Today in History

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by limbkiller, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. limbkiller

    limbkiller Pulling my hair. Supporting Addict

    Aug 18, 2011
    Achille Lauro hijacking ends
    1877
    Custer’s funeral is held at West Point
    • On this day in 1877, the U.S. Army holds a West Point funeral with full military honors for Lieutenant-ColonelGeorge Armstrong Custer. Killed the previous year in Montana by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Custer’s body had been returned to the East for burial on the grounds of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, where Custer had graduated in 1861-at the bottom of his class.

      Even before the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Custer had won national fame as a bold-and some said foolhardy-Civil War commander who eventually became the youngest major general in the U.S. Army. A handsome man, famous for his long blond hair (though he cut it short while in the field), Custer, even after the Civil War, continued to attract the appreciative attention of newspapers and the nation as a lieutenant colonel in the 7th Cavalry, a unit recently created to fight in the western Indian wars. Reports that Custer treated deserters of the 7th with unnecessary cruelty and overworked his soldiers led to a court-martial and conviction in 1867. But Custer redeemed himself, at least in the eyes of some, with his subsequent attack on a winter camp of Cheyenne in on the Washita River. Others, though, faulted Custer for attacking a peaceful band of Cheyenne and leaving behind some of his men when he withdrew from the battle under cover of night.

      Though Custer was controversial in his day, his spectacular death at the Little Big Horn transformed him into a beloved martyr in the eyes of many Americans, especially those who were calling for wholesale war against the Indians. Some newspapers began to refer to Custer as the “American Murat,” a reference to a famous martyr of the French Revolution, and they called for decisive retaliation against the “treacherous Indians” who had murdered the golden-haired general. Others refused to believe that Custer’s own tactical mistakes could alone explain the disaster at Little Big Horn, and they instead sought to place the blame on the shoulders of other commanders who had been at the battle. (Tellingly, no one suggested that clever tactics and leadership by the Indians might have been the cause for Custer’s defeat.) Custer’s widow, Elizabeth, also worked to transform her husband into a legend by writing several adulatory books chronicling his career. Hundreds of other books and movies, many of them more fiction than history, helped cement the image of Custer as the great fallen leader of the Indian wars in many American minds.
      Custer’s status as a national hero and martyr only began to be seriously questioned in the 1960s, and since then he has often been portrayed as a vain and glory-seeking man whose own ineptitude was all the explanation needed for the massacre at Little Big Horn. The truth about George Custer is probably somewhere in between these two extremes.
     
  2. 41 Charlie

    41 Charlie Get off my lawn...

    Feb 4, 2014
    A great write up, Edward! As always, thank you!
     
    Mike Meints, Kip and limbkiller like this.

  3. isialk

    isialk Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Jan 7, 2017
    Very interesting reading on the Achille Lauro. It was a horrifying incident! Looking at the history of that ship reveals that it had a history of it’s own. It’s not a good one. Thanks for posting this limbkiller.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. xerts1191

    xerts1191 Well-Known Member

    Aug 12, 2017
    6554BB2C-E396-4A11-9E91-D6161246B033.jpeg Custer wore “Arrow Shirts”
     

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