Thumbs Forward Combat Grip

Discussion in 'General 1911 talk' started by jst1tym, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. jst1tym

    jst1tym What No Delete Button? Supporting Addict

    349
    Aug 23, 2011
    I'm throwing this out here because this particular read has helped me understand the importance of a good combat grip and how to achieve it. Since I'm a couple of years in now shooting a 1911 pistol. I'm really just starting to develop good shooting habits and what works well and promotes better results. In reading this article by two experienced competition shooters I'm correcting my grip and finding a more natural way of pointing the pistol than previously used. Since I don't currently have access to real experienced or professional shooters to provide direction, searching and reading on these forums and finding links to helpful info is a priority for me. I stumbled across this link to an article which has helped immensely to avoid developing potential bad habits that would be easier corrected now than later. For instance, with the Combat thumbs forward grip, I never found a stable grip that would keep me on target consistantly with proper trigger pull and the right pressures used by either hands on the pistol. I didn't know that by "caming" the weak hand forward I could lower my thumb straight down the frame pointed more towards the target and exert proper side to side pressure on my hand and grips to stabilize the pistol better. And at the same time using my strong hand to exert pressure on front to back of the pistol grip giving a more simultaneous equalizing of both hands overall on the control of the pistol. Using this method of grip gives me a more natural feel of the pistol and after much dry fire practice I'm not struggling and expending unecessary energy. I'm more relaxed, and point more naturally, making it easier to focus on trigger control and target acquisition. Though years behind many of you here, I feel that I'm slowly catching on, and find more enjoyment in advancing with the 1911 platform. Little by little, and with more target time, reloading, and sharing ideas with you folks, I actually have more interest in waking up each day and finding I look forward to learning and participating with my new interest. It takes away from dwelling on health issues and more towards enjoying all that I have today! Thanks folks...btw here's the link to the Combat Grip..
    http://www.handgunsmag.com/2010/09/24/tactics_training_combatg_100306/
     
  2. claire

    claire Anger Management Graduate

    394
    Sep 22, 2011
    Something I found useful was a book referred to me a couple of years ago by an instructor I had in a class. The book is Practical Shooting - Beyond Fundamentals by Brian Enos. I suggest you check it out. I bought it from Amazon.

    It really helped me identify things I could change to improve my shooting.

    claire
     

  3. claire

    claire Anger Management Graduate

    394
    Sep 22, 2011
    Another book that I've read is Surgical Speed Shooting - How To Achieve High-Speed Marksmanship In A Gunfight by Andy Stanford. Both of these books have helped me establish a foundation for shooting. When I go to the range, I always make it a point to work on different drills. A great site for drills and targets is http://pistol-training.com/drills . Most of the work I do is between 5, 7 and 10 yards. The so-called self defense distances.

    I'm sure that others will have some other ideas for you, but you are the one that must ultimately decide what is most comfortable and effective for you. It took months for me to adopt the thumbs forward grip. Now I'm happy I took the time to make the change.

    Happy Shooting!

    claire
     
  4. jst1tym

    jst1tym What No Delete Button? Supporting Addict

    349
    Aug 23, 2011
    Thanks for the leads Claire, I appreciate it! I'm always looking for a good read :thumb: Though getting to the range is bit more trouble these days, when I do make it I'll have many good things to work on. If my health didn't take such a dive I know something like IDPA would have been perfect for me. Now, bullseye may be a different horse all together provided I can stay in one place and shoot. It's the moving around that I have trouble with, my balance is skewed. I may look into the bullseye shooting if I can get my strength improved a bit. These forums give me a lot of encouragement, more so than just sitting around and vegetating..
     

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