Unable to remove barrel bushing

Discussion in '1911 Gunsmithing' started by War Party, Feb 2, 2019.

  1. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    Hello All, I wanted to do a break down for cleaning but I’m unable to remove the barrel bushing. It’s a Nowlin Challenger 6” Longslide with a two piece guide rod that unscrews from the front with an Allen wrench, and a reverse recoil spring cap. After unscrewing and removing the front section of the guide rod I attempted to remove the barrel bushing, unsuccessfully. Using a plastic bushing wrench it will turn freely counterclockwise but only as far clockwise as shown in the attached picture. There is increasing resistance when turning in that direction, and then it feels as though it’s up against a solid wall. I shot the entire area with lubricant and let it soak, but no difference at all. Any and all help appreciated. Thanks, Bill

    DF6C6217-C772-487A-9B6F-05344A2ECE29.jpeg
     
  2. Colorado Sonny

    Colorado Sonny Deo Volente Supporting Addict

    Sep 25, 2015
    I have the same problem with my Dan Wesson 10mm Bruin long slide.
     

  3. ChuckC

    ChuckC Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Feb 2, 2016
    Have you tried removing the slide as an assembly? a”Then taking the recoil spring and guide out and getting the barrel out of battery?
     
  4. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    I started to do that (I got as far as lining up the slide and pushing the slide stop shaft in but not removing it) but wasn’t sure if something might jam. The slide is under considerable tension from the recoil spring, and the slide stop shaft is also binding inside the barrel link.

    Is it possible for there to be that much gunk in the channel the bushing lobe rides in? The gun isn’t that dirty.
     
    Colorado Sonny likes this.
  5. Integrity Arms

    Integrity Arms 1911 Pistol Smith

    Mar 20, 2017
    Put the busing in its natural position. Then try locking the slide open so your on the smaller diameter of the barrel. Then see if you can rotate the bushing.
     
  6. El Perdido

    El Perdido Fictional Western Sage

    Oct 3, 2011
    This is exactly how I remove the slide.
     
    JNW, Colorado Sonny, Ted A Mc and 3 others like this.
  7. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    Thanks, I did that too but no difference at all.
     
    Colorado Sonny likes this.
  8. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    BINGO! Thanks a million. Curious though - with everything removed I slid the bushing back into the slide and it still binds exactly the same as it did before. I inspected the channel inside the slide that the bushing lug rides in but it is clean as can be. As Yul Brynner said in The King and I, “Is puzzlement”
     
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  9. Integrity Arms

    Integrity Arms 1911 Pistol Smith

    Mar 20, 2017
    An angle bored bushing will hang up like that because in essence it is egg shaped. Instead of being completely concentric. Seems to me it has to have something to do with the longer slide and the extra tilt you get at the 1 Degree angle of the barrel lock up or something seems odd, but not out of the question. The bushing rides completely free with the barrel removed and just placing it in the slide?
     
    wcanterbury likes this.
  10. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    No, that's the crazy part. With everything taken out, with just the empty slide, the bushing still jams, exactly like it did when fully assembled.

    IMG_3733.JPG
     
    wcanterbury likes this.
  11. Integrity Arms

    Integrity Arms 1911 Pistol Smith

    Mar 20, 2017
    Color the outside of the bushing, with a blue sharpie. Place the bushing in and use a wrench to turn it back and forth a few times. The sharpie will be removed at the points of contact. This will allow you to see exactly where it is hanging up.. It has to be rubbing somewhere and if not on the tab, then it will be on the round of the exterior of the bushing. Sounds like the outside of the bushing or the inside of the slide is not concentric.
     
  12. wrmiller

    wrmiller The Tinker

    Oct 29, 2016
    That sounds like a improperly fitted bushing.

    Not to preach (much), but I never understood the practice of having a 'crush fit' on a barrel bushing. It is absolutely not necessary. I hand fit bushings so that no movement is detected when in position, but it can be removed with your fingers. No silly wrench required.

    But that's just me. LOL... ;)
     
  13. HooDoo Man

    HooDoo Man Well-Known Member Supporting Addict

    Dec 26, 2017
    This might help. On my Les Baer TRS & Premier II I bought a Steel bushing wench that has a handle about 10" long. I think it is in the BROWNELLS catalog . The Plactic short one would not move it at all. LB's bushings are fitted tighter than Hell. I still us it once and a while for super tight bushings. Also it has a paddle area to cover the recoil plug while tightening a tough bushing. Look it up. $$ well spent IMHO.
     
  14. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    Thanks everyone, I love the wide flanged bushing wrenches that make it easier to keep the end cap from ricocheting around the room, but I'm reluctant to use an extended one to gain leverage. If lube and a standard length wrench won't do it then I'll just use the method in the video above, removing the slide fully assembled. I feel pretty certain that the channel in the slide was milled improperly. Thanks again to all posters. War Party
     
    duketbrd88 and gps man like this.
  15. Gary1911A1

    Gary1911A1 Well-Known Member

    394
    Sep 12, 2011
    I bet this would be easier with a Wilson Flat Wire Spring that doesn't kink as much when you're putting the slide back on the frame.
     
    War Party likes this.
  16. Gary Wells

    Gary Wells Active Member

    263
    Sep 26, 2011
    IMHO that is a poorly designed FLGR due to the unusually long front piece of the FLGR as compared to the back piece. I would look around for a more common engineered & machined FLGR.
     
  17. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    You think the joint is weaker than it should be because it is so far to the rear? If the threaded section and the rod itself were less hefty I could see that as a possibility, but I'd need to see an engineering stress test to be sure.
     
  18. Gary Wells

    Gary Wells Active Member

    263
    Sep 26, 2011
    Not a bit. If you look at most FLGR's the threaded section is more to the middle, keeping the making it easier to re-assemble as the rear section of the FLGR holds more coils and keeps them from trying to kink/flex. I have 5 .45 autos, one 6" hoag & four 5" guns, most with 2 piece FLGR's and I wouldn't have that one pictured.
     
  19. wrmiller

    wrmiller The Tinker

    Oct 29, 2016
    Something about that pic in your first post bothered me when I first saw it, and then it dawned on me that the bushing is turned the wrong way to take it out. When looking at the muzzle, the bushing is turned counterclockwise to align the tab with the spring tunnel in the slide.
     
  20. War Party

    War Party Reasonably Well Known Member Supporting Addict

    611
    Jan 13, 2014
    I didn’t mean to say that I was trying to remove the bushing in the picture, I was just illustrating that it wouldn’t turn in that direction, making it impossible to remove the spring and end cap.
     
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