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Only when they need cleaning...😉
After a full day of chainsaw work.
Removed the first layer by shooting.
View attachment 957997
LOL...I can tell on thing, you do not live the Texas Hil country!

Doc, wife says I don't hear very well.

Ok, lean your head over and let me look inside your ear. WHAT THE HELL, your ear if full of Orange stuff, look at this.

Ohh Doc, that is Cedar sawdust, been clearing land again, cut over 1 million lbs of mostly Cedar.

Which brings me to my thoughts on cleaning guns.

I used to be fanatical about it. In the Army I was the first guy to pass inspection every time, be it my 1911, M 16, M 14. But I had a secret. Out on the ranch that old Ford 9n tractor spent a LOT of time slow speeds and rpm. So you had a hot running gas engine, Leaded gasoline and if you had not removed the exhaust flapper it would coat up with burnt on carbon. BUT the Tractor house had a solution. It was actually made by GM and all you did was pour some on, let sit about a half-hour and wipe off, carbon was GONE. Well, you did not leave the barracks on Sat until that weapon passed 'white glove', which often meant being there on Sat till 3 or later. I draw my weapon, soak in my secret sauce, put it in my wall locker, and go to the PX and the mess hall for lunch and then at 1330 when the PLT Daddy showed up hand him my weapon and I passed everything time...

FYI: Then Vietnam rolled around and they found the M16 would jam up and the ARMY blamed it on dirty weapons, a failure to clean. Typical govt/military blame it on the soldier not on the weapon. I was on the OP one night and my man said he needed to go back do something, I did not care he had been sleeping anyhow. Well, we hit and overrun and my M16 failed when I thought I needed it the most (truth be told it saved my life when it jammed). They were repelled and I laid there trying to unjam my M16. Next day the Armorer came out bring me a new BCG only this on was not black, but silver in color. Later in life I found out it was ChroMo which does not gall like Carpenter Steel does when heated from extreme use inside at Alum upper. It was the galling that was the issue. Amy still blames the soldier, nothing new.

What I learned from my time in combat (12) mo was that there no clean weapon out there. Soon as you clean it's dirty again. The Army solution was to send out bottles of the white lube and we used it liberally. There were no rags or much in cleaning supplies, so we ran wet. It worked well but still a lot of hard build-up, but that did not seem to affect so much. WWII, Korea, Vietnam, ME how often cleaned deep or just wiped and go...

Ever seen the testing done on a military firearm? Buried in the mud for 72 hrs, pick it up, shake, insert mag, shoot and it does...but wait you told me the M 16 failed because it was not clean...that had NOTHING to do with it, folks.

Video's for you viewing pleasure: Mud test on US Army 1911 - Google Search

So many many years ago I abandoned deep cleaning. When I leave the range or the field I run a light oil swab down the barrel, that is IT! Maybe after a HARD day at the range field strip and wipe and inspect.

Ruger 10/22, put over 25,000 rds down the pipe (snake hunting). Finally, it lost its accuracy and I gave it to a son of a gal I was dating for his 16th birthday. Spray gun and action with light lube and wipe, that is it.

Today modern powders and metallurgy make for some good shooting and a lot less maintenance.

I have seen some testing done on weapons with various cleaners and approaches to cleaning. By and large, the deep clean we grew up with does more damage to the gun and its rifling than just running a swab down and calling it a day.

Jeans Plant Chainsaw People in nature Tree
 

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LOL...I can tell on thing, you do not live the Texas Hil country!

Doc, wife says I don't hear very well.

Ok, lean your head over and let me look inside your ear. WHAT THE HELL, your ear if full of Orange stuff, look at this.

Ohh Doc, that is Cedar sawdust, been clearing land again, cut over 1 million lbs of mostly Cedar.

Which brings me to my thoughts on cleaning guns.

I used to be fanatical about it. In the Army I was the first guy to pass inspection every time, be it my 1911, M 16, M 14. But I had a secret. Out on the ranch that old Ford 9n tractor spent a LOT of time slow speeds and rpm. So you had a hot running gas engine, Leaded gasoline and if you had not removed the exhaust flapper it would coat up with burnt on carbon. BUT the Tractor house had a solution. It was actually made by GM and all you did was pour some on, let sit about a half-hour and wipe off, carbon was GONE. Well, you did not leave the barracks on Sat until that weapon passed 'white glove', which often meant being there on Sat till 3 or later. I draw my weapon, soak in my secret sauce, put it in my wall locker, and go to the PX and the mess hall for lunch and then at 1330 when the PLT Daddy showed up hand him my weapon and I passed everything time...

FYI: Then Vietnam rolled around and they found the M16 would jam up and the ARMY blamed it on dirty weapons, a failure to clean. Typical govt/military blame it on the soldier not on the weapon. I was on the OP one night and my man said he needed to go back do something, I did not care he had been sleeping anyhow. Well, we hit and overrun and my M16 failed when I thought I needed it the most (truth be told it saved my life when it jammed). They were repelled and I laid there trying to unjam my M16. Next day the Armorer came out bring me a new BCG only this on was not black, but silver in color. Later in life I found out it was ChroMo which does not gall like Carpenter Steel does when heated from extreme use inside at Alum upper. It was the galling that was the issue. Amy still blames the soldier, nothing new.

What I learned from my time in combat (12) mo was that there no clean weapon out there. Soon as you clean it's dirty again. The Army solution was to send out bottles of the white lube and we used it liberally. There were no rags or much in cleaning supplies, so we ran wet. It worked well but still a lot of hard build-up, but that did not seem to affect so much. WWII, Korea, Vietnam, ME how often cleaned deep or just wiped and go...

Ever seen the testing done on a military firearm? Buried in the mud for 72 hrs, pick it up, shake, insert mag, shoot and it does...but wait you told me the M 16 failed because it was not clean...that had NOTHING to do with it, folks.

Video's for you viewing pleasure: Mud test on US Army 1911 - Google Search

So many many years ago I abandoned deep cleaning. When I leave the range or the field I run a light oil swab down the barrel, that is IT! Maybe after a HARD day at the range field strip and wipe and inspect.

Ruger 10/22, put over 25,000 rds down the pipe (snake hunting). Finally, it lost its accuracy and I gave it to a son of a gal I was dating for his 16th birthday. Spray gun and action with light lube and wipe, that is it.

Today modern powders and metallurgy make for some good shooting and a lot less maintenance.

I have seen some testing done on weapons with various cleaners and approaches to cleaning. By and large, the deep clean we grew up with does more damage to the gun and its rifling than just running a swab down and calling it a day.

View attachment 962469
Welcome from Virginia... great having you here! Thank you for your service.
Looking good running the chain saw, nice guns! Couldn't resist 😉
 

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I don't need an excuse to clean a 1911 and I routinely carry a "dirty" gun too.I do like to dry fire a laser cartridge at Tucker Carlson the night before a range visit ,so I often clean and lube before. I likely have 2-3 dirty girls in the safe any time. Modern steels , ammo and running wet doesn't require more.
 

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I find cleaning my 1911s as therapeutic as shooting them. I do a thorough "field strip" after each trip to the range (though in the winter with poor ventilation, my wife complains about the smell). Every 1000 rounds or so (6-8 weeks) I strip to the frame and work it until the Q-tips come out clean. Like I said, it's therapeutic... That's another reason why I like the 1911s so much: A paperclip and Swiss Army Knife is all you need to expose it all.
 

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I find cleaning my 1911s as therapeutic as shooting them. I do a thorough "field strip" after each trip to the range (though in the winter with poor ventilation, my wife complains about the smell). Every 1000 rounds or so (6-8 weeks) I strip to the frame and work it until the Q-tips come out clean. Like I said, it's therapeutic... That's another reason why I like the 1911s so much: A paperclip and Swiss Army Knife is all you need to expose it all.
I pretty much only clean my guns for the zen of it. Usually go a thousand ish rounds between but I really do enjoy cleaning them. Same with polishing boots: instant gratification
 

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LOL...I can tell on thing, you do not live the Texas Hil country!

Doc, wife says I don't hear very well.

Ok, lean your head over and let me look inside your ear. WHAT THE HELL, your ear if full of Orange stuff, look at this.

Ohh Doc, that is Cedar sawdust, been clearing land again, cut over 1 million lbs of mostly Cedar.

Which brings me to my thoughts on cleaning guns.

I used to be fanatical about it. In the Army I was the first guy to pass inspection every time, be it my 1911, M 16, M 14. But I had a secret. Out on the ranch that old Ford 9n tractor spent a LOT of time slow speeds and rpm. So you had a hot running gas engine, Leaded gasoline and if you had not removed the exhaust flapper it would coat up with burnt on carbon. BUT the Tractor house had a solution. It was actually made by GM and all you did was pour some on, let sit about a half-hour and wipe off, carbon was GONE. Well, you did not leave the barracks on Sat until that weapon passed 'white glove', which often meant being there on Sat till 3 or later. I draw my weapon, soak in my secret sauce, put it in my wall locker, and go to the PX and the mess hall for lunch and then at 1330 when the PLT Daddy showed up hand him my weapon and I passed everything time...

FYI: Then Vietnam rolled around and they found the M16 would jam up and the ARMY blamed it on dirty weapons, a failure to clean. Typical govt/military blame it on the soldier not on the weapon. I was on the OP one night and my man said he needed to go back do something, I did not care he had been sleeping anyhow. Well, we hit and overrun and my M16 failed when I thought I needed it the most (truth be told it saved my life when it jammed). They were repelled and I laid there trying to unjam my M16. Next day the Armorer came out bring me a new BCG only this on was not black, but silver in color. Later in life I found out it was ChroMo which does not gall like Carpenter Steel does when heated from extreme use inside at Alum upper. It was the galling that was the issue. Amy still blames the soldier, nothing new.

What I learned from my time in combat (12) mo was that there no clean weapon out there. Soon as you clean it's dirty again. The Army solution was to send out bottles of the white lube and we used it liberally. There were no rags or much in cleaning supplies, so we ran wet. It worked well but still a lot of hard build-up, but that did not seem to affect so much. WWII, Korea, Vietnam, ME how often cleaned deep or just wiped and go...

Ever seen the testing done on a military firearm? Buried in the mud for 72 hrs, pick it up, shake, insert mag, shoot and it does...but wait you told me the M 16 failed because it was not clean...that had NOTHING to do with it, folks.

Video's for you viewing pleasure: Mud test on US Army 1911 - Google Search

So many many years ago I abandoned deep cleaning. When I leave the range or the field I run a light oil swab down the barrel, that is IT! Maybe after a HARD day at the range field strip and wipe and inspect.

Ruger 10/22, put over 25,000 rds down the pipe (snake hunting). Finally, it lost its accuracy and I gave it to a son of a gal I was dating for his 16th birthday. Spray gun and action with light lube and wipe, that is it.

Today modern powders and metallurgy make for some good shooting and a lot less maintenance.

I have seen some testing done on weapons with various cleaners and approaches to cleaning. By and large, the deep clean we grew up with does more damage to the gun and its rifling than just running a swab down and calling it a day.

View attachment 962469
this is true.

my details are a little fuzzy, as Uncle Earnest and Granddad are dead now, but…..

My great uncle and grand dad worked at rock island armory, were army engineers and what we would now call an SES grade. M16 production was rushed, and they started failing in the field. Soldier got blamed for a dirty weapon, when they werent. It was simply too tight a tolerance at the bolt.

Uncle Earnest had earned a reputation as a no bullshit problem solver on the Davy Crockett atomic cannon. So when the congressionals started after solider writing home about the bad rifles, and he and his team was called in to solve the M16 issue as a red team. By the time he got it, he walked passed all the engineers, and staffers, and the like- and went straight to the machine shop foreman. what they found was the tolerances of the bolt face and extractor was too tight, so they just opened it up by about a millimeter on the tolerances. Version I heard was basically the machine shop foreman “If anyone had bothered to ask me, I coulda told them this would happen.” “Well, I’m asking ya now. What’s your fix?” And they got to work.

There were other issues, of course, like the powder composition and buffer weight which they fixed. The change the military made to the original powder composition caused more fouling than what we use today or even what they switched to after discovery. The primary issues of extraction and bolt face issues was what he fixed that ultimately made the rifle serviceable.

I’m seeing my mom in a couple weeks, and I’ll ask her to bring what stuff she has collected from family records she’s kept and see what else might be there. I THINK he is also the one that lead the change to a chrome plated chamber, but I cannot confirm.
 

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I don't get nearly as much range time as I would like. Generally speaking for handguns after every range session they get wiped down and a bore snake run through them a few times, they get oiled when needed. Carry pieces get blown lint free every week or two, and oiled every two-three months or so.
 
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