So my opinion of glued or pinned ejectors has changed.

Discussion in '1911 Gunsmithing' started by bw210, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. bw210

    bw210 Active Member

    210
    Aug 23, 2011
    While some of my 1911's have pinned ejectors, about the same amount are glued. I know the original JMB design uses a pinned ejector, and I understand that it cuts down production cost to just glue the ejector in place. I really didn't give it much though until... the ejector came loose in my EMP40 and caused slide bind. Didn't notice anything abnormal until it bound which I promptly took the slide of and low and behold, the ejector was all nice and shinny where it rode against the slide. Round count is between 2500-3000.

    I took out the feeler gauges and found .030" under the ejector and then took another reading under the ejector between itself and the first round in the magazine and came up with .028". How could this be I wondered. I have had no malfunctions with this pistol. I dropped the mag, pushed the ejector back tight against the frame with the slide off and slammed home a full mag... the result: the ejector pushed the ejector almost .042" off the frame. At this point I pulled the ejector off the frame and found some goo which probably was the locktight used at the factory.

    So I called up Springfield and talked to customer service. Requested to have a new tuned ejector pinned, tighten up the frame/slide fit, drop the trigger pull to 4# and blend the rear of the extractor( out .040" out from the slide). No problem, mailing label will be sent within the hour. I especially like that I'm not paying for anything. Going to ship out tomorrow. One of the reasons I am brand loyal to SA. I would have thought a $900 1911 would not have glue holding parts together, but looks like everything is going to be taken care of.

    So my question, mostly out of curiosity, is this normal? I guess I could accept this a little easier if this was a dedicated range gun, but not my EDC. Thinking now if I should pin everything that isn't. Definitely won't carry anything anymore that isn't pined or glued together.
     
  2. EvolutionArmory

    EvolutionArmory Well-Known Member

    Sep 9, 2011
    You are probably the exception, not the rule.

    Having said that, I drill and pin all mine. Why mess around when it only takes a 10 cent pin and 30 seconds to do?
     

  3. Bender

    Bender Supporting Addict Supporting Addict

    Aug 15, 2011
    The Springfield EMP 9mm ejectors are "glued" in. Many work loose in just a few thousand rounds fired.
    Pinned is the only option for me.
     
  4. dirty barrel

    dirty barrel ( . Y . )

    191
    Oct 30, 2011
    It has been my experience that the NM serial number SA guns are glued and the N serial numbered ones are pinned, Go figure.

    I prefer pinned.

    I just traded a NM Loaded that is glued. I have a N Mil Spec that is pinned.
     
  5. DAT85

    DAT85 BIG OL' BALD HAID ! Supporting Addict

    Aug 26, 2011
    This....

    This line speaks volumes.

    Why save a dime ,when the life of the build will undoubtedly be extended by the expenditure of .10 worth of labor and material ?

    If unit cost is that much of a driving factor in production of your product,I get the impression that your more interested in profit than my long term satisfaction with your product.

    DAT85
     
  6. 50GI-Jess

    50GI-Jess Member

    497
    Aug 24, 2011
    It's all about production cost effeciency....read money!

    Of course glue alone won't cut it. An ejector is tapped everytime you shoot. Over time it'll work itself loose, as the glue breaks down. A propperly fitted ejector, actually has downward pressure onto the frame, created by how the pin is precision fitted in the frame. The halfmooned shaped cutout on the frontleg, is filed slightly oversized in the 6 O'clock position, so when the retainer pin is fitted trough the pin hole, it'll pull the ejector down sitting against the frame with some downward pressure.
    This way, the ejector will be absolutely rock solid, and the glue is more or less just for show, and making it even more airtight looking.

    Things can be done right or wrong...I guess it's OK to do things wrong, if one doesn't know anybetter, but to do things wrong on purpose when knowing better, is like p...... on the customer. But hey.....it's about money nothing more, not personal.
     
  7. AlchemyCustomWeaponry

    AlchemyCustomWeaponry Crabby Old Gunsmith

    Nov 4, 2011
    Actually, the idea for Springfield came out of the FBI contract. The FBI wanted their ejectors glued as opposed to pinned. That way, they could just re-glue them out in the field. Their theory is somewhat flawed in my opinion, but who am I to question them?

    I have always done it the way Jess described. Fit ejector to frame, put 1/16" Starrett punch into serial# side of ejector pin hole, slap it with a brass hammer to mark the front leg of the ejector, remove ejector, start filing with a triangular needle file a bit north of the mark, finish with a round needle file, test with the punch. If the punch either doesn't go through, or still feels really tight, you got more work to do. Once you have it right, drop some red loctite in both holes, slam the pin home, and wipe her down.
     
  8. 50GI-Jess

    50GI-Jess Member

    497
    Aug 24, 2011
    Oh boy! I remember that FBI test. Also how they insisted on 2" groups on 25 yds. with Remington Golden Saber, which is inaccurate from the beginning with too little bullet bearing surface contact with the rifling. Very good self defense round, but difficult to get to shoot well.

    Anyway, if one is planning on fixing the ejector in the field not being a trained pistolsmith, then I would select a better build custom 1911. By the way, I've only seen one broken ejector on a "quality" 1911, throughout 30 yrs of being involved in competitive shooting and military/police training.
     
  9. AlchemyCustomWeaponry

    AlchemyCustomWeaponry Crabby Old Gunsmith

    Nov 4, 2011
    I know, Jess, I know. The ejector in the FBI model gun is metal injection molded, along with the disconnector, grip safety, thumb safety, mag catch, plunger tube, sights, and firing pin stop. At least that's how it was when I was there. I may be forgetting a part or two.
     
  10. 50GI-Jess

    50GI-Jess Member

    497
    Aug 24, 2011
    So how well did they hold up in the long run. Was FBI generally happy with their purchase in the end?
     
  11. AlchemyCustomWeaponry

    AlchemyCustomWeaponry Crabby Old Gunsmith

    Nov 4, 2011
    I think they were pretty happy because Springfield was willing to jump through all their hoops. They handle the warranty work without question, and quickly. I don't think any of the other "shops" that participated in the bidding are capable of servicing the actual contract as well as Springfield has.
     
  12. 50GI-Jess

    50GI-Jess Member

    497
    Aug 24, 2011
    Yes, I think you are right. I worked for WC at the time in 97 if I remember right, and helped out with the all the testing of the guns (HRT) they submitted for the FBI test. I believe Nastoff was among one of the other contenters for the contract.
    Some days it wasn't uncommen for me to do nothing but test shooting for days, and torturing the guns in all possible ways. The calases on the web area of my hand got so thick, it changed my grip some for months after all this testing.
     
  13. nomad

    nomad Active Member

    424
    Aug 22, 2011
    So are trp's glued or pinned? and if there glued what size drill bit do you use?
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  14. bw210

    bw210 Active Member

    210
    Aug 23, 2011
    Odd... all my other SA's are pinned. "N" Loaded, "NM" Trophy Match and my CRG Pro are all pined. Heck, my two XD's have a pin through the ejector(different style but still a pin).
     
  15. EvolutionArmory

    EvolutionArmory Well-Known Member

    Sep 9, 2011
    Its so funny how so many LE agencies and the military are responsible for so many "improvements" in firearms designs.
     
  16. BuckyP

    BuckyP Well-Known Member

    Sep 15, 2011
    I'm surprised it's an issue. I've run my competition guns without the pin (or any glue) for short periods of time, and they would run without issue. Of course, they were all fitted, so not any room for play. (hmm, need a dunno emoticon)
     

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