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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering this morning as to why there isn't a gun maker who makes the modern 2020 recreation of the British Enfield and make it in .308 and 5.56? Or recreate the 1903 Springfield for 5.56, .308, 6.5CM, or even keep it in .30-06 cal...or keep the originals models just using newer materials.

I'm asking this b/c with new laws coming down the pike, and with support of semi-auto bans from the stupid ass "Fudds" out there b/c they think that hunting is covered under the 2nd Amendment or it's about the right to hunt (again idiots), why hasn't a gun manufacturer made or "re-made" these type of rifles?

I would love to have a US made "Enfield", "Springfield 1903" type rifle with iron sights (honestly, how many of us shoot out past 200yds/meters anyway). Maybe have a Picatinny rail on it for scope mounting option or have a side mount scope mount option similar to the M1A or AK.

I've even noticed on CMP site that you can't even get a 1903 Springfield at this time and maybe forever (unless that changed in the last month or so). I like the Enfield and Springfield 1903 type rifles b/c even though they are bolt action, they can be shot pretty quickly. I know it's going backwards, but if it means that we can keep firearms in our houses b/c it's not the scary semi-auto type rifle then I rather have something like this older battle rifles than nothing. Then again if it gets to that point it's too late anyway. What are your thoughts?
 

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Better to just push back on unconstitutional laws while you can than prematurely give up and adopt WWI era battle rifles.

Besides, a lever gun is faster than a bolt gun. If I couldn't have a semi-auto, I would pick up a lever gun. The only disadvantage is that it's harder to shoot prone.
 

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Every new bolt action is a modern version of an old military firearm, same can be said for new lever actions and new single shots. Even even the majority of new semi-autos have their roots in military weapons development. Heck, ARs, M1As, and Mini-14s are direct descendants of their military counterparts. Since the beginning of the firearms industry military weapons have influenced, either directly or indirectly, civilian firearms and the market.
Plus, there's about a bazillion sporterized Enfields, 03-A3s, Mausers, Springfields, etc, already out there for cheap money if you look around. Used o be you couldn't swing a dead cat in a gun shop without hitting a least a few of them.
 

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Antiques are great to look at, but I'd prefer something with more modern metallurgy and machining tolerances thanks. But that's just me.
 

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Us "older" shooters appreciate the rifles you are referring to. I think the issue is the younger shooters don't give a hoot about the older battle rifles. Most are only interested the "black" battle rifles of today. Us "older" shooters are slowly going away to put it nicely, and don't buy rifles like we used to. It's the younger shooters that companies are building rifles to. Just my thoughts, could be full of it as usual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Us "older" shooters appreciate the rifles you are referring to. I think the issue is the younger shooters don't give a hoot about the older battle rifles. Most are only interested the "black" battle rifles of today. Us "older" shooters are slowly going away to put it nicely, and don't buy rifles like we used to. It's the younger shooters that companies are building rifles to. Just my thoughts, could be full of it as usual.
Sad but true.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Every new bolt action is a modern version of an old military firearm, same can be said for new lever actions and new single shots. Even even the majority of new semi-autos have their roots in military weapons development. Heck, ARs, M1As, and Mini-14s are direct descendants of their military counterparts. Since the beginning of the firearms industry military weapons have influenced, either directly or indirectly, civilian firearms and the market.
Plus, there's about a bazillion sporterized Enfields, 03-A3s, Mausers, Springfields, etc, already out there for cheap money if you look around. Used o be you couldn't swing a dead cat in a gun shop without hitting a least a few of them.
But would you consider today's bolt action "battle proof", quick to load, and a rifle that doesn't mind taking a beating if need be?
 

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I never owned a Ruger Scout Rifle but on paper it seems to check all the boxes you seem to be looking for .308, 10 round magazine, peep/post sights, one piece stock, as to whether it's battle proof, I don't know, action could bind up after 62 quick consecutive fired rounds.

It's been my experience with the M 14, and to much lesser extent, the M 1, those rifles are heavier and the semi auto action helps to dissipate recoil so you could shoot them all day long in relative comfort, plus Uncle Sam was paying for the ammo.

Product Gun Firearm Trigger Line
 

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Us "older" shooters appreciate the rifles you are referring to.
Why not just buy an O3A3 or a Model 96 Sweedish Mouser they shoot &
look like a real Battle riffle. A Springfield 03 using M2 ball will do more than
you can imagine. That Steel & Walnut beauty will perform way better than
many plastic wonders will ever do today.

The M1A 7.62mm NATO is your very best friend. Pic is a (M21) M14 Sniper version.
Soldier Finger Gun Military person Joint
 

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You probably would not want to pay the price.
The fine old service rifles were made on fine old milling machines by fine old machinists. They would be expensive even if made on modern machining centers programmed by modern equipment operators. Look at the referenced modern alternatives, all have been simplified and cheapened for easy manufacture in ways that were not available 120 years ago.
 

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But would you consider today's bolt action "battle proof", quick to load, and a rifle that doesn't mind taking a beating if need be?
Are they 'battle proof'? Who knows, obviously they aren't tested to hold up to that kind of abuse. Certainly more of the bolt actions are quicker to load than the originals since the use of box magazines has become more popular vs the original internal mags. Polymer stocks are common and more or less indestructible. Metallurgy is probably better in most cases, actions are tighter and smoother thanks to modern machining, barrels are definitely better quality, and I'm sure that the average $275 Savage 30-06 is far more accurate out of the box than any WWI battle rifle hoped to be.

My Mossberg TR MVP Patrol .308, like the Ruger Scout Rifle feels pretty rugged, has a polymer stock that I expect would hold up to plenty of abuse, and uses AR10 and M14 mags and shoots under an inch at 125yds off the hood of my old Jeep. Certainly Mossbergs aren't as nice as Winchesters or Remingtons but the Marines use Mossberg shotguns and I'd hope that Mossberg builds their rifles to the same level of ruggedness. It think that with a quality 1-6x or 2-8x optic and a suppressor it could make for a pretty formidable battlefield rifle if need be.

 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Are they 'battle proof'? Who knows, obviously they aren't tested to hold up to that kind of abuse. Certainly more of the bolt actions are quicker to load than the originals since the use of box magazines has become more popular vs the original internal mags. Polymer stocks are common and more or less indestructible. Metallurgy is probably better in most cases, actions are tighter and smoother thanks to modern machining, barrels are definitely better quality, and I'm sure that the average $275 Savage 30-06 is far more accurate out of the box than any WWI battle rifle hoped to be.

My Mossberg TR MVP Patrol .308, like the Ruger Scout Rifle feels pretty rugged, has a polymer stock that I expect would hold up to plenty of abuse, and uses AR10 and M14 mags and shoots under an inch at 125yds off the hood of my old Jeep. Certainly Mossbergs aren't as nice as Winchesters or Remingtons but the Marines use Mossberg shotguns and I'd hope that Mossberg builds their rifles to the same level of ruggedness. It think that with a quality 1-6x or 2-8x optic and a suppressor it could make for a pretty formidable battlefield rifle if need be.
I like that rifle a lot to be honest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Why not just buy an O3A3 or a Model 96 Sweedish Mouser they shoot &
look like a real Battle riffle. A Springfield 03 using M2 ball will do more than
you can imagine. That Steel & Walnut beauty will perform way better than
many plastic wonders will ever do today.

The M1A 7.62mm NATO is your very best friend. Pic is a (M21) M14 Sniper version.
View attachment 392685
I had a M1a with a Sage International EBR stock, Vortex flash suppressor, NM spring guide, and it was about 1MOA at 100 yds. HEAVY AF though, but a good rifle. I sold it unfortunately for a tiny bit less of what I put into it. But it wasn't too bad of a loss.
 
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