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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
in the past 6 years I have had to send back several 9mm guns from well known semi custom makers( except for LB--theirs were perfect)

I have several 9mm guns from each and some of them had to go back because they ejected HOT casings at my face. My wifes too. other g uns (1911s and non 1911s), especially basic production(non modified) guns are perfect out of the box. Some of these semi custom 9mm 1911s shot perfectly from day 1 as well.

2 of these makers stated " we have had several folks shoot your guns and did not have that ejection issue" really ? how is that? our grips are 2 handed and we use firm wrist locking grips to boot.

the worst comment came from one maker" we had every one in the factory shoot you guns..all sized people, no one had those issues....BUT we adjusted them anyway? really?

just wondering why 1911s have so much problem with ejection.
 

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Ejector length on 9mm's tend to run significantly longer than .45 ACP, 38 Super or 10mm due to the shortened case length. I don't think I have heard of this being an issue with guys running dual caliber guns. I.E.: .38 Super/ 9mm. Maybe try shortening the ejector to. 38 Super length?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Two different companies telling you the same thing?
What ammo are you using vs. what they used for testing?
I used american Eagle and federal as well as speer and blazer brass. One company insisted that I use the american eagle 124 gr fmj. it did not matter. each gun eventually had ejector adjustments/modifications and extractor adjustments and then each gun shot perfectly regardless of ammo used
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ejector length on 9mm's tend to run significantly longer than .45 ACP, 38 Super or 10mm due to the shortened case length. I don't think I have heard of this being an issue with guys running dual caliber guns. I.E.: .38 Super/ 9mm. Maybe try shortening the ejector to. 38 Super length?
BINGO. the anesthesia did nothing to damage how that great brain works. the ejectors are usually 38 super and long ejectors work better


hoping you feel better asap Zoid. prayers sent
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
seems to me that internal extractors have issues as well. I have never had a gun with an external extractor fail to eject properly.
 

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The extra long 9mm ejector in my 1991A1 broke from contact with the top round in the magazine. Rather than file a replacement down to a needle to clear, I went with a Super ejector. It throws the empties the same as ever.

I think the extractor plays a large part. The hook engagement and tension are not like a .45.
 

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I will let you know how it goes. I’m gather parts for my first 9mm build.

I’ve read many times that the farther you get from an all steel 5” .45 the more issues you need to deal with. JMB figures so much leeway into the design that it left a lot of margin for error.
 

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Is it mathematics? Stacked tolerances? What came first design or .45acp? I believe the USA specs demanded larger than .38/9mm.. JMB seemed to go .38x1.5 to .45. Anyone?
 

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The platform was designed initially to be a Govt length 45ACP. As you deviate from that, things start happening that may be no bueno.
9mm 1911s (and is the entire reason I only own one now) can be finicky and for me has always been the tension on the extractor. I'll have to fiddle with it until I get the perfect tension to give me a good 4 o'clock brass placement. This happens to all my double stacks as well, but they tend to be far better at reliability. The double stack being more reliable in 9mm I attest to a magazine that was developed around the 9mm vs bastardizing the 45acp mag to accept 9mm like in the 1911.
What's funny is that the opposite is true for double stacks. A 45 in double stack will give you more hell than a 9mm in single stack. Not sure where I read it, but the order of reliability in the 1911 platform goes like this:
1911 in 45 ACP
Double stack in 9mm
1911 in 9mm
Double Stack in 45 ACP
And having owned multiple versions of each, I will attest this is damn accurate. At least in my experience.
 

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It's the lack of muzzle energy and recoil needed to cycle the pistol sufficiently. This is the main reason Colt used the pencil barrel and lightened the slides initially on 9mm 1911's. The full diameter 9mm barrel is much heavier than a 45 barrel. That weight chews up some of the energy needed to cycle the slide. (the barrel and slide both move together for a short time before the barrel cams down out of the way) Virtually all semi customs use a full diameter 9mm barrel w/supported ramp to boot. This adds a lot of weight compared with the original pencil barrel. To combat this loss of recoil energy, the answer has been to compensate with lower spring rates in both the mainspring and recoil spring. I think maybe you have just had some bad luck along the way, doc. There has probably never been a better time to own and use 9mm 1911's. Everyone is doing a very good job in respect to turning out a product that really performs.

Sometimes manufacturers fall down in respect to tuning the extractor. They feel that the light recoil spring they need won't actually feed against a properly tuned extractor. Thus, they run tension on the extractor on the light end of the tolerance which can result in wonky ejection patterns. Once corrected, they find that they can indeed get away with some decent tension in the extractor without giving up anything from a feeding perspective.
 

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It's the lack of muzzle energy and recoil needed to cycle the pistol sufficiently. This is the main reason Colt used the pencil barrel and lightened the slides initially on 9mm 1911's. The full diameter 9mm barrel is much heavier than a 45 barrel. That weight chews up some of the energy needed to cycle the slide. (the barrel and slide both move together for a short time before the barrel cams down out of the way) Virtually all semi customs use a full diameter 9mm barrel w/supported ramp to boot. This adds a lot of weight compared with the original pencil barrel. To combat this loss of recoil energy, the answer has been to compensate with lower spring rates in both the mainspring and recoil spring. I think maybe you have just had some bad luck along the way, doc. There has probably never been a better time to own and use 9mm 1911's. Everyone is doing a very good job in respect to turning out a product that really performs.

Sometimes manufacturers fall down in respect to tuning the extractor. They feel that the light recoil spring they need won't actually feed against a properly tuned extractor. Thus, they run tension on the extractor on the light end of the tolerance which can result in wonky ejection patterns. Once corrected, they find that they can indeed get away with some decent tension in the extractor without giving up anything from a feeding perspective.
This^^
Ive seen a number of extractors simply “tensioned” and thrown in the slides.
No tuning involved other than that.
 

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I had a few issues early on with my Warren tactical 9....all the issues I experienced were quickly resolved once I switched to a 14lb recoil spring. Now I'm over 10k round through the gun and it still runs flawlessly . My SACS 9MM custom carry came with a 9lb? spring (I believe) from the custom shop.....it was way too light...again switched to a 14 and has ironed out any issues.
 

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NH built my Firehawk, in 9mm with a 9 pound recoil spring w/weight forward on a 3.9" .
For one thing NHC does a fine job with theirs and for another the Firehawk ain't your average 9mm 1911. It's got that heavy front end from a comp, so that adds some extra engineering to it. But, no doubt it runs well.
 

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Strange that the .38 Super seems generally trouble free.
I'm betting the overall length putting it closer to the feedramp plus the semi-rim on it helps feed more reliably.
 
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