Today in History

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by limbkiller, Dec 15, 2018.

  1. limbkiller

    limbkiller Pulling my hair. Supporting Addict

    Aug 18, 2011
    1961
    Architect of the Holocaust sentenced to die
    • In Tel Aviv, Israel, Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi SS officer who organized Adolf Hitler’s “final solution of the Jewish question,” is condemned to death by an Israeli war crimes tribunal.

      Eichmann was born in Solingen, Germany, in 1906. In November 1932, he joined the Nazi’s elite SS (Schutzstaffel) organization, whose members came to have broad responsibilities in Nazi Germany, including policing, intelligence, and the enforcement of Adolf Hitler’s anti-Semitic policies. Eichmann steadily rose in the SS hierarchy, and with the German annexation of Austria in 1938 he was sent to Vienna with the mission of ridding the city of Jews. He set up an efficient Jewish deportment center and in 1939 was sent to Prague on a similar mission. That year, Eichmann was appointed to the Jewish section of the SS central security office in Berlin.

      In January 1942, Eichmann met with top Nazi officials at the Wannsee Conference near Berlin for the purpose of planning a “final solution of the Jewish question,” as Nazi leader Hermann Goering put it. The Nazis decided to exterminate Europe’s Jewish population. Eichmann was appointed to coordinate the identification, assembly, and transportation of millions of Jews from occupied Europe to the Nazi death camps, where Jews were gassed or worked to death. He carried this duty out with horrifying efficiency, and between three to four million Jews perished in the extermination camps before the end of World War II. Close to two million were executed elsewhere.

      Following the war, Eichmann was captured by U.S. troops, but he escaped a prison camp in 1946 before having to face the Nuremberg International War Crimes Tribunal. Eichmann traveled under an assumed identity between Europe and the Middle East, and in 1950 he arrived in Argentina, which maintained lax immigration policies and was a safe haven for many Nazi war criminals. In 1957, a German prosecutor secretly informed Israel that Eichmann was living in Argentina. Agents from Israel’s intelligence service, the Mossad, were deployed to Argentina, and in early 1960 they located Eichmann living in the San Fernando section of Buenos Aires under the name of Ricardo Klement.

      Argentina demanded Eichmann’s return, but Israel argued that his status as an international war criminal gave them the right to proceed with a trial. On April 11, 1961, Eichmann’s trial began in Jerusalem. It was the first televised trial in history. Eichmann faced 15 charges, including crimes against humanity, crimes against the Jewish people, and war crimes. He claimed he was just following orders, but the judges disagreed, finding him guilty on all counts on December 15 and sentencing him to die. On May 31, 1962, he was hanged near Tel Aviv. His body was cremated and his ashes thrown into the sea.

    1890
    Sitting Bull killed by Indian police
    1944
    Legendary bandleader Glenn Miller disappears over the English Channel
    • General James Doolittle of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), hero of the daring “Doolittle Raid” on mainland Japan and later the unified commander of Allied air forces in Europe in World War II, offered the following high praise to one of his staff officers in 1944: “Next to a letter from home, Captain Miller, your organization is the greatest morale builder in the European Theater of Operations.” The Captain Miller in question was the trombonist and bandleader Glenn Miller, the biggest star on the American pop-music scene in the years immediately preceding World War II and a man who set aside his brilliant career right at its peak in 1942 to serve his country as leader of the USAAF dance band. It was in that capacity that Captain Glenn Miller boarded a single-engine aircraft at an airfield outside of London on December 15, 1944—an aircraft that would go missing over the English Channel en route to France for a congratulatory performance for American troops that had recently helped to liberate Paris.

      It would be difficult to overstate the magnitude of Glenn Miller’s success in the years immediately proceeding America’s entry into World War II. Though he was a relatively unspectacular instrumentalist himself—he’d played the trombone in various prominent orchestras but never distinguished himself as a performer—Miller the bandleader came to dominate the latter portion of the swing era on the strength of his disciplined arrangements and an innovation in orchestration that put the high-pitched clarinet on the melody line doubled by the saxophone section an octave below. This trademark sound helped the Glenn Miller Orchestra earn an unprecedented string of popular hits from 1939 to 1942, including the iconic versions of numbers like “In The Mood” (1939), “Tuxedo Junction” (1939) and “Chattanooga Choo Choo” (1941), as well as Miller’s self-penned signature tune, “Moonlight Serenade” (1939).

    • The Glenn Miller Orchestra played its last-ever concert under Miller’s direction on September 27, 1942, in Passaic, New Jersey, and shortly thereafter, Miller entered the Army. After nearly two years spent stateside broadcasting a weekly radio program called I Sustain The Wings out of New York City, Miller formed a new 50-piece USAAF dance band and departed for England in the summer of 1944, giving hundreds of performances to Allied troops over the next six months before embarking on his fateful trip to France on this day in 1944.

      The wreckage of Miller’s plane was never found. His official military status remains Missing in Action.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018
    xerts1191, Antechinus, 1L26 and 14 others like this.
  2. 41 Charlie

    41 Charlie Get off my lawn...

    Feb 4, 2014
    Thanks for the lessons, Edward! Powerful!
     
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  3. Patton2018

    Patton2018 Member

    47
    Nov 8, 2018
    Man, I love these posts.
     
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  4. Scaramouche

    Scaramouche Student of the Columbian Exchange Supporting Addict

    Sep 15, 2015
    Dredging up separately my Sitting Bulls Says thing from last year for this day to accompany this lesson.

    I had forgotten the loss of Glenn Miller, thanks Ed!
     
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  5. Capthobo

    Capthobo NRA Endowment member Supporting Addict

    Nov 9, 2016
    Thank you Edward. Great reading to start my day.
    My dad was USAAC in the European theater WWII and loved the Glenn Miller Orchestra/Band music.
     
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  6. Bro. Pappaw

    Bro. Pappaw Well-Known Member

    Mar 18, 2016
  7. Mike A

    Mike A Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Mar 19, 2017
    Great history lessons Ed. We need more of this in our American Schools.
     
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  8. tac45

    tac45 What me worry ? Supporting Addict

    Mar 4, 2012
    Wow, a lot happened on this date. Thanks for bringing it forward Ed
    You and Mouche provide a great service to us all .
     
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  9. 1L26

    1L26 Well-Known Member

    Feb 10, 2018
    Great info! Thanks!
     
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  10. isialk

    isialk Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Jan 7, 2017
    Another great post limbkiller! My mother used to play Glen Miller on our old record player when I was little and danced with me in the dining room. Every time I hear it I remember back.
    Eichmanns ashes probably polluted the whole Med. for fifty years, worthless piece of Sxxx! All those lives wasted. Who knows what good those people could have done in this world.
    Thanks for posting.
     
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