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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. Ive never really messed with the triggers on my 1911's, but I'm wanting to now. Would like a lighter, crisp, shorter pull on my guns. What all do I need to do? Can I just drop a Wilson combat ultralight trigger and call it good? Or do I need to do a few more things to it? Thanks!
 

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Oh boy . . . . . . .

Greetings Padawan. I too was once a grasshopper . . . . . I still am . . . . .

Nature Organism Daytime Brown Yellow
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Always liked the 1911 how it is.lol so never really looked into or did any upgrades besides the basic vz grips and night sights if need be. I did see the sear kit and hammer. Does it really make a huge difference, as opposed to just dropping a trigger in?
 

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Doing a 1911 trigger properly requires tools you do not have (sear jig, stones etc), and experience that you may or may not have. Drop in parts may improve your situation depending on the brand of 1911 that you own, but will not equal the work of whole tune. The design lends itself to wonderful results by someone who knows how to proceed. If you are only doing one or two, this is always best left to a pro as the proper tools will cost as much as the hired work, and you would still need to figure out how to properly use them. That said, I have done my own for years because I will take the time to do a much more exact job than most smiths who do the job quick and cheaply, have the tools and, most importantly, experience. In most cases, unless you are driven to learn this, you are better off having it done by a good smith.
 

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Always liked the 1911 how it is.lol so never really looked into or did any upgrades besides the basic vz grips and night sights if need be. I did see the sear kit and hammer. Does it really make a huge difference, as opposed to just dropping a trigger in?

Lots and LOTS of research and reading and bit of experimentation on a gun you really don't care if you mess up will get you started.

You will hear others say, "there is nothing in a 1911 that is a drop in part."

They are correct. You will get to the point where just changing the GRIPS on a 1911 will cause a malfunction - I know that I did.

The only part that I can think of that you can "drop-in" and get an improvement in your trigger pull would be a Cylinder & Slide Light Pull Sear Spring, but even that can and will give the uninitiated difficulties.

Your best start is to pick up Volumes 1 and 2 of the most recent edition of Jerry Kuhnhausen's shop manuals, if you are determined to go it alone.

Hope this helps.

Z



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Many other guns can be helped
by replacing trigger assemblies to obtain good results, however there is no trigger assembly in a 1911.
There is a trigger, sear, hammer, disconnect, and thumb safety which
all have spacific tolerances and are fit to each other.
This is for a pre series 80 gun without a firing pin block.
Series 80 guns have additional parts that are added to the mix.
Replace one of these parts and it will have a ripple effect on all the others.
This is part of the reason 1911 trigger pull is the best in the business,
however there is a huge downside to not getting the relationship
between the parts correct.

Please take the word of those who posted before me and let a competent
gun smith help you out.
 

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Always liked the 1911 how it is.lol so never really looked into or did any upgrades besides the basic vz grips and night sights if need be. I did see the sear kit and hammer. Does it really make a huge difference, as opposed to just dropping a trigger in?

Even if you buy a full ignition set from a respected manufacturer (hammer, strut, sear, disconnector, trigger) there are many other parts they need to be fitted to and that need to work with them (frame, slide, thumb safety, grip safety, MSH spring and cap, firing pin spring).

I've had something go astray with almost all of the above.
 

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Zoid again has the right of it. In order to get the results you're looking for, you're going to have to diddle with pretty much every part in the frame. Can you replace a trigger by itself? Yes, you can. The problem is that, when you start going for "lighter" and "shorter", it's incredibly easy to make the firearm an active danger to health and safety. If you want it done right, find a local smith that will let you look over their shoulder as they do the job.

If you're willing to take the risk on your own, then read the two Kunhausen books that Zoid suggested. After you have read those books through at least twice, buy the following parts:

1: trigger
2: sear
3: hammer
4: leaf spring
5: mainspring
6: thumb safety
7: disconnector

Then, pull the originals and set 'em aside. AS LONG AS YOU DON'T MODIFY THE FRAME IN ANY WAY, SHAPE, OR FORM, you'll always be able to get back to a working, safe 1911 no matter what you do to the new parts. Keeping the originals safe will also give you known-good parts that may (or may not) be useful for troubleshooting.
 

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I find gunsmithing very satisfying. Note that I am not a gunsmith, not even close.
I learn one procedure at a time and sneak up on the results, taking less material than I know I need to. It took me nearly a year till I was satisfied with the trigger job on my TRP. I enjoyed the journey and there was no haste involved.
That is an unusual circumstance.
There are good videos and bad videos out there. The worst are the ones that start good and go bad after you have developed trust in it.
Learn the basics from a book, watch videos till they make sense and ask intelligent, pointed questions on the forums. Buy some basic tools and get comfortable with them. That's pretty much how I learn and I haven't destroyed any parts and have a sweet running 1911 with the tuned stock MIM hammer, sear and disconnector.
 
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Hey guys. Ive never really messed with the triggers on my 1911's, but I'm wanting to now. Would like a lighter, crisp, shorter pull on my guns. What all do I need to do? Can I just drop a Wilson combat ultralight trigger and call it good? Or do I need to do a few more things to it? Thanks!
I believe they normally require some fitting, done by a qualified 1911 gunsmith.

All 1911s from NH, WC, or LB come w/ long triggers, unless otherwise ordered. My short fingers require short triggers. I just had my 1911 gunsmithing friend replace the stock WC long trigger w/ a short one. He said the fitting took 2-hours.
 
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Not to discourage you, but as others have said you would need to invest in a few tools, jigs, stones, and lots of reading ( Kuhnhausen books) material. Even the best over the counter billet/bullet proof ignition parts need some work to make them work in harmony. Do you have a competent local smith you could watch/pay him to teach you etc.

It is rewarding to do it yourself though. Good luck on your endeavors.

George

PS Joe Chambers makes some great flat triggers...just sayin'
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Zoid again has the right of it. In order to get the results you're looking for, you're going to have to diddle with pretty much every part in the frame. Can you replace a trigger by itself? Yes, you can. The problem is that, when you start going for "lighter" and "shorter", it's incredibly easy to make the firearm an active danger to health and safety. If you want it done right, find a local smith that will let you look over their shoulder as they do the job.

If you're willing to take the risk on your own, then read the two Kunhausen books that Zoid suggested. After you have read those books through at least twice, buy the following parts:

1: trigger
2: sear
3: hammer
4: leaf spring
5: mainspring
6: thumb safety
7: disconnector

Then, pull the originals and set 'em aside. AS LONG AS YOU DON'T MODIFY THE FRAME IN ANY WAY, SHAPE, OR FORM, you'll always be able to get back to a working, safe 1911 no matter what you do to the new parts. Keeping the originals safe will also give you known-good parts that may (or may not) be useful for troubleshooting.
Perfect info! Also thanks to all who have chimed in with the great info!
 
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