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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question for those folks more experienced than I.

I have two Colt 1911s that had trigger jobs done by a professional gunsmith 4-5 years ago. The trigger pull used to be a crisp 3 lbs. I noticed recently that the trigger pull has increased to around 5-5.5 lbs. These guns have had a couple thousand rounds each fired through them. They have been meticulously cleaned/lubed and there is no apparent gunk around the sear, disconnector or mainspring.

Is it normal to need a trigger job refreshed? Do you have any other thoughts about what could be causing the increased resistance? I have always been careful to not let the slide slam shut on an empty chamber to avoid damage to the polished surfaces on the sear/disconnector.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Complete guess here but maybe the sear spring has been bent from how often you've reinstalled it. I don't know anything about 1911 trigger jobs when it comes to adding or removing lbs but mechanically it would make sense that the sear spring is what gives you the resistance. Am i wrong on this guys?
 

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I have a question for those folks more experienced than I.

I have two Colt 1911s that had trigger jobs done by a professional gunsmith 4-5 years ago. The trigger pull used to be a crisp 3 lbs. I noticed recently that the trigger pull has increased to around 5-5.5 lbs. These guns have had a couple thousand rounds each fired through them. They have been meticulously cleaned/lubed and there is no apparent gunk around the sear, disconnector or mainspring.

Is it normal to need a trigger job refreshed? Do you have any other thoughts about what could be causing the increased resistance? I have always been careful to not let the slide slam shut on an empty chamber to avoid damage to the polished surfaces on the sear/disconnector.

Thanks in advance.
Series 70 or 80?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Complete guess here but maybe the sear spring has been bent from how often you've reinstalled it. I don't know anything about 1911 trigger jobs when it comes to adding or removing lbs but mechanically it would make sense that the sear spring is what gives you the resistance. Am i wrong on this guys?
Thanks for the suggestion. The sear spring certainly effects the trigger pull, but I have removed the spring only once since the trigger job. That was after I noticed the problem. I thought perhaps there could be some powder residue, carbon, oil, etc. causing resistance. The trigger stirrup, sear and disconnector were all clean. I have used gun scrubber and Eezox on the slot where the trigger and stirrup slide, but no change.

I would expect the polished edge of the sear and hammer spur to last longer than a thousand rounds in a well cleaned and lubed gun. Maybe I am wrong.
 

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Silly question but how are you measuring the trigger pull? Is the method or instrument inaccurate ?
 
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Thanks for the suggestion. The sear spring certainly effects the trigger pull, but I have removed the spring only once since the trigger job. That was after I noticed the problem. I thought perhaps there could be some powder residue, carbon, oil, etc. causing resistance. The trigger stirrup, sear and disconnector were all clean. I have used gun scrubber and Eezox on the slot where the trigger and stirrup slide, but no change.

I would expect the polished edge of the sear and hammer spur to last longer than a thousand rounds in a well cleaned and lubed gun. Maybe I am wrong.

I was going to suggest that crud buildup around the sides of the sear might be your answer, but then I saw that you said it had been "thoroughly cleaned" several times. Thorough cleaning would involve removing the sear spring and sear from the frame.

The improvements I was able to get in Deadpool's trigger were 70% related to crap in and around the sear, hammer group, and disconnector channel. Cleaning out this area and lightly polishing the sides of the sear should return you to your original trigger spec.

Just my . . . . . .

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Very hard question to answer without having gun in hand. Nevertheless, I would say there are a couple of possibilities. If your overtravel screw wasn't secured with loctite and it has moved in, it can cause the trigger pull to feel harder. Also, it can cause the hammer to bump the sear as it falls forward and that can round off the sear ruining the angles cut by the smith but that often results in hammer follow not a heavy pull. I suppose it could be if the sear/hammer hook angle was not properly cut it could have worn itself into a negative angle and that would create a hard feel to the trigger pull.

Whatever it may be, best of luck in diagnosing it.
 

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I would expect the polished edge of the sear and hammer spur to last longer than a thousand rounds in a well cleaned and lubed gun. Maybe I am wrong.
This depends on the material used to make the hammer and sear, their hardness, and their geometry (how they mesh at full-cock). Not all hammers and sears are made to the same standard.
 

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Do you routinely drop the slide on an empty chamber?

It is odd that both guns are experiencing the same issue.

Over time I've seen trigger pulls DECREASE do to wear and INCREASE due to a little abuse.

Disassemble and inspect the sear nose for damage!

Smiles,
 

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So, if the same 'smith did trigger jobs on both guns, he potentially altered the hammer hooks & sear, and readjusted springs. For the pull to increase and the gun has been well cleaned and lubed, my suspicion would be that the 'smith took off enough metal to go through the heat treated area and over time the hammer hooks &/or sear nose may have changed their angles & fitment...as was mentioned above, the sear nose, in particular, is suspect, particularly if the secondary face was too large and the primary has worn down changing the engagement angle or shorten the sear. But this is all guess work. Take it to a good smith to check it out unless you are able to do this yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you all for the advice.

Do you routinely drop the slide on an empty chamber?

It is odd that both guns are experiencing the same issue.

Over time I've seen trigger pulls DECREASE do to wear and INCREASE due to a little abuse.

Disassemble and inspect the sear nose for damage!

Smiles,
No, I religiously ride the slide on an empty chamber.

So, if the same 'smith did trigger jobs on both guns, he potentially altered the hammer hooks & sear, and readjusted springs. For the pull to increase and the gun has been well cleaned and lubed, my suspicion would be that the 'smith took off enough metal to go through the heat treated area and over time the hammer hooks &/or sear nose may have changed their angles & fitment...as was mentioned above, the sear nose, in particular, is suspect, particularly if the secondary face was too large and the primary has worn down changing the engagement angle or shorten the sear. But this is all guess work. Take it to a good smith to check it out unless you are able to do this yourself.
Two different smiths. One was local and the other at Colt's custom shop. Over the 4th weekend I plan to fully strip them for a thorough cleaning and inspection. I may gently adjust the sear spring as well. If that does not resolve the issue, then I may need to take them to my local smith.

I used to store them upside down on a rack in my safe. I did not think about it at that time, but the the grip safety was constantly depressed while they were stored. Do you think this may have contributed to the increased trigger pull if the sear spring changed over time?

Again, thank you to all who have offered advice.
 
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