums through it. Especially if you have shot lead rounds through it previously. That was the recipe for cracking the forcing cone on K Frames.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
That is an early model 66 if the sights are stainless. They stopped doing that early in the run, so you have as rare of a 66 as there is.

If you got it for grand, that is absolutely a steal. Believe me.

They only made pinned and recessed 66’s for 10-11 years.

The 66 had a mystique to it when it came out, and it still does today.
It is the one S&W I have always wanted, but have not been able to get.

In terms of ammo, you can shoot any .38spcl load through it all day long.

For .357, shoot 158 grain or higher and make sure that the forcing cone area is very clean.

Don‘t put 125 grain Magnums through it. Especially if you have shot lead rounds through it previously. That was the recipe for cracking the forcing cone on K Frames.
(y)
 

·
Get off my lawn...
Joined
·
17,465 Posts
Today, I purchased an early Model 66 with stainless sights. I had previously seen some information regarding the alloy used in earlier production of this model being different than later editions.
Unfortunately, I’m a bit fuzzy on the details, and I can’t seem to locate the original source of the, possibly erroneous, claim.
Does anyone have any facts to validate this? And am I correct in my assumption that I can shoot .38 Specials through this gun with reckless abandon, and enough .357’s to give me a sore wrist?

View attachment 1053985 View attachment 1053986 View attachment 1053987
Awesome pick up! Yes & Yes!

Shoot the old gal regularly! Congratulations!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
496 Posts
Nothing like a pre-1980 66 or 19. A cylinder full of 125 357's every few months or so should be fine. 38 Special and +P you can shoot till the cows come home. 158's maybe a cylinder or two a month, so long as they're not Underwood or Buffalo Bore stuff. I don't think any of that ammo would be good for an old K frame.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top