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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

So I was making some 38s +p with True Blue.

The closest recipe (I have different bullets) I found was...
124 (L) RN LaserCast [email protected],193fps -> [email protected] 35,060psi 1.270"

I have 124g Berry Plated RN. I only got 1,250fps at max charge.

Just wondering what you guys do here. Safe to add more? My spent brass looks exactly like my factory spent brass.

Thanks
 

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Velocity may vary depending On barrel length and actual rifling dia. Plus chamber and throats and i believe recoil spring weight can play a role in pressure .. Proceed with caution!!!!!! Any change what so ever in load ' bullet depth 'crimp primer ' can change pressure dramatically . a ramped fully supported barrel. I recommend for hot 38 super . guys use to blow cases alot with standard barrels.
 

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Another thing to look at is how far the mentioned bullet sits down in the case compared to yours. I love to Chronograph my loads and it can make a huge difference.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
38 super.

I have them seated right about 1.270. I was wondering about keeping the same charge and trying some shorter.

I'm using a 5" Wilson 1911.
 

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I'd go more powder before changing the seating depth if you aren't getting any pressure signs. Seating depth could affect gas expansion and pressure since you are effectively reducing case volume.
 

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Yea I am not suggesting to seat your bullets lower, but you may be comparing your formula to one with less case volume.


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I would attribute difference to any of the above mentioned factors. Mostly though to the difference in the bullet itself. ie: lead RN vs Plated
 
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As others have stated a lot of factors including the fact that it is unlikely that your specific firearm will match the characteristics of what the published data used in their test.

More important than whether you got the same numbers are 1) does the load match your intended purpose; 2) is your load accurate enough for you out of your firearm; 3) is it a safe load for your firearm.
 

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Ok this is the summary no deep dive just very basic stuff. I am a BR rifle shooter.

When using data derived from a published load it is with Specific Components and fired out of a barrel that may or may not be an almost match to yours dimensionally. This means that there will be some variability even if you use the same components.

So that being said here are some specific thing to consider:
  • Bullet -- if not the same even if it is the same weight bearing surfaces will be different so different pressure and the corresponding pressure curve
  • Primer -- not a lot different but in some loads especially certain powders loaded to maximum density/compressed magnum needs to be used to ensure timely/consistent and complete ignition
  • Cases -- some have significantly different internal volume mil .45 acp brass mil vs commercial
  • Seating Depth -- this can have a significant impact on loaded ammunition pressure and corresponding pressure curves
  • Crimping -- roll for most however, taper for some automatics like the .45 acp must be adequate to prevent bullet set back during recoil impacting Seating Depth
  • Barrel Length -- this one is pretty obvious but just a couple of inches of change in barrel length with a given bullet and powder may not give you the best performance because of the burn rate of the powder and the ability of the barrel to develop the maximum pressure you are wanting.
Very Basic stuff hope it helps. :)
 
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Taper crimp die is used to remove case flair/“belling” from powder drop station.

Taper crimp itself doesn’t/won’t provide adequate case tension to prevent setback, if your expander ball and case wall thickness don’t play well together;
Ex: years back guys had problems with setback, to the point of blown cases from excessive pressures/ with Rem/UMC brass in .45 ACP.
(These were the days of 200 gr HG68’s with 5.9+- W231 for 180 PF Major. This reasonably hot load was intolerant of reducing case volume)

This brass had thinner case walls and the expander balls they were using removed what little tension the cases had received from the sizing station.

Rather doubt this is a current problem.

The point; when setting dies initially, check case tension, prior to crimping- by pushing bullet nose against bench as hard as possible, to see if you can cause bullet to set back in case.
“Taper cases” 9mm Para and .45 ACP have less case tension BY DESIGN, than straight wall pistol cases (Super, most revolver cartridges)
Don’t rely exclusively on the crimp die, taper or roll, for exclusive bullet/case tension.

(The Lee collet/factory crimp die may be an exception. Never used one as I can’t imagine it being good for accuracy. My preference is to deform or swage the bullet as little as possible.)
 

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Taper crimp die is used to remove case flair/“belling” from powder drop station.

Taper crimp itself doesn’t/won’t provide adequate case tension to prevent setback, if your expander ball and case wall thickness don’t play well together;
Ex: years back guys had problems with setback, to the point of blown cases from excessive pressures/ with Rem/UMC brass in .45 ACP.
(These were the days of 200 gr HG68’s with 5.9+- W231 for 180 PF Major. This reasonably hot load was intolerant of reducing case volume)

This brass had thinner case walls and the expander balls they were using removed what little tension the cases had received from the sizing station.

Rather doubt this is a current problem.

The point; when setting dies initially, check case tension, prior to crimping- by pushing bullet nose against bench as hard as possible, to see if you can cause bullet to set back in case.
“Taper cases” 9mm Para and .45 ACP have less case tension BY DESIGN, than straight wall pistol cases (Super, most revolver cartridges)
Don’t rely exclusively on the crimp die, taper or roll, for exclusive bullet/case tension.

(The Lee collet/factory crimp die may be an exception. Never used one as I can’t imagine it being good for accuracy. My preference is to deform or swage the bullet as little as possible.)
The reason that the taper crimp is used and if used properly, will provide adequate holding of the bullet during the feeding and chambering operation is the and we will limit our discussion to the .45acp as the case headspaces on the mouth.

One of the primary reasons that the Handloader or Reloader cannot achieve a proper crimp on a finished pistol round is not knowing what you are doing. It is just that simple. Being able to adjust all of your equipment correctly is the key to success. Part of that is as discussed immediately above is part of this however, idiots as pointed out by loading beyond the limits of the case pay for it eventually. This involves everything from having work hardened brass with not enough spring back to properly grip the bullet and it never will, expanding ball (like to use 600 grit to get my balls smooth baby) operation not being done correctly, crimp die not properly adjusted or something as simple as using the wrong bullet type seater so your rounds are not concentric. :)

Bottom line is everything as Speedy Gonzalez says "has to be Happy" in order for you to win wood! :)
 
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